The Linux Foundation Brings Network Automation and Cloud Native Communities Together as Network Functions evolve to CNFs

Leading open source communities spearhead migration from Virtual Network Functions to Cloud-native Network Functions

AMSTERDAM – Open Networking Summit Europe Sept. 25, 2018 The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced further collaboration between telecom and cloud industry leaders enabled by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and LF Networking (LFN), fueling migrations of Virtual Network Function (VNFs) to Cloud-native Network Functions (CNFs).

As networks evolve to support next-generation services and applications, they will need to embrace characteristics inherent to cloud native architecture, such as scalability, automation, and resiliency. Compared to traditional VNFs (network functions encapsulated in a Virtual Machine (VM) running in a virtualized environment on OpenStack or VMware, for example), CNFs (network functions running on Kubernetes on public, private, or hybrid cloud environments) are lighter weight and faster to instantiate. Container-based processes are also easier to scale, chain, heal, move and back up.

Two of the fastest-growing Linux Foundation projects – ONAP (part of LF Networking) and Kubernetes (part of CNCF) – are coming together in next-generation telecom architecture as operators evolve their VNFs into CNFs running on Kubernetes.

“We have seen service providers embrace open source networking in large numbers. Benefits of virtualization and VNFs, coupled with automation platforms like ONAP, are now de-facto deployment models,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, networking, The Linux Foundation. “As edge, IoT, 5G and AI start using these highly-automated cloud platforms, we are excited to see the best of both worlds come together the scale and portability of cloud coupled with the agility, reliability and automation of telecom.”

“I’m thrilled to collaborate with our sister Linux Foundation organization, LF Networking, to demonstrate the capabilities of CNFs,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director of Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “These implementations will bring greater elasticity to the networking space through critical pieces of the cloud native stack – like container orchestration, service mesh architectures and microservices – and allow for a new level of self-management and scalability.”

Early examples of both VNF and CNF enablement are seen within ONAP and via working projects from the CNCF and ONAP communities. ONAP’s inaugural release, Amsterdam, represents the second stage (2.0) of network architecture evolution: it runs in a VM, in an OpenStack, VMware, Azure or Rackspace environment. ONAP’s upcoming release, Casablanca, brings the next phase of network architecture evolution (3.0): it runs on Kubernetes, and works on any public, private, or hybrid cloud. ONAP currently supports VNFs on either VMs (running on OpenStack or VMware) or containers (running on Kubernetes via KubeVirt or Virtlet).

Specific projects addressing the migration roadmap to cloud native include:

    • LFN ONAP Multi-VIM: Aims to enable ONAP to deploy and run on multiple infrastructure environments, for example: OpenStack and its different distributions; public and private clouds; microservices containers, etc.
    • LFN ONAP OOM: Enables ONAP modules to be run on Kubernetes, contributing to availability, resilience, scalability and more for ONAP deployments and sets the stage for full implementation of a microservices architecture, expected with the third release, Casablanca, due out later this year.
    • OPNFV: The latest OPNFV release, Fraser, expanded cloud native NFV capabilities in nine different projects, more than doubled the number of supported Kubernetes-based scenarios, deployed two containerized VNFs, and integrated additional cloud native technologies from CNCF relating to service mesh (Istio/Envoy), logging (Fluentd), tracing (OpenTracing with Jaeger), monitoring (Prometheus), and package management (gRPC). These updates move the cloud native capabilities from basic container orchestration to include operational needs for cloud native applications. Additionally, the FastDataStacks project takes advantage of FD.io work to incorporate the VPP dataplane into Kubernetes networking capabilities to enable cloud native network-centric services.
    • CNCF Cross-cloud Continuous Integration (CI): Ensures cross-project interoperability and cross-cloud deployments of all cloud native technologies; shows the daily status of builds and deployments on a status dashboard.
    • Istio: Allows users to connect, manage, and secure microservices for both containerized and non-containerized workloads.

 

  • Ligato: Provides a platform and code samples for development of cloud native VNFs. It includes a VNF agent for Vector Packet Processing (FD.io) and a Service Function Chain (SFC) controller for stitching virtual and physical networking.
  • (Network) Service Mesh: A novel approach solving complicated L2/L3 use cases in Kubernetes that are tricky to address with the existing Kubernetes Network Model. Inspired by Istio, Network Service Mesh maps the concept of a service mesh to L2/L3 payloads.

 

As telecom network transformation requires a hybrid approach, service providers will be better equipped to deliver next-gen services by realizing the full promise of containers, utilizing the best of both telecom and cloud. Combined with open source, ecosystem-wide benefits include portability, resiliency, reduced capex and opex, increased development velocity, automation, and scalability.  

Supporting Quotes

“Containerization has been one of the cornerstones of our network transformation,” said Catherine Lefevre, AVP of Research Technology Management, AT&T. “Cloud-native development represents the next level of efficiency as part of the ONAP target architecture and we’re excited to be a part of this initiative. We expect significant benefits from the OOM Project, such as improved scalability and resiliency, as well as additional cost efficiencies.”

“Cloud-native NFV delivers on the agility, velocity and cost savings promised so many years ago in the NFV manifesto. We are at the cusp of solving the two major blockers: VNF→ CNF transition, and a cloud-native way to wire the CNFs together in Kubernetes,” said David Ward, CTO and chief architect of Engineering, Cisco. “VPP provides the feature rich high performance userspace dataplane needed for CNFs, Ligato provides the toolkit for building the CNF agents to manage the VPP dataplane, and Network Service Mesh provides a truly ‘cloud-native’ approach to how to stitch CNFs together. We look forward to seeing the good work in these areas at Kubecon in Seattle in December.”

What’s Next?

As migrations of VNFs to CNFs continue to evolve, the open source networking ecosystem enters the next phase of innovation, ‘Harmonization 3.0.’ The next phase (Harmonization 3.0) drives collaboration between edge and carrier cloud and enterprise. First introduced at Open Networking Summit North America, this joint effort will enhance the open networking ecosystem. Further advancements of these efforts will be on display at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America (December 10-13, 2018) in Seattle. To learn more and register for the event, visit here.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

 

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Resources

 

Media Contact

Jill Lovato

The Linux Foundation

jlovato@linuxfoundation.org

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Source: Linux Foundation

Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds

New survey indicates growing maturity, remarkable innovation of open source use among operators

AMSTERDAM – Open Networking Summit Europe Sept. 25, 2018 The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the results of an industry survey to gauge industry perceptions of open source across networking technologies. Top takeaways from the survey indicate an increasing maturity of open source technology use from operators, ongoing innovation in areas such as DevOps and CI/CD,  and a glimpse into emerging technologies in areas such as cloud native and more.

 

Conducted by Heavy Reading, the multi-client survey spanning six segments across networking  technologies – DevOps, automation, cloud native, big data and analytics, open networking performance, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO)  indicates continued and increasing importance of open source software for network transformation. Key findings indicate CSPs show an unexpected level of sophistication around new technologies and approaches, including adoption of open networking solutions in numerous domains and active automation of processes across operations.

“From the number of CSPs expecting open source to be a critical component of next-gen networks, to the growing importance of emerging technologies like DevOps and cloud native, it’s encouraging to see open source continue to mature and watch real progress unfold,” said Heather Kirksey, Vice President, Ecosystem and Community, LFN.

Executed in collaboration with sponsors Affirmed/Intel, Amdocs, CloudOps, Ericsson, Netgate and Red Hat, the survey includes responses from 150 CSP representatives across 98 discrete companies worldwide. Bringing an unprecedented look at operator perceptions and experience of open source networking technologies, the survey delivers a comprehensive look at the state of open source in networking today.

Key findings indicate:

Growing Importance and Maturity of Open Source

  • Combined with an overwhelming confidence in open source performance,98 percent of CSPs are confident that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions. CSPs are increasingly leveraging open source software in production:  
    • 69 percent are using open source networking solutions in production networks, signaling a real staying power.
  • SDN in particular is seeing strong deployment, with nearly 60 percent of CSPs reporting they have either already deployed SDN (39 percent), or are currently trialing SDN (20 percent).
    • Open source is key to SDN solutions; 86 percent of respondents indicated it’s important that the SDN products their company uses are open source.

Remarkable Innovation: DevOps & CI/CD

  • With 77 percent of respondents seeing DevOps as either essential (41 percent) or important (36 percent) to the long-term success of service delivery at their company, the survey indicates focus has shifted from whether to adopt this approach to the more operational elements of how and when to best roll it out.
  • While the stage at which CSPs are in their DevOps journey is split, an impressive 67 percent have implemented some aspect of DevOps and 22 percent are evaluating DevOps tool chains and methodologies. Less than 1 percent have no plans to adopt DevOps.

On the Horizon: Cloud native and Infrastructure as Code (IaC)

  • While open source is reaching a new level of maturity among telcos generally, some strategies are still being defined among more emerging technologies:
    • Cloud native – the journey towards cloud native network functions (CNFs) is in the early stages.
      • Only 5 percent have already adopted Kubernetes and are running production workloads on it, including VNFs/CNFs.
      • Another 34 percent say they are considering adopting Kubernetes/OpenShift but haven’t yet.
  • Infrastructure as Code (IaC) strategies are still developing, with 35 percent of CPS respondents considering adopting Infrastructure as Code (IaC) while 22 percent have adopted but are working through challenges

The survey findings show open source has become core to the ways in which service providers are reinventing their networks and basic assumptions on how networks are managed has evolved. The journey so far has come with both successes and challenges that LFN, with collaboration from its membership and broader community, is committed to helping resolve.  

More details on how operators are seizing the opportunity to transform every aspect of their networks through virtualization, automation, big data analytics, cloud-native principles, MANO and SDN will be investigated over the coming weeks and months. In the interim, initial findings are available here.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contact

Jill Lovato

The Linux Foundation

jlovato@linuxfoundation.org

The post Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Source: Linux Foundation

Tune Into the Free Live Stream of Keynotes at Open Networking Summit Europe, September 25-27!

ONS livestream

Watch the keynote sessions LIVE next week at ONS Europe!

Open Networking Summit Europe is taking place in Amsterdam next week,  September 25-27. Can’t make it? You’ll be missed, but you don’t have to miss out on the action. Tune into the free livestream to catch all of the keynotes live from your desktop, tablet or phone! Sign Up Now >>

Live video streaming of the keynote sessions from Open Networking Summit Europe 2018 will take place during the following times:

Tuesday, September 25

13:15 – 14:55 (CEST)

Watch keynotes from Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Red Hat, China Mobile, Intel, Orange Group Network and The Linux Foundation.

Wednesday, September 26

9:00 – 10:30 (CEST)

Watch keynotes from Türk Telekom, IBM, IHS/Infonetics Research, Huawei, China Mobile, and Vodafone Group.

Thursday, September 27

9:00 – 10:35 (CEST)

Watch keynotes from Deutsche Telekom AG, Imperial College London, China Mobile, AT&T, and Amdocs, Huawei, VMware and The Linux Foundation.

View the full Keynote Session Schedule

Sign up for free live stream now >>

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Source: Linux Foundation

Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150

Register now to save $150 for Open Source Summit EU in Edinburgh.

You have TWO days left to save $150 on your ticket to Open Source Summit Europe & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

Grab your ticket and build your schedule today! Choose from 300+ sessions, deep-dive labs, and tutorials; discover new projects & technologies in the Technical Showcase, and make new connections at the Attendee Reception, and in the Speed Networking & Mentoring Event, Developer Lounges, and Hallway Tracks.

Register now, and join 2,000+ open source professionals to collaborate, share information, and learn about cutting-edge open source technologies.

The discount ends Saturday, September 22.

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit Europe: 

REGISTER & SAVE $150 »

Registration includes access to Open Source Summit Europe and ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe!

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Source: Linux Foundation

Tungsten Fabric Launches Carbide Quick Start Environment on AWS

New users can now get started with an open source scalable, multicloud, multistack SDN networking platform in 15 minutes

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2018 — Linux Foundation Networking project, Tungsten Fabric, has launched a quick-start environment hosted at Amazon Web Services, targeting developers working with Kubernetes who have limited networking experience.

Making Tungsten Fabric easier to consume is a primary goal of the community. Users can easily deploy a configuration-free Kubernetes and Tungsten Fabric cluster in less than 15 minutes, based on average deployment times. There is no charge to use the quick start environment—called Carbide—beyond the AWS resources users consume running their deployments.

Software-Defined Networking is complex, and the Tungsten Fabric community developed Carbide to make getting started easier. Carbide demonstrates Tungsten Fabric’s public cloud and Kubernetes capabilities, and it provides a quick way for software developers using Kubernetes to get started with production-grade SDN on public cloud. Kubernetes operators and developers who need a full-featured SDN controller and want to start using Tungsten Fabric can stand up an environment quickly with their own AWS credentials.

*** Join us at ONS Europe in Amsterdam for presentations, demos, workshops and an evening Meetup to learn more about Tungsten Fabric and get engaged with the community. https://tungsten.io/join-the-tungsten-fabric-community-at-ons-2018-in-amsterdam.***

With the Carbide Quick Start Environment developers can:

  • Create a production-grade environment for development and testing of Tungsten Fabric
  • Evaluate the Tungsten and Kubernetes integration
  • Use the CloudFormation template as a baseline for building demos or proof of concept systems
  • Perform Tungsten Fabric scalability testing with no limits
  • Run a variety of performance tests simply by changing instance types and configuration parameters
  • Develop self-guided proof of concepts
  • Runn a true cloud-grade networking solution for Kubernetes

About Tungsten Fabric

Tungsten Fabric is an open source, scalable, multicloud, multistack networking platform. It provides a single point of control, observability and analytics for networking and security. Tungsten Fabric is integrated with private cloud stacks including Kubernetes, VMware and OpenStack. It also supports hybrid deployments with public clouds including AWS and GCE. More at https://tungsten.io.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jill Lovato

The Linux Foundation

jlovato@linuxfoundation.org

The post Tungsten Fabric Launches Carbide Quick Start Environment on AWS appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Source: Linux Foundation

How IBM Is Using Open Source for a Greater Good

Call for Code

Learn more about IBM’s open source initiatives, including the Call for Code.

Dr. Angel Diaz is the face of open source at IBM as Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy. At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, we spoke with Diaz to talk about the importance of open source at IBM and how it’s changing the world around us.

LF: What’s the importance of open source in modern economy?

Angel Diaz: We are living in a technology-fueled business renaissance — cloud, data, artificial intelligence, and the redefinition of the transaction. There is constant democratization of technology. This democratization allows us as computer scientists to innovate higher orders of the stack. You don’t have to worry about compute, storage and network; you get that in the cloud for example, but what has been driving that democratization? Open source.

Angel Diaz, Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy, IBM (Image copyright: Swapnil Bhartiya)

Open source has been the fuel, the innovation engine, the skills engine, the level playing field that allows us as a society to build more, to build faster and move forward and the rate and pace of that is increasing.

What’s really nice about that is we are doing it in a controlled way with open governance and leveraging the all the work that we do in consortia such as the Linux Foundation.

LF: Today, open source has become so pervasive that the question isn’t who is using it, but who is not using it. Can you point to some moments in history that changed everything and the industry realized that this is the right path for innovation, collaboration, and development?

Diaz: That’s a great question. I think there are two such moments. I addressed it in my talk here. The first such moment was in the late eighties, early nineties when, as an industry, we came together and rallied around things like Linux, Apache, Eclipse.

Our products have upwards of 75 percent open source. We are not leeches; we contribute as much as we use. Back in the nineties, we protected open source with intellectual property. It fueled innovation as it gave people the permission and freedom to go ahead and contribute without any worry.

That’s a pivot point number one. Time occurred and a lot of stardust happened. Over the past 10 years or so, we started to create centers of gravity around cloud data, artificial intelligence, transactions and so on.

These centers of gravity came together in consortia with open governance models. This is really important because what that allowed us to do was to create an open architecture and open cloud architecture.

There is one more moment, the third moment where we are now. It’s about individuals. The individual really matters and there are so many new computer scientists across a diverse set of underrepresented groups that it’s exploding.

How we behave in open source is important and that boils down to being a mentor for others. It’s around code, content, and community. So I think the next renaissance of open source is going to be grounded in our ability to connect those three things and help people celebrate their education process, their ability to connect with others like them to be mentored. And then conduct mentoring themselves.

LF: While everything looks rosy, there are some challenges.  Can you elaborate?

Diaz: Nothing is ever rosy. There’s always a lot of work as blood, sweat, and tears – the individual contributor doing the pull requests, submitting code. It’s a lot of work. If we can stick to the company side of the equation, I see organizations think that open source is something that they monetize quickly and that’s not the reality. It’s about creating an ecosystem where everybody monetizes. People need to understand the difference between a real open source, which is a meritocracy based system where everybody can contribute, vs closed source where an organization controls everything tightly. Open source is about open governance – it is not about controlling the commit process.

LF: Once in a while, we see the case of open source companies trying to change the license to survive, as they try to monetize quickly. Do you worry that we might go backward and return to proprietary software?

Diaz: No, I don’t think so. I think the process is pretty well understood, and organizations that adopt the open governance model are successful. I think there’s enough momentum. It’s just a matter of companies understanding how to behave in that world.

LF: How important is open source for IBM?

Diaz: Open source has been in our DNA for a long time, probably more than any other company that I know of. I joined IBM in the mid-nineties at IBM research. I got involved with open source in the early days working with Tim Berners-Lee on web standards. I worked on Linux and many other open source projects. Open source is how we like to create ecosystems and skills. That’s how we drive innovation for our clients helping them to be more productive.

LF: Does open source have any impact beyond the IT world?

Diaz: Yes. In fact, just recently IBM partnered up with United Nations Human Rights, The American Red Cross, and The Linux Foundation to launch something called Call for Code.

It’s not just about the code; it’s about how you use the code for good. We have launched a worldwide hack which ends on September 28, 2018. There’s still time to participate. But Call for Code is the place where developers can submit code and win a contest for good. This year we’re preparing for disasters. It is from what I can see the world’s largest hack ever, and it’s focused for the greater good. I think that really puts a good light on open source

LF: So it’s not coding for the sake of coding, it’s for some greater good?

Diaz: Exactly. Think about it. We are going to put the winning entries into production. If its an app, or whatever gets built, saves one life, it’s worth it. It’ll probably save tens, hundreds, maybe thousands of lives.

IBM has committed to the project for five years. It’s just been incredible to see tens of thousands of developers registering, participating and being part of this endeavor. It doesn’t matter if you’re a developer or a data scientist or even if you’re just a subject matter expert or someone who cares about preparing for disasters, sign up and register because teams are forming. Someone may need somebody who is a professional on hurricanes, you can help. The best teams that I know of are multidisciplinary. It’s not just for developers. Join!

This article was sponsored by IBM and written by The Linux Foundation.

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Source: Linux Foundation

Open Source Networking Days Returning This Fall

OSN Days

OSN Days are a series of one-day events to facilitate F2F collaboration. Tours this fall cover China, APAC, and North America starting October 12.

As we gear up the for the first ever Open Networking Summit Europe event, Amsterdam, September 25-27, it’s becoming clear to me just how far we’ve come this year since the formation of LF Networking. With new major operators joining, like Deutsche Telekom, and others requiring open source project automation tools in their RFPs, like Orange, it’s inspiring to witness just how much the networking industry is rallying around open source and incorporating it as a key element of their business strategies. It’s great to see LF Networking recognized for its role in bringing the ecosystem together, and to see open source community contribution increasingly recognized as driving increased business value.

At The Linux Foundation, we believe strongly in face-to-face collaboration. For those who can’t make it to Amsterdam this time, I wanted to share the good news that the next three Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days) tours will be coming this fall to China, APAC, and North America. Here are confirmed cities and dates so far. Click on the links to learn more and register. Check back soon to main OSN Days website for updates on the others.

China: Shanghai: Oct 12 | Nanjing: Oct 15 | Beijing: Oct 17

APAC: Singapore: Oct 15 | Taiwan: (Hsinchu): Oct 17 | Tokyo: Oct 23

North America: Ottawa: Oct 30 | Bay Area: Nov 1 | Dallas: Nov 6 | Toronto: Nov 8 | Boston: Nov 19 | Montreal: Nov 29 | Austin: TBD

Launched last year, OSN Days is a series of regional, one-day events hosted and organized by local open source networking ecosystem members — including industry, service providers, academia, and start-ups — with support from LF Networking and its projects: FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, SNAS, and Tungsten Fabric. Attendees will hear from a roster of expert speakers on the state of the industry; the projects that make up the open source networking stack, the integration points between them, the use cases and business opportunities enabled by network transformation, how to get involved, and much more. This is also a great chance to hear directly from — and engage directly with — operators such as AT&T, China Mobile, China Telecom, China Telecom, and Reliance Jio.

There is no cost to attend and I invite you to register today. If you have any questions, or would like to host an event in the future, please email osndays@linuxfoundation.org.

Whether at ONS Europe, OSN Days, or the other industry events and meetups on our calendar, we hope to get the chance to meet with you soon and build upon the great work we’ve started. It’s a good time to be in networking.

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Source: Linux Foundation

Linux Foundation’s OpenDaylight Fluorine Release Brings Streamlined Support for Cloud, Edge and WAN Solutions

Most pervasive open source SDN controller issues ninth platform release as more users and open source platforms leverage OpenDaylight Project to achieve promise of SDN/NFV

SAN FRANCISCO, September 13, 2018–The OpenDaylight Project, the leading open source platform for programmable, software-defined networks, today announced its ninth release, OpenDaylight Fluorine. The latest version brings major advancements for solution providers through key enhancements to the platform, including simplified packaging to speed solution development and enhanced capabilities for key use cases.

“Fluorine is one of the most streamlined releases to date for OpenDaylight, delivering a core set of mature components needed for most major use cases in a ‘managed release’ for easy consumption by commercial and in-house solution providers, as well as by downstream projects such as ONAP and OpenStack,” said Phil Robb, vice president, Operations, Networking, and Orchestration, The Linux Foundation. In addition, the release includes critical updates to clustering and service assurance to improve scalability, security and reliability to support our large end user deployments – including solutions from Cornell University, Globo.com, Orange,  Tencent, and others using all OpenDaylight to further their open networking initiatives.”

OpenDaylight is also seeing ongoing industry momentum as more users deploy the platform to realize the power of open SDN/NFV.  For example, Globo.com, a leading internet-related services and platforms company based in Brazil, is using OpenDaylight as their primary SDN controller platform. A new case study details the benefits the company is seeing from using OpenDaylight to deploy ACLs on virtual switches. FRINX has demonstrated customer success stories with its OpenDaylight Distribution together with SoftBank and China Telecom BRI while Red Hat’s new functional release in Red Hat OpenStack Platform (OSP) version 13 also features OpenDaylight.

OpenDaylight’s latest release includes new features important for cloud and edge environments, service function chaining, WAN connectivity, and optical transport. More details on what’s new in OpenDaylight Fluorine are outlined below.

Enhanced Functionality for Key SDN  Use Cases

 

  • WAN Connectivity. Fluorine includes an extremely mature and robust BGP stack, with improvements in BGPCEP and BGP/MPLS multicast support, making OpenDaylight a clear leader in SD-WAN innovation.
  • Optical Transport. Work on optical transport, including the TransportPCE project, has been nurtured within OpenDaylight for some time. Fluorine formally releases Transport PCE for the first time, as a component of the managed release. In addition, Fluorine  provides a new reference implementation for OpenROADM-based optical infrastructures control.
  • Cloud/edge Computing. Several new features were added to further enhance support for network virtualization within cloud and edge computing environments. This includes improved IPv6 support, support for both stateful and stateless security groups, and SR-IOV hardware offload for OVS. Much of this work has been developed for OpenStack environments, and is now being leveraged to integrate ODL with the Container Orchestration Engine for Kubernetes environments.  
  • Service Function Chaining (SFC). Updates to SFC accelerate delivery of services like network slicing, now supported by OpenvSwitch (OVS), allowing for improved adoption of SFC in the marketplace.

 

Increased Stability and Reliability

The OpenDaylight Fluorine release brings improvements in stability and scale, including complex bug fixes and enhancements to OpenDaylight infrastructure clustering capability. In addition, the new managed release process facilitates more thorough integration testing of the mature components, ensuring that release as a whole operates seamlessly.

Continued Cross-Community Integration

OpenDaylight continued its deep engagement with other open source projects and standards bodies such as OpenStack, OPNFV, Kubernetes, and ONAP. Notably, ODL code is integrated into OPNFV’s CI/CD toolchain, which slashes the time it takes the OPNFV community to provide feedback to ODL contributors from months to days.

Looking Ahead

The OpenDaylight project is hosting a Developer Forum in Amsterdam from September 23-24, in advance of the next platform release, Neon. The Neon release is expected in early 2019. Additional information and registration details can be found here.

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Additional Resources

 

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Source: Linux Foundation

Top 10 Reasons to Join the Premier European Open Source Event of the Year | Register Now to Save $150

open source event

Don’t miss Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, October 22 – 24 in Edinburgh.

See why you need to be at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe next month! Hurry — space is going quickly. Secure your spot and register by September 22 to save $150.

Here are the Top 10 Reasons you’ll want to be at this event:

  1. Timely Cutting-edge Content: 300+ sessions on Linux development, embedded Linux systems, IoT, cloud native development, cloud infrastructure, AI, blockchain and open source program management & community leadership.
  2. Deep Dive Labs & Tutorials: An Introduction to Linux Control Groups (cgroups),  Building Kubernetes Native Apps with the Operator Framework, Resilient and Fast Persistent Container Storage Leveraging Linux’s Storage Functionalities,  and 10 Years of Linux Containers, are just some of the labs and tutorials included in one low registration price.
  3. 12 Co-located Events*: Come for OSS & ELC + OpenIoT Summit and stay for LF Energy Summit, Linux Security Summit, Cloud & Container Embedded Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, IoT Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, Hyperledger Scotland Meetup, Linux in Safety-Critical Systems Summit, and many more co-located events.  (*Some co-located events may require an additional registration fee.)
  4. Discover New Projects & Technologies: Over 30 sponsors will be showcasing new projects and technologies in the Sponsor Showcase throughout the event, joined by our Technical Showcase at the Onsite Attendee reception showcasing Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects from system developers and hardware makers.
  5. Social Activities & Evening Events: Take a break and go on a sightseeing bus tour, join the 5K fun run or morning meditation, and meet with fellow attendees through the networking app. Collaborate with fellow attendees at the attendee reception at the National Museum of Scotland and at the Onsite Attendee Reception & Sponsor + Technical Showcase.
  6. Diversity Empowerment Summit: Explore ways to advance diversity and inclusion in the community and across the technology industry.
  7. Women in Open Source Lunch &  Better Together Diversity Social: Women and non-binary members of the open source community are invited to network with each other at the lunch sponsored by Adobe, while all underrepresented minorities are welcome to attend the at the Better Together Diversity Social.
  8. Developer & Hallway Track Lounge: The highlight for many at this event is the ability to collaborate with the open source community. This dedicated lounge offers a space for developers to hack and collaborate throughout the event as well as plenty of seating for hallway track discussions.
  9. Networking Opportunities: Attend the Speed Networking & Mentoring event, OS Career Mixer, or use the networking app to expand your open source community connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests.
  10. Hear from the Leading Technologists in Open Source: Keynote talks include a Linux Kernel update, a fireside chat with Linus Torvalds & Dirk Hohndel, a look at the future of AI and Deep Learning, a panel discussion on the future of energy with open source, a discussion on diversity & inclusion, a talk on the parallels between open source & video games, and insightful talks on how open source is changing banking, human rights and scientific collaboration

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Source: Linux Foundation