Neptune 5: A Practically Perfect Plasma-Based Distro

By Jack M. Germain

ZevenOS’ Neptune 5.0, released earlier this month, offers a refreshing take on a classic KDE-based Linux distro. Neptune 5 Refresh replaces version 4.5 and closes a dormant period that had produced no new releases for more than two years. The wait may be worth it for Linux fans who are devoted to the KDE Plasma desktop. Neptune 5 sports an easy-to-use USB installer tool. An included Persistent Creator makes it simple to store the operating system to the USB drive. You can update the USB drive installation easily.

From: Linux Insider

Linux Mint 19 “Tara” Will Ship in June, Pre-Installed on the Mintbox Mini 2 PCs

By Softpedia News (Marius Nestor)

The Linux Mint project announced today details about the second-generation Mintbox Mini PC, along with the expected release date of the upcoming Linux Mint 19 “Tara” operating system.

If you’re a Mintbox Mini user, you should know that Mintbox Mini 2 is currently in the works and it’s coming this summer. It will be based on the Compulab Fitlet2 tiny computer, which suggests that Compulab is once again behind the production of the Mintbox Mini PCs, and will have better specifications and more features.

Compared to the first generation Mintbox Mini, Mintbox Mini 2 features dual-band antennas, two USB 3.0 ports, a microSD slot, audio and micro jacks, and a Kensington lock that’s now available on the right side. Two programmable LEDs are present as well in the front, and the unit is as silent as you’d want it to be.

“Just as before, the unit is completely silent and it has no fans or moveable parts. It’s also dust and h… (read more)

From: Softpedia

Stone: A new era for Linux’s low-level graphics – Part 2

By corbet Here’s the
second part
of Daniel Stone’s series on recent improvements in
low-level graphics support. “The end result of all this work is that
we have been able to eliminate the magic side channels which used to
proliferate, and lay the groundwork for properly communicating this
information across multiple devices as well. Devices supporting ARM’s AFBC
compression format are just beginning to hit the market, which share a
single compression format between video decoder, GPU, and display
controller. We are also beginning to see GPUs from different vendors share
tiling formats, in order to squeeze the most performance possible from
hybrid GPU systems.

From: LWN