Endless OS Helps Tear Down Linux Wall

By Jack M. Germain

The Endless OS is a distro with its own adapted desktop environment based on Gnome 3, and with an even simpler and more streamlined user experience. Although it looks and feels a lot like an Android shell running on a PC, Endless OS is a fully functional Linux distro designed to be easy to install and very simple to use. The latest version’s features include automatic updates, improved launch speed for applications, and some Flatpak programs from the Flathub community repository rather than Endless’ custom repository.

From: Linux Insider

Suse, AWS Nudge SAP Customers to the Cloud

By David Jones

Suse recently entered an agreement to expand its relationship with Amazon Web Services, allowing Suse Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications to be sold directly on the AWS Marketplace. AWS customers that are running SAP workloads on Suse Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications — a leading platform for SAP Hana and SAP S/4Hana — will get integrated and streamlined support from AWS and Suse under the agreement. AWS customers will be able to buy the Suse Linux Enterprise on demand, so they will pay only for what they use.

From: Linux Insider

SentinelOne Debuts Unified OS Threat Protection

By Jack M. Germain

SentinelOne this week announced a partnership with Microsoft to bolster threat protection for mixed platform users, making computing safer for Linux machines in a multiplatform workplace. SentinelOne will integrate its Endpoint Protection Platform with Microsoft’s Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection service to cover Mac and Linux device platforms. SentinelOne’s EPP technology will feed all threats and detections from Mac and Linux endpoints seamlessly into the Windows Defender ATP console.

From: Linux Insider

Kudos to Namib Linux for Making Arch Approachable

By Jack M. Germain

Namib is an ideal Linux distro for anyone who wants to ease into the Arch approach to computing. Namib is a newcomer — the third and current release arrived late last year. However, it makes up for its lack of age by its performance. Namib makes Arch simple. Surprisingly very user-friendly as well as compatible with older computers, Namib also is very stable. Since Namib is based on the Arch philosophy, it uses rolling releases so you do not have to reinstall the entire operating system every time a major update occurs.

From: Linux Insider

Open Up the Source Code to Lock Down Your Data

By Jonathan Terrasi

Meaningful security is more than an app or an OS. It’s a mindset. Linux security tools by themselves will not make you or anyone more secure. Security requires trade-offs in convenience, so the tools I’ll highlight here are not recommended as “daily drivers.” Only you can determine your ideal balance point. Perhaps the single greatest strength of Linux is that it is one of the few open source operating systems, and among the most widely developed. “But wait,” you might ask, “wouldn’t releasing the source code make a system less secure?”

From: Linux Insider

WiFi Routers Riddled With Holes: Report

By Jack M. Germain

Most WiFi router vendors have not patched numerous firmware vulnerabilities discovered more than two years ago, according to a report released Tuesday. OEM firmware built into WiFi routers use open source components that contain numerous known security vulnerabilities that can be exploited by hackers, it notes. Insignary conducted comprehensive binary code scans for known security vulnerabilities in WiFi routers. The company conducted scans across a spectrum of the firmware used by the most popular home, SMB and enterprise-class WiFi routers.

From: Linux Insider

Open Source Software Turns 20-Something

By Jack M. Germain

Saturday marks the 20th Anniversary of open source, sort of. Open source led to a new software development and distribution model that offered an alternative to proprietary software. No single event takes the prize for starting the technology revolution. However, Feb. 3, 1998, is one of the more significant dates. On that day, Christine Peterson, a futurist and lecturer in the field of nanotechnology, coined the “open source” term at a strategy session in Palo Alto, California, shortly after the release of the Netscape browser source code.

From: Linux Insider

Skype Comes to Linux in a Snap

By Jack M. Germain

Canonical has announced the availability of Skype as a Snap file, the universal Linux app packaging format. The release means that Skype can deliver its communication service to a wider range of Linux users, not just those who run Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux distribution. Skype, a Microsoft product, is an application that lets users make video and voice calls, and send files, video and instant messages. Skype-to-Skype calls are free anywhere in the world. Premium features like voicemail, or calls to landlines and cellphones carry a cost.

From: Linux Insider

Privacy-Minded Smart Speaker May Struggle to Get to Know You

By David Jones

Mycroft AI earlier this week announced that its Mark II smart speaker achieved full funding on Kickstarter in just 6.5 hours. As of Wednesday, pledges reached more than three times its $50K goal — with 23 days remaining in the campaign. The Mark II is positioned as an open source alternative to the dominant Amazon Echo line of smart speakers and its main challenger, the Google Home device. One of the main draws of the Mark II is its emphasis on maintaining user privacy, an increasing concern as the market for smart home devices has exploded.

From: Linux Insider

Free Linux Tool Monitors Systems for Meltdown Attacks

By Jack M. Germain

SentinelOne has released Blacksmith, a free Linux tool that can detect Meltdown vulnerability exploitation attempts. The company has been working on a similar tool to detect Spectre vulnerability attacks. Though free, Blacksmith is not open source. SentinelOne decided to expedite its development in-house to save time, said Raj Rajamani, vice president of project management. The company has made the tool available to everyone for free in the hope of securing Linux systems while reliable patches are developed.

From: Linux Insider