What is a private cloud? [ And some things that it’s not]

Private cloud is a well-defined term that government standards groups and the commercial cloud industry have pretty much agreed upon, and while some think its use is waning, recent analysis indicates that spending on private cloud is still growing at a breakneck pace.

A study by IDC projects that sales from private-cloud investment hit $4.6 billion in the second quarter of 2018 alone, which is a 28.2 percent increase from the same period in 2017.

So why are organizations attracted to private cloud?

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Source: Network World

Making better use of your Linux logs

Linux systems maintain quite a collection of log files, many of which you are probably rarely tempted to view. Some of these log files are quite valuable though and options for exploring them might be more interesting and varied than you imagine. Let’s look at some system logs and get a handle on some of the ways in which log data might be easier to probe.

Log file rotation

First, there’s the issue of log rotation. Some Linux log files are “rotated”. In other words, the system stores more than one “generation” of these files, mostly to keep them from using too much disk space. The older logs are then compressed, but left available for a while. Eventually, the oldest in a series of rotated log files will be automatically deleted in the log rotation process, but you’ll still have access to a number of the older logs so that you can examine log entries that were added in the last few days or weeks when and if you need to look a little further back into some issue you’re tracking.

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Source: Network World

BrandPost: When Will We Be Able to Purchase 802.11ax Access Points and Client Devices?

Today we focus on when new 802.11ax access points and client devices will become available. The Wi-Fi industry has made these questions uniquely difficult to answer, but this blog explains what we expect to happen. If you have the patience, save these predictions for rereading toward the end of 2019!

The three important milestones along the path to commercial equipment are the IEEE 802.11ax standard, the Wi-Fi Alliance 11ax certification, and integrated circuit chips. These are a sequence in time, but with a lot of overlap.

The First Milestone: IEEE
The IEEE writes standards: very detailed definitions of the packet formats, fields, and functions that make the protocols work. IEEE 802.11ax is written as an amendment to the current 802.11 standards and eventually will be folded into the mainstream 802.11 document. Even as an amendment, however, it is 600 pages long. Getting every detail of such a standard correct requires scrutiny from many experts, and the IEEE process involves reviewing drafts and submitting comments and corrections, which then update new drafts, and are reviewed again.

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Source: Network World

Gartner: Digital business projects in a quagmire? Hack your culture!

ORLANDO – If you are a CIO or business leader an are having trouble moving forward on a new or existing digital business project, you should hack your current IT culture to get things moving.

Digital business is accelerating, disrupting the way businesses and governments are doing business, said Mike Harris, executive vice president and global head of research for Gartner at the kickoff of Symposium/IT Expo the consulting firm’s annual strategyfest that this year drew over 9,000 CIOs and IT professionals for a look at the technologies and trends.

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Source: Network World

Paul Allen, Microsoft co-founder, sports evangelist, philanthropist dead at 65

Microsoft co-founder, philanthropist,  space enthusiast, owner of the NBA’s Portland Trail Blazers and the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks, Paul Allen, has died.  He was 65.

Allen’s family issued a statement today through by Vulcan Inc., Allen’s privately held company,  on behalf of the Allen Family, Vulcan and the Paul G. Allen network.

“It is with deep sadness that we announce the death of our founder Paul G. Allen, co-founder of Microsoft and noted technologist, philanthropist, community builder, conservationist, musician and supporter of the arts. Mr. Allen died on Monday afternoon, October 15, 2018, from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Seattle.”

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Source: Network World

This Platform Is Making Management of Apple Devices Easy

Whether you’re just getting your small business off the ground or growing an already successful venture, onboarding and maintaining your employees’ tech gadgets are important steps. Unfortunately, IT can be expensive — and out of the question for many small businesses. Even if you can afford to purchase reliable Apple devices for your growing staff, it can be hard to find the time to keep them updated without a specialist. That’s where Jamf Now comes into play: it’s a cloud-based solution that delivers Apple management and security with just a few minutes of setup.

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Source: Network World

How industrial predictive maintenance can prevent equipment failure

Entropy sucks. But industrial predictive maintenance can help it suck a little less for factories, oil rigs, aircraft engines, and even data centers. The key is to leverage the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to help companies “accurately determine when a manufacturing plant, machine, component, or part is likely to fail, and thus needs to be replaced.”

That, in a nutshell, is the point behind a fascinating new Google Cloud blog post by Prashant Dhingra, Machine Learning Lead, Advanced Solutions Lab, laying out “A strategy for implementing industrial predictive maintenance.”

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Source: Network World

Huawei targets Nvidia, Intel, Qualcomm with new AI chips

Chinese smartphone giant Huawei Technologies Co. announced at its Huawei Connect 2018 show in Shanghai an update to its Ascend artificial intelligence (AI) chips with a new set of cloud services, software, tools, training, and framework.

The company is putting itself in direct competition with the main AI chip developers in the U.S., namely Nvidia, Intel, and Qualcomm, but also ARM, IBM, to some degree Google, and even fellow Chinese tech giant Alibaba.

Chairman Eric Xu introduced the Ascend 910 and Ascend 310 chips along with the Compute Architecture for Neural Networks (CANN), a chip operators library and automated operators development toolkit, and MindSpore, an inference framework for devices, edge networks, and cloud training.

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Source: Network World