IDG Contributor Network: 13 debts of tunnel networks

Tunnels for networking are not good. We see a real-life example taking place with the twelve Thai boys that were stuck at the end of a tunnel with a very narrow section under water preventing passage. The tunnel offered them only one way out, and the particular path was not passable. This is what happens in networks. We’re thankful for the heroic rescue of these brave boys, but networks don’t always fare as well.

You will hear others speak about how a tunnel-based virtual network is the next amazing trend in networking. In fact, an analyst recently told me tunnels are great. And they are, when used for the purpose they were intended. But, using tunnels to get aggregates of packets to go where they wouldn’t go otherwise is dangerous, and will lead to the accumulation of technical debts.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: What are the best practices when cabling for Wi-Fi?

An infrastructure design consideration that arguably frustrates users, and creates a never-ending headache for network administrators, is the quality of Wi-Fi service in a building. Typically, a poor user experience is one where users have either no signal on their wireless device or see “full bars” but cannot connect to the network.

In an office environment poor Wi-Fi performance is undoubtedly an annoyance, but in a hospital, it could prevent medical staff from delivering care in a timely manner. Waiting for a mobile terminal to retrieve the medical history of a seriously ill patient can literally be a matter of life and death.

Proper cabling is the foundation of Wi-Fi performance

Configuring a wireless access point system (AP) is a complex project and is not the subject of this post, although Aps or AP systems of course plays an important role in Wi-Fi network best practice. To provide network integrators with the best chances of success, the cabling infrastructure must be available to support optimal installation and placement of AP.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: The 5 pillars of cloud data management

As more and more businesses adopt cloud services, seizing on the latest software tools and development methodologies, the lines between them are blurring. What really distinguishes one business from the next is its data.

Much of the intrinsic value of a business resides in its data, but we’re not just talking about customer and product data, there’s also supply chain data, competitor data, and many other types of information that might fall under the big data umbrella. Beyond that there are a multitude of smaller pieces of data, from employee records to HVAC system logins, that are rarely considered, but are necessary for the smooth running of any organization. And don’t forget about source code. Your developers are using cloud-based repositories for version control of application code. It also needs to be protected.

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Source: Network World

Converting and manipulating image files on the Linux command line

Most of us probably know how wonderful a tool Gimp is for editing images, but have you ever thought about manipulating image files on the command line? If not, let me introduce you to the convert command. It easily coverts files from one image format to another and allows you to perform many other image manipulation tasks as well — and in a lot less time than it would take to make these changes uses desktop tools. Let’s look at some simple examples of how you can make it work for you.

Converting files by image type

Coverting an image from one format to another is extremely easy with the convert command. Just use a convert command like the one in this example:

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Source: Network World

Taking the temperature of IoT for healthcare

The Internet of Things (IoT) is full of promises to transform everything from transportation to building maintenance to enterprise security. But no field may have more to gain than the healthcare industry. Healthcare providers and device makers are all looking to the IoT to revolutionize the gathering of healthcare data and the delivery of care itself.

But while many of those benefits are already becoming reality, others are still on the drawing board. Two very different IoT healthcare stories crossed by desk this month — taken together they provide a surprisingly nuanced picture of healthcare IoT.

Smart bandages still in prototype

First, I was excited to hear about the development of advanced prototypes of “smart bandages.” Developed by researchers at Tufts University using flexible electronics, these smart bandages not only monitor the conditions of chronic skin wounds, but they also use a microprocessor to analyze that information to electronically deliver the right drugs to promote healing. By tracking temperature and pH of chronic skin wounds, the 3mm-thick smart bandages are designed to deliver tailored treatments (typically antibiotics) to help ward off persistent infections and even amputations, which too often result from non-healing wounds associated with burns, diabetes, and other medical conditions.

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Source: Network World

Extreme facing challenges, girds for future networking battles

Extreme Networks is contending for greater influence from the data center to the network edge but it’s got some obstacles to overcome.

Extreme is still grappling with how to best integrate, use and effectively sell the technologies it has acquired from Avaya and Brocade in the past year as well as incorporate and develop its own products to do battle in the cloud, mobile and edge computing environments of the future.  Remember too that Extreme bought wireless player Zebra Technologies in 2016 for $55 million.

In terms of results that Wall Street watches Extreme Networks grew revenue 76% to $262 million, in its recent fiscal third quarter.  According to Extreme those gains were fueled mostly by growth from its acquisitions and around an 8% growth in its own products. 

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Source: Network World

Get a 299-Piece All-Purpose First Aid Kit For $12 Today

This full-fledged, easy-to-tote first aid softpack is designed to save time and frustration in the midst of an emergency. It’s compact and portable, but contains 299 physician-recommended supplies.  Among the items neatly organized inside the zippered kit is a first aid guide, vinyl gloves, bandages, cold compress, gauze pads, trauma pad, cotton-tipped applicators, first aid tape roll, antiseptics and all three common OTC pain medications. The kit is currently a #1 best seller on Amazon, averages 4.6 out of 5 stars from over 2,230 customers, and its typical list price of has been reduced to just a hair over $12. Click over to Amazon to see this deal.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: Machine learning takes a load off in network management

As networks become more software-driven, they generate vastly greater amounts of data, which provides some challenges: adhering to compliance and customer privacy guidelines, while harvesting the massive amounts of data—it is physically impossible for humans to tackle the sheer volume that is created. But the vast amounts of data also provide an opportunity for businesses: leveraging analytics and machine learning to gather insights that can help network management move from reactive to proactive to assurance. This doesn’t just mean a massive shift in technology because the human element won’t simply go away. Instead, by combining human intellect and creativity with the computing power AI offers, innovative design and management techniques will be developed to build self-improving intelligent algorithms. The algorithms allow networks to operate in a way that far outweighs networks of the past.

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Source: Network World

Two studies show the data center is thriving instead of dying

Once again research is showing that rumors of the demise of the data center are greatly exaggerated. One study shows across-the-board growth in IT spending, while a second predicts that the financial services sector is really set to explode.

Market research firm IHS Markit surveyed IT managers at 151 North American organizations and found that most of them expect to at least double the amount of physical servers in their data centers by 2019.

“We are seeing a continuation of the enterprise DC growth phase signaled by last year’s respondents and confirmed by respondents to this study. Enterprises are transforming their on-premises DC to a cloud architecture, making the enterprise DC a first-class citizen as enterprises build their multi-clouds,” wrote Clifford Grossner, senior research director in the cloud and data center research practice at IHS Markit.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: 4 ways data science services is helping businesses reach IoT goals, faster

Data scientists are an essential part of an IoT deployment. They fill a critical need to interpret data and provide valuable context around machine learning. However, as IoT initiatives expand and mature in a business, in-house data science resources can become thinly stretched. This creates a data pile-up that is a surefire way to set your deployment back.

Hiring more data scientists is typically not an option either as there is a significant shortage in the market. Demand is only going up too: Gartner predicts that a shortage of data scientists will hinder 75% of organizations from reaching their full potential with IoT through 2020. Because hiring is difficult, time consuming and expensive, many organizations are turning to data science services to fill in resource gaps. Outsourcing data scientists has the dual benefit of helping keep IoT initiatives moving forward while freeing up internal resources to focus on other areas of the business.

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Source: Network World