[$] Some 4.16 and -stable development statistics

By corbet The 4.16 development cycle is shaping up to be a
relatively straightforward affair with little in the way of known problems
and a probable release after nine weeks of work. In comparison to the wild
ride that was 4.15, 4.16 looks positively calm. Even so, there is a lot
that has happened this time around; read on for a look at who contributed
to this release, with a brief digression into stable kernel updates.

From: LWN

Public Lab and Karen Sandler are 2017 Free Software Awards winners

By ris The Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced
the winners of the 2017 Free Software Awards during LibrePlanet.
Public Lab is a community and non-profit organization with the goal
of democratizing science to address environmental issues. Their
community-created tools and techniques utilize free software and low-cost
devices to enable people at any level of technical skill to investigate
environmental concerns.
” The organization received the Award for
Projects of Social Benefit. Karen Sandler, the Executive Director of the
Software Freedom Conservancy, received the Award for the Advancement of
Free Software.

From: LWN

Security updates for Monday

By ris Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (bchunk, thunderbird, and xerces-c), Debian (freeplane, icu, libvirt, and net-snmp), Fedora (monitorix, php-simplesamlphp-saml2, php-simplesamlphp-saml2_1, php-simplesamlphp-saml2_3, puppet, and qt5-qtwebengine), openSUSE (curl, libmodplug, libvorbis, mailman, nginx, opera, python-paramiko, and samba, talloc, tevent), Red Hat (python-paramiko, rh-maven35-slf4j, rh-mysql56-mysql, rh-mysql57-mysql, rh-ruby22-ruby, rh-ruby23-ruby, and rh-ruby24-ruby), Slackware (thunderbird), SUSE (clamav, kernel, memcached, and php53), and Ubuntu (samba and tiff).

From: LWN

Kernel prepatch 4.16-rc7

By corbet The 4.16-rc7 prepatch is out; it’s
probably the last one. “I’m still not *planning*
on an rc8 this release, because while rc7 is bigger than usual,
nothing in here makes me go ‘Hmm, maybe we should delay the release’.
But let’s see what happens this upcoming week – if next Sunday comes
around, and there’s lots of new stuff, I’ll reconsider then.

From: LWN

Stone: A new era for Linux’s low-level graphics – Part 2

By corbet Here’s the
second part
of Daniel Stone’s series on recent improvements in
low-level graphics support. “The end result of all this work is that
we have been able to eliminate the magic side channels which used to
proliferate, and lay the groundwork for properly communicating this
information across multiple devices as well. Devices supporting ARM’s AFBC
compression format are just beginning to hit the market, which share a
single compression format between video decoder, GPU, and display
controller. We are also beginning to see GPUs from different vendors share
tiling formats, in order to squeeze the most performance possible from
hybrid GPU systems.

From: LWN

Security updates for Friday

By jake Security updates have been issued by Debian (adminer, isc-dhcp, kamailio, libvorbisidec, plexus-utils2, and simplesamlphp), Fedora (exim and glibc-arm-linux-gnu), Mageia (sqlite3), openSUSE (Chromium, kernel, and qemu), SUSE (memcached), and Ubuntu (sharutils).

From: LWN

[$] Energy-aware scheduling on asymmetric systems

By corbet Energy-aware scheduling — running a system’s workload in a way that
minimizes the amount of energy consumed — has been a topic of active
discussion and development for some time; LWN first covered the issue at the beginning of 2012.
Many approaches have been tried during the intervening years, but little in
the way of generalized energy-aware scheduling work has made it into the
mainline. Recently, a new patch set was
posted by Dietmar Eggemann that
only tries to address one aspect of the problem; perhaps the problem domain
has now been simplified enough that this support can finally be merged.

From: LWN

Krita 4.0 released

By corbet Version 4.0
of the Krita drawing tool has been released; see this
article
for a summary of the new features in this release.
Krita 4.0 will use SVG on vector layers by default, instead of the
prior reliance on ODG. SVG is the most widely used open format for vector
graphics out there. Used by ‘pure’ vector design applications, SVG on Krita
currently supports gradients and transparencies, with more effects coming
soon.

From: LWN