After Years of Abusive E-mails, the Creator of Linux Steps Aside (The New Yorker)

A story in The New Yorker magazine may help explain some of the timing of the recent upheavals in kernel-land. Longtime followers of kernel development will find the article to be a mixed bag—over the top in spots, fairly accurate elsewhere. “Torvalds’s decision to step aside came after The New Yorker asked him a series of questions about his conduct for a story on complaints about his abusive behavior discouraging women from working as Linux-kernel programmers. In a response to The New Yorker, Torvalds said, ‘I am very proud of the Linux code that I invented and the impact it has had on the world. I am not, however, always proud of my inability to communicate well with others—this is a lifelong struggle for me. To anyone whose feelings I have hurt, I am deeply sorry.’

Source: LWN

[$] Resource control at Facebook

Facebook runs a lot of programs and it tries to pack as many as it can onto
each machine. That means running close to—and sometimes beyond—the
resource limits on any given machine. How the system reacts when, for example,
memory is exhausted, makes a big difference in Facebook getting its work
done. Tejun Heo came to 2018
Open Source Summit North America
to describe the resource control
work that has been done by the team he works on at Facebook.

Source: LWN

LLVM 7.0.0 released

Version 7.0.0 of the LLVM compiler suite is out.
It is the result of the community’s work
over the past six months, including: function multiversioning in Clang
with the ‘target’ attribute for ELF-based x86/x86_64 targets, improved
PCH support in clang-cl, preliminary DWARF v5 support, basic support
for OpenMP 4.5 offloading to NVPTX, OpenCL C++ support, MSan, X-Ray
and libFuzzer support for FreeBSD, early UBSan, X-Ray and libFuzzer
support for OpenBSD, UBSan checks for implicit conversions, many
long-tail compatibility issues fixed in lld which is now production
ready for ELF, COFF and MinGW, new tools llvm-exegesis, llvm-mca and
diagtool
“.
The list of new features
is long; see
the
overall release notes
,
the
Clang release notes
,
the
Clang tools release notes
, and
the
LLD linker release notes
for more information.

Source: LWN

[$] Code, conflict, and conduct

A couple of surprising things happened in the kernel community on
September 16: Linus Torvalds announced
that he was taking a break from kernel development to focus on improving
his own behavior, and the longstanding “code of conflict” was replaced
with a code of conduct based on the Contributor
Covenant
. Those two things did not quite come packaged as a set, but
they are clearly not unrelated. It is a
time of change for the kernel project; there will be challenges to overcome
but, in the end, less may change than many expect or fear.

Source: LWN

Security updates for Tuesday

Security updates have been issued by Fedora (ghostscript, icu, nspr, nss, nss-softokn, nss-util, and okular), Red Hat (java-1.7.1-ibm, java-1.8.0-ibm, OpenStack Platform, openstack-neutron, and openstack-nova), and Ubuntu (clamav and php5, php7.0, php7.2).

Source: LWN