Amazon denies reports it is targeting the network switch market

Amazon Web Services has denied publicly and privately to Cisco that it is targeting Cisco’s bread-and-butter network switching market after a report emerged a few days ago claiming AWS was intending to do just that.

A report in The Information last Friday said AWS was preparing to enter the network switching market, using off-brand “white box” products powered by open-source software. The news quickly made the rounds on Monday, when everyone started paying attention (including me), and the result was a big hit to Cisco’s stock.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: Communications hubs emerge as a bridge to hybrid IT

Adoption of hybrid IT for delivery of applications across legacy enterprise data centers, and increasingly cloud SaaS and IaaS platforms, is rendering traditional network architectures obsolete. Numerous analysts and articles have predicted the coming obsolescence of hub and spoke MPLS networks anchored on legacy enterprise data centers. While few have detailed what to do about it, a growing number of enterprises are taking matters into their own hands. Those in the know are leveraging communication hubs, sometimes also referred to as cloud hubs, to bridge the gap between their legacy data center environments and the cloud.

The growing challenge of SaaS application performance

As enterprises accelerate their move to cloud, including the growing trend toward cloud office suites, such as Office 365 and Google Suite, where users expect LAN-like performance, challenges are mounting. According to Microsoft, Office 365 is growing at 43 percent, and as of the end of 2017 was boasting 120 million active users. A 2017 survey by TechValidate noted that despite increasing both firewall and network bandwidth capacity, nearly 70 percent of companies experienced weekly network-related performance issues after deploying Office 365. Gartner’s 2018 Strategic Roadmap for Networking, released earlier this year, noted that nearly all enterprises will need to look beyond MPLS and at re-architecting the WAN to optimize for cloud.

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Source: Network World

Why NVMe? Users weigh benefits of NVMe-accelerated flash storage

IBM has an answer for some of the biggest trends in enterprise data storage – including Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe), artificial intelligence, multi-cloud environments and containers – and it comes in a 2U package.

The new FlashSystem 9100 is an all-flash NVMe-accelerated storage platform. It delivers up to 2 petabytes of effective storage in 2U and can provide up to 32 petabytes of all-flash storage in a 42U rack.

NVMe is a protocol for accessing high-speed storage media that’s designed to reduce latency and increase system and application performance. It’s optimized for all-flash storage systems and is aimed at enterprise workloads that require low latency and top performance, such as real-time data analytics and high-performance relational databases. Storage vendors have been re-tooling their systems to support the faster interconnect protocol, and IBM is no exception.A key change in the FlashSystem 9100 is the use of small form factor NVMe drives. IBM redesigned its FlashCore technology to fit into a standard 2.5-inch SSD form factor with NVMe interfaces – a move that reduced the physical size of the drives by more than half.

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Source: Network World

Internet infrastructure will be inundated as sea levels rise, says report

By 2033, over 4,000 miles of underground fiber will be beneath sea water, and hundreds of data centers will be affected, reseachers at University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of Oregon say. The conduits carrying the internet cables and the cables themselves are not designed for it — they’re water-resistant but not waterproof. That means global communications will get disrupted if action isn’t taken to mitigate the risk, the experts say.

New York, Miami, and Seattle are the three major U.S. conurbations that the group says are most susceptible to metro-area cable inundation. However, the effects would ripple through the internet. And Los Angeles would be hit in its long-haul installations.

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: Network visibility and assurance for GDPR compliance

The EU General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, came into force on May 25. With every organization with customers and suppliers in the European Union now accountable for the way in which they handle or process personal data, much work has been done to ensure compliance by the deadline. As a result, all levels of a business are now concentrated on meeting the requirements of the new regulation, throwing the issue of data protection into focus like never before.

When you consider how big and complex IT networks have become in recent times, however, it has become almost impossible to detect just when and how a security breach or network failure might occur. Unsurprisingly, network security and information assurance are crucial to GDPR compliance, with the regulation stating that measures must be put in place to mitigate the risk associated with assuring information integrity and availability in the face of threats such as malicious code or distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks.

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Source: Network World

Happy Amazon Crash Day

On one of the biggest shopping days of the year for Amazon.com the company’s web site crapped out intermittently for hours yesterday.

Instead of Prime Day purchases, many customers just got error messages and pictures of the dogs of Amazon, along with a message from Amazon that read: “Sorry, we’re experiencing unusually heavy traffic. Please try again in a few seconds. Your items are still waiting in your cart,” or “”Uh-Oh. Something went wrong on our end.”

Prime Day started at 3PM ET and the problems emerged almost immediately after.  Around 5 p.m., Amazon tweeted acknowledgement of the problem stating: “Some customers are having difficulty shopping and we are working to resolve this issue quickly.  Many are shopping successfully – in the first hour of Prime day in the US, customers have ordered more items compared to the first hour last year.”

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Source: Network World

IDG Contributor Network: 6 sneaky ways cloud infrastructure providers lock you in

With more enterprises adopting multi-cloud and hybrid cloud computing strategies, it’s more important than ever to avoid getting locked into just one cloud provider’s tools and technologies. Multi-cloud and hybrid cloud deployments offer many benefits. They include the ability to pick and choose which cloud vendor’s add-on services are right for your business, as well as the ability to implement best-of-breed solutions when the time is right. Multi-cloud also adds redundancy and security because all of your proverbial eggs are not in one basket.

Despite the trend toward multi-cloud, however, there are still plenty of ways to find yourself locked in. Here’s a quick look at six common ways enterprises get locked into using one provider, along with some advice on how businesses can keep cloud implementations open and interoperable. 

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Source: Network World

BrandPost: How Cloud Migration Impacts Network Infrastructure

The Cloud Imperative

Enterprise IT is increasingly a multi-cloud affair. With Gartner projecting that 85 percent of enterprises are currently using a multi-cloud strategy, it seems difficult to find an enterprise that doesn’t. IT leaders are like conductors – orchestrating SaaS, PaaS, and on-premises code and data in increasingly virtualized, software-defined environment. With the cloud taking center stage, what impacts does migration of workloads have on infrastructure overall?

Migration Challenges for Infrastructure

As IT strives to be more responsive to both lines of business and development teams seeking to spin up new instances and environments, workloads often need to move – and rapidly. But workload mobility has a downside, namely an increasing demand on the shared services on- and off-premises.

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Source: Network World

Amazon rumored to be entering the networking market

It’s hard to remember a time when people thought Amazon was nuts for going into the cloud computing business, since it was so far removed from the company’s core ecommerce business. No one is laughing now.

It seems history could repeat itself. According to an article in The Information, Amazon is rumored to be targeting a new industry, albeit one dominated by a giant player and multiple healthy competitors — the network switching business. The move would put it in direct competition with Cisco, HPE, Juniper Networks, and Arista.

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Source: Network World