Self-protection is key to Linux kernel security

By Fahmida Y. Rashid

Linux has quietly taken over the world. The operating system now powers the large datacenters that make all our cloud applications and services possible, along with billions of Android devices and internet-connected gadgets that comprise the internet of things (IoT). Even the systems that handle the day-to-day operations on the International Space Station run Linux.

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(Insider Story)

From: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: Resin.IO puts Linux and containers to work for IoT

By Dan Kusnetzky

Resin.IO is working to make the use of containers and microservices useful tools to developers of Linux-based Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

CEO Alexandros Marinos said the company has been working for three years to make mainstream containers attractive to developers of embedded workloads, such as those found in IoT applications. The company calls this the “Industrial Internet.”

What Resin.IO offers

Resin.IO offers a development and deployment framework based upon Linux and containers (Docker) that is designed to facilitate control of the on-device environment, provision devices on the network, and manage of what the company calls a “fleet” of systems. These tools also make it possible to automate operations of “the fleet” and keep it secure through the use of encrypted communications to/from devices in “the fleet” that deploys two-factor authentication.

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From: Network World

New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month

By Bryan Lunduke

Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation).

With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.

+ Also on Network World: Free Software Foundation shakes up its list of priority projects +

I’m not setting some crazy goal here—not requiring that I donate beyond my means. Heck, some months I may be able to donate only a few bucks. But every little bit helps, right?

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From: Network World

New details emerge about Intel’s super-small Euclid computer for robots

By Agam Shah

Intel is getting proficient at developing small computers. First, came its Compute Sticks and then its credit-card-shaped Compute Cards.

But nothing’s quite like the mysterious Euclid, which is a self-contained computer the size of a thumb designed to be the brains and eyes of a robot.

More details have emerged about the computer, which was announced in August and has yet to be released.

The Euclid is so small and light that’s possible to hold like a pen. It has a built-in 3D RealSense camera, making it like a PC fused into a Microsoft Kinect.

The design makes it possible to install the Euclid where the eyes of a human-like robot would be typically placed. The 3D RealSense camera will act as the eyes of a robot, capturing images in real-time and helping with movement.

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From: Network World

As with PCs, you can now customize Raspberry Pi-like computers

By Agam Shah

The Raspberry Pi 3 is a great product, but it can’t be customized. People may desire more storage or a faster processor, but have to settle for features on the board computer.

The lack of customization with board computers is driven by their low prices. Buyers get features commensurate with the low price of boards like the US$35 Raspberry Pi and $15 Pine64.

No one’s complaining about the low prices, but the one-size-fits-all nature may not be for everyone. Taking a page from PC makers, Via Technology is now making it possible to configure board computers to specific needs through its website.

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From: Network World

Microsoft’s new Linux option for Azure is Clear in the cloud

By Jon Gold

Microsoft announced today that it has added support for the Intel-backed Clear Linux distribution in instances for its Azure public cloud platform.

It’s the latest in a lengthy string of Linux distributions to become available on the company’s Azure cloud. Microsoft already supports CentOS, CoreOS, Debian, Oracle Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, SUSE Enterprise Linux, OpenSUSE and Ubuntu in Azure instances.

+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Windows 10 peeping: Microsoft fails to understand the uproar + Oracle patches raft of vulnerabilities in business applications

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From: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: IoT security principles from Homeland Security

By Deepak Puri

Power grids were bombed in World War II to cripple industrial output. Today, attacks against Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure causes even broader disruptions—without bombs.

The danger is real. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently published guidelines to “provide a strategic focus on security and enhance the trust framework that underpins the IoT ecosystem.” The report explains why security has to be a combined effort.

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From: Network World

Why Linux users should worry about malware and what they can do about it

By Alex Campbell

Preventing the spread of malware and/or dealing with the consequences of infection are a fact of life when using computers. If you’ve migrated to Linux or Mac seeking refuge from the never-ending stream of threats that seems to target Windows, you can breath a lungful of fresh air—just don’t let your guard down.

Though UNIX-like systems such as Mac OS X and Linux can claim fewer threats due to their smaller user bases, threats do still exist. Viruses can be the least of your problem too. Ransomware, like the recent version of KillDisk, attacks your data and asks you to pay, well, a king’s ransom to save your files. (In the case of KillDisk, even paying the ransom can’t save you if you’re running Linux.)

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From: Network World

Review: PocketCHIP—Super cheap Linux terminal that fits in your pocket

By Bryan Lunduke

Portable, pocket-sized computer. Runs Linux. Has a good battery life. Bonus points for a physical keyboard, and full-size USB port. Double bonus points for being cheap.

That’s sort of my ideal “carry with me” device. If I can have a Linux device, with a proper shell that I can work entirely from, I’m a happy camper. Over the past few years I’ve been able to hobble together a few devices to accomplish this Utopian goal—more or less.

At one point, I hobbled together a makeshift Raspberry Pi case (with a screen that I powered with an external USB power supply) using a whole lot of electrical tape. That was great except the “case” was just—well—tape. And I couldn’t find a tiny physical keyboard that fit with the size of it.

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From: Network World

Raspberry Pi roundup: Read all about it, in today’s Daily Prophet online

By Jon Gold

The Raspberry Pi roundup is back from its winter holidays, and boy, has it ever been nerding out. There’s nothing like being back at the old homestead to make you read well-loved old classics like the Harry Potter books.

Appropriately, then, for the first Raspberry Pi roundup after the festive season, we’ve got a copy of the Daily Prophet that does what a wizarding newspaper is supposed to do, thanks to the technical wizardry of Piet Rullens. (And the always excellent Raspberry Pi Foundation blog for bringing it to our attention.)

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecOcu0Dr2UI]

Rullens turned a trip to the Harry Potter theme park in Orlando into an attractively designed and authentic-looking Daily Prophet poster, thanks to a cunningly placed Raspberry Pi 3 and some skillful cutting. An IR distance sensor, when tripped, fires up the screen, which plays a clip of Rullens at the amusement park.

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From: Network World