The Future of Open Source


Linux and the open source business model are far different today than many of the early developers might have hoped. Neither can claim a rags-to-riches story. Rather, their growth cycles have been a series of hit-or-miss milestones. The Linux desktop has yet to find a home on the majority of consumer and enterprise computers. However, Linux-powered technology has long ruled the Internet and conquered the cloud and Internet of Things deployments. Both Linux and free open source licensing have dominated in other ways.

Source: LinuxInsider

Android Apps Riskier Than Ever: Report


Widespread use of unpatched open source code in the most popular Android apps distributed by Google Play has caused significant security vulnerabilities, suggests an American Consumer Institute report. Thirty-two percent — or 105 apps out of 330 of the most popular apps in 16 categories sampled — averaged 19 vulnerabilities per app, according to the report. Researchers found critical vulnerabilities in many common applications, including some of the most popular banking, event ticket purchasing, sports and travel apps.

Source: LinuxInsider

Cinnamon Mint for Debian Just as Tasty


The official release of version 3 of Linux Mint Debian Edition hit the download servers at summer’s end, offering a subtle alternative to the distro’s Ubuntu-based counterpart. Codenamed “Cindy,” the new version of LMDE is based on Debian 9 Stretch and features the Cinnamon desktop environment. Its release creates an unusual situation in the world of Linux distro competition. Linux Mint developers seem to be in competition with themselves. LMDE is an experimental release. The Linux Mint community offers its flagship distro based on Ubuntu Linux in three desktop versions: Cinnamon, Mate and Xfce.

Source: LinuxInsider

Enlightenment Has Limits in Bodhi Linux


Bodhi Linux is an alternative to traditional Linux OSes that can change your desktop user experience. It is one of a very few Linux distros using Moksha, a forked version of the Enlightenment desktop. Enlightenment is a Compositing Window Manager and Desktop Shell. It is radically different from other lightweight interface shells such as Xfce and LXDE. Its roots go back to 1996, when it started out as a project to build a Window Manager for X11. That project has started to transition to Wayland.

Source: LinuxInsider

Quirky Linux: Pleasingly Peculiar


Quirky Linux is a classic example of what makes Linux such a varied and useful operating system. Puppy Linux developer Barry Kauler earlier this month released Quirky Xerus 64 version 8.6, which comes packed with the latest innovations for doing Linux stuff differently. This latest in the “Xerus” series is a must-try if you like to push your computing experience envelope. It offers a slightly different approach to blending a traditional Linux desktop with the latest in usability options.

Source: LinuxInsider

Oracle Open-Sources GraphPipe to Support ML Development


Oracle has open-sourced GraphPipe to enhance machine learning applications. The project’s goal is to improve deployment results for machine learning models, noted Project Leader Vish Abrams. That process includes creating an open standard. The company has a questionable relationship with open source developers, so its decision to open-source GraphPipe might not receive a flood of interest. Oracle hopes developers will rally behind the project to simplify and standardize the deployment of machine learning models.

Source: LinuxInsider

New LibreOffice Version Offers Fresh Take


The Document Foundation has announced the availability of its second major release this year, LibreOffice Fresh 6.1, with enhanced editing on Desktop, Cloud and Mobile platforms. One of its most significant new features is Notebookbar, an improved experimental user interface option that resembles the ribbon interface popular with Microsoft Office users. The developers hope to release a fully refined ribbon-style interface in the next major release, according to Italo Vignoli, spokesperson for the foundation.

Source: LinuxInsider

ExTiX 18.7 Is Not Quite an ‘Ultimate Linux System’


The latest release of the ExTiX Linux distro is a major disappointment. ExTiX 18.7 has several shortcomings that make it troublesome to use. The flaws easily might be fixed in a patched follow-up release. Still, to a new Linux user, the problems inherent in ExTiX 18.7 give the Linux OS in general a black eye. New releases of any software platform never come with guarantees. Sometimes, an earlier release works almost flawlessly while its upgrade down the line fails to impress. That was my experience revisiting the ExTix distro.

Source: LinuxInsider

FreeOffice Suite Is Almost Blue Ribbon-Worthy


SoftMaker’s FreeOffice 2018 Linux office suite is a high-end product that provides performance and compatibility with Microsoft Office and other office suites. FreeOffice 2018 is a free version that is nearly identical to the features and user interface of Softmaker’s commercial flagship office suite, SoftMaker Office 2018. The FreeOffice 2018 suite is a capable alternative to its commercial upgrade. It poses little trouble reading and writing to other document formats and provides very accurate page rendering when importing/exporting.

Source: LinuxInsider

Google Adds Kubernetes to Rebranded Cloud Marketplace


Google has announced the rebranding and expansion of its Cloud Launcher platform. Going forward, it will be known as the “Google Cloud Platform Marketplace,” or “GCP Marketplace.” It will offer production-ready commercial Kubernetes apps, promising simplified deployment, billing and third-party licensing. Google’s goal is to make containers accessible to everyone, especially the enterprise, said Anil Dhawan, product manager for the Google Cloud Platform. Google’s hosted Kubernetes Engine takes care of cluster orchestration and management.

Source: LinuxInsider