2016 Linux predictions: Which ones came true?

By Bryan Lunduke

Roughly one year ago, I made a series of predictions about what would happen in the Linux world during 2016. Let’s take a look at just how wrong I was.

1. We still won’t be using Wayland

Ah, Wayland. The eternally yearned for replacement for Xorg that never seems to ship by default on any (major) Linux distribution. I predicted that the status quo would remain the same—that the world would remain Wayland-less throughout 2016.

I was wrong.

On Nov. 22, 2016, Fedora 25 shipped—and with Wayland as the default display server.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: Are we in a golden age of open source or just openwashing?

By Neela Jacques

We are witnessing a golden age of open source. Never in the history of the technology industry have we seen so many developers coding in the open, jointly working on common codebases that can be leveraged by any individual user or company.

This trend is a huge step forward, with broad benefits to both the user and vendor community. It is spurring significantly greater innovation and interoperability across solutions.

+ Also on Network World: The shift in open source: A new kind of platform war +

Our entire industry has fallen in love with all things open, especially open source. Linux has become all-pervasive from supercomputers to GoPros to vehicles, and new open-source projects are sprouting like daylilies in the Texas summer. In networking alone we have Open Network Summit, OpenFlow, OpenDaylight, ONOS, OPNFV, OpenNFV, OpenSwitch, OpenvSwitch, Open Virtual Networking, Telecom Infra Project (Facebook), IO Visor Project, FD.io, Open Source Mano and, most recently, Open-O.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

Why a cross-platform Microsoft is good for your business

By Mary Branscombe

Microsoft has joined the Linux Foundation as a Platinum member. Google is joining not just the .NET foundation but the steering committee, alongside RedHat and Samsung, which is supporting .NET code on all of its Tizen devices, from smart TVs to wearables and IoT devices, running on ARM. The preview of SQL Server on Linux is ready for IT teams to try out and it has key security and data warehouse features, not just the basics. A version of Microsoft’s premier development tool, Visual Studio, has even come to Mac OS.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

(Insider Story)

From: Network World

Linux-y things I am thankful for

By Bryan Lunduke

Thanksgiving is in a few days, and talking about “things I am thankful for” is pretty traditional this time of year.

So, here we go. Here’s my list of Linux-y (and free software-y) things I am thankful for in 2016. (At least the ones I could remember when I sat down to write this list.)

1. I am thankful for the developers of cmus, tmux, midnight commander and all of the other projects that help make using the shell in Linux such a productive and enjoyable experience.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

Microsoft embraces open source in the cloud and on-premises

By Thor Olavsrud

With the announcement of a broad swathe of new data products and services at Microsoft Connect in New York City last week — including that the next release of SQL Server will support Linux (and Docker) — the software giant has signaled a renewed focus on customer choice and flexibility, underscoring the increasing importance of cloud computing as a central pillar of its business.

“We’ve been on this journey for the last few years now,” says Rohan Kumar, general manager, Database Systems, Microsoft. “It’s really a company about choice right now. We really want to meet customers where they are.”

Microsoft has offered multiple flavors of Linux on its Azure cloud public cloud platform and infrastructure for several years now.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

This new Ubuntu Linux laptop has a 4K screen and Nvidia Pascal GPU

By Agam Shah

System76’s Ubuntu-based Oryx Pro is a Linux laptop loaded with features also found in some of the fastest Windows laptops.

The Oryx Pro can be the ultimate Linux gaming laptop. It can be configured with a 15.6-inch 4K screen and Nvidia’s latest Pascal GeForce GTX 1070 GPU.

The laptop with those features starts at $1,987, and goes higher as more storage and memory are added. The ultimate 4K Oryx Pro configuration with 9TB of SSD storage prices out at $7,012. It comes preloaded with Ubuntu 16.04 or 16.10.

There’s an option to get the laptop with a 15.6-inch full HD screen and Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1060 GPU starting at $1,499. The laptop can also be configured with 17.3-inch 1080p screens.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

Microsoft really has changed, Linux Foundation chief says

By Blair Hanley Frank

Microsoft made a splash in the tech industry on Wednesday when it announced that it had joined the Linux Foundation as a platinum member. While the move felt like a welcome extension of the tech giant’s open source strategy to some, others saw it as a threat to Linux.

Microsoft’s addition to the foundation was a positive step for the open-source community overall, Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, said in an interview. In his view, adding Microsoft as a foundation member is an important move to further the Linux Foundation’s mission, “which is to create the greatest shared technology asset in history.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

By Dan Kusnetzky

While I was off fighting viruses, SUSE released an update to its SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, a popular business Linux operating environment. The focus of this service pack appears to be accelerating network performance, enhancing support for SAP applications and HANA, improving support for IBM Power architecture systems and other important improvements.

What SUSE has to say about this release

  • Ten-fold increase in packet processing via software-defined networking (SDN) that combines Open vSwitch with the Data Plane Development Kit. This is a key enabler for telecom providers to efficiently implement virtual network functions. Added to SUSE Linux Enterprise’s broad hypervisor support, the integration of DPDK gives customers a complete virtualization solution for cloud and on-premise deployments.
  • More agile support for SAP applications to ease migration to S/4HANA, accelerate deployment of SAP applications, tune SAP HANA for performance, and create a more resilient and secure SAP environment with enhanced support for SAP HANA clusters, even on geographical levels.
  • Reduced downtime and improved I/O performance through persistent system memory applications using integrated Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs) that save data in seconds and make data immediately available on reboot.
  • Increased ability to implement cost-effective, high-performance data analytics on IBM Power Systems LC and OpenPOWER servers, including bare metal support.
  • Time- and resource-saving “skip service packs” functionality, which lets customers skip upgrades of prior service packs and jump straight to SP2 from SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12.
  • Ongoing FIPS 140-2 certification to meet strict security requirements of federal government, Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) and financial industry customers.
  • Reduced downtime for large-memory IBM POWER-based systems via minimized memory initialization times for server restarts along with high availability and geo clustering support for IBM POWER.
  • Support for ARMv8-A, including enablement for the Raspberry Pi3, making SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 one of the first commercially available enterprise Linux platforms for this architecture.
  • Support for Intel’s scalable Omni-Path Architecture to deploy high-performance computing workloads.
  • Simplified access to the latest packages and technologies via SUSE Package Hub integration with SUSE Customer Center, helping customers seamlessly obtain modules and package updates.

Input from partners, including HPE, Intel and others, has enabled building NVDIMM capability as an integral component of the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 platform, allowing customers to benefit from early adoption.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World

Microsoft doubles down on Linux love, joins foundation

By Blair Hanley Frank

After a long campaign against open source and Linux, Microsoft has for the past few been pushing its love of the popular operating system. On Wednesday, the company made that even more official by joining the Linux Foundation, an organization that shepherds development of the operating system’s kernel and provides funding for open source projects.

Microsoft also launched the public beta of SQL Server on Linux, the much-anticipated port of the relational database software that was first announced in March. Linux developers can also start working with a beta of Azure App Service, which is designed to take away the work of managing infrastructure for cloud-based apps.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

From: Network World