Backup vs. archive: Why it’s important to know the difference

If you want to make a backup person apoplectic, call an old backup an archive.

It’s just shy of saying that data on a RAID array doesn’t need to be backed up. The good news is that the differences between backup and archive are quite stark and easy to understand.

What is backup?

Backup is a copy of data created to restore said data in case of damage or loss. The original data is not deleted after a backup is made.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: Identifying the Internet of Things – one device at a time

As IoT movement pervades every facet of our lives, the pace of innovation in this field continues to grow. We are seeing novel uses of this technology that are very cool – we are also seeing a lot of implementations that are downright silly! However, most if not all, of these are very impactful. As we have seen in the past with agriculture or healthcare, IoT is moving fast and is here to stay. However, this being a classic case of trying to run before we’ve learned how to walk, IoT device developers often leave out the core component of any connected service in today’s world – security.

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Source: Network World

Qualcomm/Facebook gigabit Wi-Fi field trials to start in 2019

How should a company develop when its growth is dependent on availability of internet? Build out the internet is probably the answer. And that’s just what Facebook intends to do.

The social network has just nabbed Qualcomm to help build its 2016-announced 60GHz urban Wi-Fi network, says Qualcomm. The chip maker recently announced that that the companies intend to start trials of the high-speed broadband solution sometime around mid-2019.

“This terrestrial connectivity system aims to improve the speed, efficiency, and quality of internet connectivity around the world at only a fraction of the cost of fiber,” Qualcomm says in its release.

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Source: Network World

While no one was looking, California passed its own GDPR

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is widely viewed as a massively expensive and burdensome privacy regulation that can be a major headache and pitfall for American firms doing business in Europe. Many firms, including Facebook, have sought ways around the law to avoid having to deal with the burden of compliance.

Well, there is no weaseling out now. Last week, with no fanfare, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB375, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, the California equivalent of GDPR that mirrors the EU law in many ways.

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Source: Network World

Pulse Secure VPN enhanced to better support hybrid IT environments

The workplace is changing rapidly as employees embrace mobility, applications are in the cloud, and Internet of Things (IoT) devices are instrumented for continuous connectivity — and this is affecting how organizations must think about secure access. Regardless of the scenario, organizations want solutions that deliver better productivity for whomever (or whatever) is connecting, a consistent user experience, compliance with corporate policies and regulatory requirements, and strong end-to-end security.

This is the playing field for Pulse Secure, a company that has built a broad portfolio of access products and services that are available as a unified platform. Pulse Secure has considered practically every use case and has built a range of solutions to solve the secure connectivity challenges that IT organizations face. The company claims to have more than 20,000 customers and a presence in 80 percent of global enterprises — maybe even yours.

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Source: Network World

BrandPost: The Growing Role of Network Teams in Security

Network and security are notoriously siloed. That’s understandable as network operations are primarily responsible for ensuring reliable service quality and compute capabilities to run the enterprise, while security is focused on setting up barriers against intruders and cleaning up systems that have been infected. But with the continuing rise in cybersecurity threats, it’s increasingly clear that it’s open season on corporate networks and breaking down the traditional wall separating network and security teams is essential to defending the enterprise.

Each team has evolved with different skill sets and different missions: one is expected to facilitate access from anywhere, the other is charged with blocking access to anybody who isn’t authorized. They utilize different tools and may work in separate network operations and security operations centers.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: 6 key themes shaping the future of network performance management

We live in an exciting era for IT. Countless new technologies are changing how networks are built, how access is provided, how data is transmitted and stored, and much more. Cloud, IoT, edge computing and machine learning all offer unique opportunities for organizations to digitally transform the way they conduct business. Different as these technologies are, they are unified by their dependence on a properly functioning network, on what might be called “network continuity.” The key component for achieving network continuity is visibility.

It’s no secret that new and emerging technologies have always driven networking best practices. With such a wide range of business objectives and activities relying on IT, network performance really is a life or death issue for most companies. So, it’s critical that we maintain a firm grasp on the latest industry trends in order to make informed, strategic network management decisions.

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Source: Network World

BrandPost: Coherent Optics: Taking Fiber Optics to the Next Level

What is coherent optics?

At its most basic, coherent optical transmission is a technique that uses modulation of the amplitude and phase of the light, as well as transmission across two polarizations, to enable the transport of considerably more information through a fiber optic cable. Using digital signal processing at both the transmitter and receiver, coherent optics also offers higher bit-rates, greater degrees of flexibility, simpler photonic line systems, and better optical performance. 

It’s a web-scale world. On-demand content, bandwidth-hungry mobile apps, high-definition video streaming, and new cloud-based IT applications are driving massive scale and unpredictable traffic patterns. Network capacities are increasing by 25% to 50% every year, and systems running at 10 Gb/s just cannot keep up with this kind of rapid scalability.

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Source: Network World