Got a Screwdriver? GalliumOS Can Turn Chromebooks Into Linux Boxes


GalliumOS is a Chromebook-specific Linux variant. It lets you put a real Linux distro on a Chromebook. My recent review of a new Chromebook feature — the ability to run Linux apps on some Chromebook models — sparked my interest in other technologies that run complete Linux distros on some Chromebooks without using ChromeOS. GalliumOS is not a perfect solution. It requires making a physical adjustment inside the hardware and flashing new firmware before the GalliumOS installation ISO will boot. However, it can be a handy workaround.

Source: LinuxInsider

Overcoming Your Terror of Arch Linux


A recent episode of a Linux news podcast I keep up with featured an interview with a journalist who had written a piece for a non-Linux audience about giving it a try. It was surprisingly widely read. The writer’s experience with some of the more popular desktop distributions had been overwhelmingly positive, and he said as much in his piece and during the interview. However, when the show’s host asked whether he had tried Arch Linux, the journalist immediately and unequivocally dismissed the idea, as if it were obviously preposterous.

Source: LinuxInsider

How to Protect Your Online Privacy: A Practical Guide


Do you take your online privacy seriously? Most people don’t. They have an ideal scenario of just how private their online activities should be, but they rarely do anything to actually achieve it. The problem is that bad actors know and rely on this fact, and that’s why there’s been a steady rise in identity theft cases from 2013 to 2017. The victims of these cases often suffer a loss of reputation or financial woes. If you take your online privacy seriously, follow this 10-step guide to protect it.

Source: LinuxInsider

Mobile Phone Security: All You Need to Know


We rely on our phones to process and store reams of personal digital data. Our digital activities — from checking bank balances to paying for a product with a tap of the screen, to sending friends and family messages over social media, to accessing work emails remotely — have turned our phones into a goldmine of personal information. It’s likely that by 2020, there will be more than 6 billion smartphone users in the world. How secure is your mobile device? It’s easy to forget that your mobile phone is essentially a pocket-sized computer.

Source: LinuxInsider

Feren OS Delivers Richer Cinnamon Flavor


Feren OS is a nice alternative to Linux Mint and an easy stepping stone to transition to Linux from Microsoft Windows or macOS. I am a long-time user of Linux Mint, but I am falling out of love with it. Mint is getting stale. It is annoyingly sluggish at times. I run it on a number of computers and experience the same symptoms on a variety of hardware configurations. That started me thinking about a suitable replacement distro that runs the Cinnamon desktop with a bit more innovation and flare.

Source: LinuxInsider

Changing Up Your Linux Distro


It’s common for Linux users to hop between distributions and survey the field, and I recently reached a point where I had to seriously rethink the one I was using most of the time. Between hardware compatibility issues with my old standby and some discouraging missteps with other go-to choices, I felt the time had come to reassess my pool of preferred distributions and repopulate it from scratch. As my journey progressed, I realized that as often as I’ve discussed the field of Linux-based systems, I had not addressed how to pick one out.

Source: LinuxInsider

$34B Red Hat Acquisition Is a Bolt Out of Big Blue


The cloud computing landscape presents may look much different to enterprise users following the announcement earlier this week of IBM’s agreement to acquire Red Hat. IBM plans to purchase Red Hat, a major provider of open source cloud software, for $34 billion. IBM will acquire all of the issued and outstanding common shares of Red Hat for $190 per share in cash, under terms of the deal. That stock purchase represents a total enterprise value of approximately $34 billion. Red Hat will join IBM’s Hybrid Cloud team as a distinct unit.

Source: LinuxInsider

Open Source Software: 20-Plus Years of Innovation


Open source led to a new software development and distribution model that offered an alternative to proprietary software. No single event takes the prize for starting the technology revolution. However, Feb. 3, 1998, is one of the more significant dates. On that day, Christine Peterson, a futurist and lecturer in the field of nanotechnology, coined the “open source” term at a strategy session in Palo Alto, California, shortly after the release of the Netscape browser source code. Numerous other events contributed to driving the movement.

Source: LinuxInsider

Another Milestone Achieved: Run Linux Apps on a Chromebook


Linux apps now can run in a Chromebook’s Chrome OS environment. However, the process can be tricky, and it depends on your hardware’s design and Google’s whims. It is somewhat similar to running Android apps on your Chromebook, but the Linux connection is far less forgiving. If it works in your Chromebook’s flavor, though, the computer becomes much more useful with more flexible options. Still, running Linux apps on a Chromebook will not replace the Chrome OS. The apps run in an isolated virtual machine without a Linux desktop.

Source: LinuxInsider

2nd New MakuluLinux Release Offers Flash and Substance


The MakuluLinux Flash distro is splashy and fast with a spiffy new look and new features. MakuluLinux developer Jacque Montague Raymer just announced the second of this year’s three major Series 15 releases. The Flash edition follows last month’s LinDoz edition release. The much-awaited innovative Core edition will debut between the end of November and mid-December. MakuluLinux is a relatively new Linux OS. Its positive reputation has been developing since 2015. The three-year growth spurt involved a variety of desktop environments.

Source: LinuxInsider