Oracle open-sources DTrace under the GPL

LinuxSecurity.com: Oracle appears to have open-sourced DTrace, the system instrumentation tool that Sun Microsystems created in the early 2000s and which has been beloved of many-a-sysadmin ever since. As noted by developer Mark J. Wielaard, this commit by an Oracle developer shows that something is afoot.

From: Linux Security

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Global security crackdown, a host of code nasties, Brit cops mocked, and more

LinuxSecurity.com: At the Munich Security Conference in Germany, major companies, including Siemens, Airbus, Allianz, Daimler Group, IBM, NXP, SGS and Deutsche Telekom, signed a Charter of Trust for cybersecurity. The signatories were joined by Elżbieta Bieńkowska, the EU Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises, and Canada’s foreign minister and G7 representative Chrystia Freeland.

From: Linux Security

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New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

LinuxSecurity.com: Companies around the globe are scrambling to comply with new European privacy regulations that take effect a little more than three months from now. But many security experts are worried that the changes being ushered in by the rush to adhere to the law may make it more difficult to track down cybercriminals and less likely that organizations will be willing to share data about new online threats.

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A potent botnet is exploiting a critical router bug that may never be fixed

LinuxSecurity.com: A fast-moving botnet that turns routers, cameras, and other types of Internet-connected devices into potent tools for theft and destruction has resurfaced again, this time by exploiting a critical vulnerability that gives attackers control over as many as 40,000 routers. Despite the high stakes, there’s no indication that the bug will be fixed any time soon, if at all.

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Hack the Air Force 2.0 uncovers over 100 vulnerabilities

LinuxSecurity.com: The second Hack the Air Force bug bounty challenge, Hack the Air Force 2.0, has resulted in 106 vulnerabilities being reported and fixed. On Thursday, bug bounty platform HackerOne revealed that the 20-day competition to find vulnerabilities in federal systems resulted in $103,883 in payouts, bringing the total amount of financial rewards to over $233,000 to date.

From: Linux Security

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