How to disable IPv6 on Linux

By Dan Nanni IPv6 has been introduced as a replacement of IPv4, the traditional 32-bit address space used in the Internet, to solve the imminent exhaustion of available IPv4 address space. However, since IPv4 has been used by every host or device connected to the Internet, it is practically impossible to switch every one of them to IPv6 overnight. Numerous IPv4 to IPv6 transition mechanisms (e.g., dual IP stack, tunneling, proxying) have been proposed to facilitate the adoption of IPv6.

From: LXer

Create a new Access Point Name on your Android device

By Jack Wallen Now that it’s become easier to swap out SIM cards on smartphones, the ability to swap devices to nearly whatever network you want is a reality. In some cases, the simple act of swapping out the SIM will be enough. There are cases, however, where the Access Point Name (APN) on the device will not allow the phone to communicate with the new carrier cell towers.

From: LXer

SCALE 13x, Day 1: Oh, the Humanity!

By Larry Cafiero Attendance for SCALE looks like it may break previous records. Steve Bibayoff, who works the Free Software Foundation booth, asked me Friday evening if his badge number was any indication of how many people have registered so far. His badge number is a number just south of 3100; by a factor of less than 10. The answer to his question is “yes.”

From: LXer

Google boss warns of ‘forgotten century’ with email and photos at risk

By Ian Sample Piles of digitised material – from blogs, tweets, pictures and videos, to official documents such as court rulings and emails – may be lost forever because the programs needed to view them will become defunct, Google’s vice-president has warned.Humanity’s first steps into the digital world could be lost to future historians, Vint Cerf told the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual meeting in San Jose, California, warning that we faced a “forgotten generation, or even a forgotten century” through what he called “bit rot”, where old computer files become useless junk.

From: LXer

Why All Linux (Security) Bugs Aren’t Shallow

By Sean Michael Kerner “In open source, we put our laundry out to air in the front yard,” Zemlin said.The Code Has EyesZemlin quoted the oft-repeated Linus’ law, which states that given enough eyes all bugs are shallow. That “law” essentially promises that many eyes provide a measure of quality and control and security to open source code. So if Linus’ law is true, Zemlin asked, why are damaging security issues being found now in open source code?

From: LXer

Why one photographer decided to fight a patent on online contests

By Joe Mullin Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) lawyer Daniel Nazer’s Sisyphean task is right in his job title: he’s the Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate Stupid Patents.So when Nazer says he’s seen one of the all-time dumbest patents, that’s saying a lot. Yesterday, Nazer and his fellow EFF lawyer Vera Ranieri filed court papers seeking to invalidate a patent on photo competitions. US Patent No. 8,209,618, owned by a little-known video website called Garfum.com, was used to sue four small photo websites last September that dared to ask people about their favorite photos.

From: LXer