Security pros name their must-have tools

LinuxSecurity.com: Secure file sharing is imperative for Lawyers Without Borders, a group that works with volunteer lawyers to advance human rights law in conflict-ridden regions. The nonprofit organization, headquartered in Hartford, Conn., uses Intralinks VIA to protect confidential legal documents and court papers from unsanctioned access.

From: Linux Security

WikiLeaks releases entire trove of Sony Hack including confidential emails

LinuxSecurity.com: Wikileaks has just now released the entire trove from the Sony hack. According to a press release on WikiLeaks, the entire archive which contains 30,287 documents from Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) and 173,132 emails, to and from more than 2,200 SPE email addresses has been leaked because “This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation.

From: Linux Security

To Secure Modern Networks: Close The Visibility Gap

LinuxSecurity.com: Modern networks now go beyond traditional walls to include data centers, endpoints, virtual, mobile and the cloud. These extended networks and their components constantly evolve and span new attack vectors including: mobile devices, web- enabled and mobile applications, hypervisors, social media, web browsers, home computers, and even vehicles.

From: Linux Security

APT group hacks cyber-spy gang in spy-on-spy pwnage

LinuxSecurity.com: Cyber-spy groups, whose numbers are growing with little constraint, have begun hacking each other. Hellsing, a small and technically unremarkable cyber-espionage group, was subjected to a spear-phishing attack by another threat actor last year, before deciding to strike back with its own malware-infected emails.

From: Linux Security

What the Ridiculous F$ck, D-Link?!

LinuxSecurity.com: As mentioned in an update to my post on the HNAP bug in the DIR-890L, the same bug was reported earlier this year in the DIR-645, and a patch was released. D-Link has now released a patch for the DIR-890L as well.

From: Linux Security

What Happens When Personal Information Hits The Dark Web

LinuxSecurity.com: The bait–a trove of phony “stolen” data including several thousand Social Security numbers, credit cards, names, and email addresses–was swallowed within the first few days of being planted in the Dark Web. And when the 12-day experiment was over, the data had traveled to more than 22 different countries and been viewed nearly 1,100 times.

From: Linux Security