VMware Draws on Open Source to Manage Cloud Micro Services

By Jack M. Germain

VMware last week released details about two new open source projects that aim to bridge the divide between the company’s virtualization software and other vendors’ containers. Both projects integrate into VMware’s unified platform for the hybrid cloud. Project Lightwave and Project Photon could tip sides in the ongoing debate within cloud computing and virtualization markets over running containers on standalone hardware or in virtual machines with virtualization software.

From: Linux Insider

Ubuntu’s Vivid Vervet Makes Snappy Entrance

By Jack M. Germain

Canonical on Tuesday announced the release of Ubuntu 15.04, aka “Vivid Vervet,” as in East African monkey. It will be available for download on Thursday. The new OS offers tools for cloud, device, client and Internet of Things development. The Ubuntu desktop release includes mostly maintenance and bug fixes, along with new integrated menus and dashboard usability improvements. Ubuntu 15.04 for cloud and servers comes at a critical time to attract companies adopting cloud technologies.

From: Linux Insider

Survey: OSS Gives Enterprises More Bang for Less Bucks

By Jack M. Germain

Black Duck Software and North Bridge Venture Partners on Thursday published the results of The Ninth Annual Future of Open Source Survey. The number of companies using at least some open source products or developing software built with open source components is at an all-time high, the survey found. The results reflect the increasing adoption of open source and highlight the abundance of organizations participating in the open source community. They also underscore the need for formal policies and management strategies.

From: Linux Insider

SuperX OS Greases the Classic Linux Wheel

By Jack M. Germain

SuperX OS is a solid Linux distribution that dispels all of the criticisms about using free open source operating systems. SuperX is a relatively new distro developed by Libresoft. Based on Ubuntu and Debian, it adds a highly customized KDE desktop environment. Version 3.0 — dubbed “Grace” after computing pioneer Grace Hopper — was released March 23. The maturity and impressive performance of this latest release makes the SuperX OS a prime replacement choice for whatever distro you now use — it is that good.

From: Linux Insider

New Smart Drone Breaks $1K Barrier

By John P. Mello Jr.

A new aerial drone from 3D Robotics packs two computers and an array of powerful features for $999. The computers — one on the craft and one in the controller — have enabled it to make some radical breakthroughs in autonomous flight and camera control, according to 3DR. Built on 1-GHz Cortex A9 ARM chips running Linux, the computers allow operators to preprogram the drone’s flight path so they can concentrate on shooting video or stills from the unmanned aircraft system and not be distracted by piloting tasks.

From: Linux Insider

Chrome Web Store Gives Bad Extensions the Boot

By Jack M. Germain

Google recently purged some 200 extensions from its Chrome Store inventory. Extensions and add-ons let users add functions and features to the Chrome Web browser, but bad extensions can expose users to a greater risk of spyware and malware. A major problem with many browser add-ons is ad injectors. The clean-up resulted from an extensive search for embedded code that violates Google’s policies, triggered by increasing user complaints. Google has been studying add-on security risks with a team at the University of California, Berkeley.

From: Linux Insider

Parsix 7 Morphs GNOME Into a Better Desktop

By Jack M. Germain

Linux GNOME desktop distros are a dime a dozen. What makes Parsix a shinier dime than many of the others is how the tweaking of the GNOME desktop makes this distro such a pleasure to use. Dubbed Nestor, Parsix 7 is wrapped around Debian GNU/Linux Wheezy 7.0. The project’s goal is to provide a ready-to-use and easy-to-install operating system based on Debian’s testing branch and the latest stable release of the GNOME desktop environment. The Parsix distro meets that goal — and goes even beyond.

From: Linux Insider

Microsoft Could Throw Windows Wide Open

By John P. Mello Jr.

Open sourcing the code for Microsoft Windows is “definitely possible,” Microsoft engineer Mark Russinovich reportedly said last week during a panel discussion at ChefConf. The company isn’t acknowledging any movement in that direction as yet, but Russinovich’s remarks are a strong indication that the Microsoft of today isn’t the trenchant foe of the paradigm it was in the past. Open source code has become a part of business life, and Microsoft has accommodated that reality, he acknowledged during the ChefConf session.

From: Linux Insider

Google Goes Crazy for Chromebooks

By Jack M. Germain

Google has announced two new budget-busting Chromebook computers, a tablet/notebook convertible with a full swivel screen, and a Chrome computer-on-a-stick. The Haier Chromebook 11 and the Hisense Chromebook both are available for preorder for $149. The Asus Chromebook Flip will hit the market this spring with a $249 price tag. The Asus Chromebit will be available this summer for less than $100. “Chromebooks … could and should put increasing pressure on lower-end PCs and laptops,” said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

From: Linux Insider

Big Money Helps Cyanogen Go for Android’s Jugular

By Jack M. Germain

Cyanogen this week announced the completion of a follow-up round of Series C financing that brought $80 million in new funds to pay for more hiring and accelerated development of its open platform software development kit. Cyanogen is committed to liberating the Android OS from the financial grip of Google. Its CyanogenMod firmware adds considerable personalization features and improvements to the Android platform. Cyanogen has spurred a developing secondary app market for an alternative Android distribution based on its mods.

From: Linux Insider