How IBM Is Using Open Source for a Greater Good

Call for Code

Learn more about IBM’s open source initiatives, including the Call for Code.

Dr. Angel Diaz is the face of open source at IBM as Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy. At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, we spoke with Diaz to talk about the importance of open source at IBM and how it’s changing the world around us.

LF: What’s the importance of open source in modern economy?

Angel Diaz: We are living in a technology-fueled business renaissance — cloud, data, artificial intelligence, and the redefinition of the transaction. There is constant democratization of technology. This democratization allows us as computer scientists to innovate higher orders of the stack. You don’t have to worry about compute, storage and network; you get that in the cloud for example, but what has been driving that democratization? Open source.

Angel Diaz, Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy, IBM (Image copyright: Swapnil Bhartiya)

Open source has been the fuel, the innovation engine, the skills engine, the level playing field that allows us as a society to build more, to build faster and move forward and the rate and pace of that is increasing.

What’s really nice about that is we are doing it in a controlled way with open governance and leveraging the all the work that we do in consortia such as the Linux Foundation.

LF: Today, open source has become so pervasive that the question isn’t who is using it, but who is not using it. Can you point to some moments in history that changed everything and the industry realized that this is the right path for innovation, collaboration, and development?

Diaz: That’s a great question. I think there are two such moments. I addressed it in my talk here. The first such moment was in the late eighties, early nineties when, as an industry, we came together and rallied around things like Linux, Apache, Eclipse.

Our products have upwards of 75 percent open source. We are not leeches; we contribute as much as we use. Back in the nineties, we protected open source with intellectual property. It fueled innovation as it gave people the permission and freedom to go ahead and contribute without any worry.

That’s a pivot point number one. Time occurred and a lot of stardust happened. Over the past 10 years or so, we started to create centers of gravity around cloud data, artificial intelligence, transactions and so on.

These centers of gravity came together in consortia with open governance models. This is really important because what that allowed us to do was to create an open architecture and open cloud architecture.

There is one more moment, the third moment where we are now. It’s about individuals. The individual really matters and there are so many new computer scientists across a diverse set of underrepresented groups that it’s exploding.

How we behave in open source is important and that boils down to being a mentor for others. It’s around code, content, and community. So I think the next renaissance of open source is going to be grounded in our ability to connect those three things and help people celebrate their education process, their ability to connect with others like them to be mentored. And then conduct mentoring themselves.

LF: While everything looks rosy, there are some challenges.  Can you elaborate?

Diaz: Nothing is ever rosy. There’s always a lot of work as blood, sweat, and tears – the individual contributor doing the pull requests, submitting code. It’s a lot of work. If we can stick to the company side of the equation, I see organizations think that open source is something that they monetize quickly and that’s not the reality. It’s about creating an ecosystem where everybody monetizes. People need to understand the difference between a real open source, which is a meritocracy based system where everybody can contribute, vs closed source where an organization controls everything tightly. Open source is about open governance – it is not about controlling the commit process.

LF: Once in a while, we see the case of open source companies trying to change the license to survive, as they try to monetize quickly. Do you worry that we might go backward and return to proprietary software?

Diaz: No, I don’t think so. I think the process is pretty well understood, and organizations that adopt the open governance model are successful. I think there’s enough momentum. It’s just a matter of companies understanding how to behave in that world.

LF: How important is open source for IBM?

Diaz: Open source has been in our DNA for a long time, probably more than any other company that I know of. I joined IBM in the mid-nineties at IBM research. I got involved with open source in the early days working with Tim Berners-Lee on web standards. I worked on Linux and many other open source projects. Open source is how we like to create ecosystems and skills. That’s how we drive innovation for our clients helping them to be more productive.

LF: Does open source have any impact beyond the IT world?

Diaz: Yes. In fact, just recently IBM partnered up with United Nations Human Rights, The American Red Cross, and The Linux Foundation to launch something called Call for Code.

It’s not just about the code; it’s about how you use the code for good. We have launched a worldwide hack which ends on September 28, 2018. There’s still time to participate. But Call for Code is the place where developers can submit code and win a contest for good. This year we’re preparing for disasters. It is from what I can see the world’s largest hack ever, and it’s focused for the greater good. I think that really puts a good light on open source

LF: So it’s not coding for the sake of coding, it’s for some greater good?

Diaz: Exactly. Think about it. We are going to put the winning entries into production. If its an app, or whatever gets built, saves one life, it’s worth it. It’ll probably save tens, hundreds, maybe thousands of lives.

IBM has committed to the project for five years. It’s just been incredible to see tens of thousands of developers registering, participating and being part of this endeavor. It doesn’t matter if you’re a developer or a data scientist or even if you’re just a subject matter expert or someone who cares about preparing for disasters, sign up and register because teams are forming. Someone may need somebody who is a professional on hurricanes, you can help. The best teams that I know of are multidisciplinary. It’s not just for developers. Join!

This article was sponsored by IBM and written by The Linux Foundation.

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Source: Linux Foundation

Open Source Networking Days Returning This Fall

OSN Days

OSN Days are a series of one-day events to facilitate F2F collaboration. Tours this fall cover China, APAC, and North America starting October 12.

As we gear up the for the first ever Open Networking Summit Europe event, Amsterdam, September 25-27, it’s becoming clear to me just how far we’ve come this year since the formation of LF Networking. With new major operators joining, like Deutsche Telekom, and others requiring open source project automation tools in their RFPs, like Orange, it’s inspiring to witness just how much the networking industry is rallying around open source and incorporating it as a key element of their business strategies. It’s great to see LF Networking recognized for its role in bringing the ecosystem together, and to see open source community contribution increasingly recognized as driving increased business value.

At The Linux Foundation, we believe strongly in face-to-face collaboration. For those who can’t make it to Amsterdam this time, I wanted to share the good news that the next three Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days) tours will be coming this fall to China, APAC, and North America. Here are confirmed cities and dates so far. Click on the links to learn more and register. Check back soon to main OSN Days website for updates on the others.

China: Shanghai: Oct 12 | Nanjing: Oct 15 | Beijing: Oct 17

APAC: Singapore: Oct 15 | Taiwan: (Hsinchu): Oct 17 | Tokyo: Oct 23

North America: Ottawa: Oct 30 | Bay Area: Nov 1 | Dallas: Nov 6 | Toronto: Nov 8 | Boston: Nov 19 | Montreal: Nov 29 | Austin: TBD

Launched last year, OSN Days is a series of regional, one-day events hosted and organized by local open source networking ecosystem members — including industry, service providers, academia, and start-ups — with support from LF Networking and its projects: FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, SNAS, and Tungsten Fabric. Attendees will hear from a roster of expert speakers on the state of the industry; the projects that make up the open source networking stack, the integration points between them, the use cases and business opportunities enabled by network transformation, how to get involved, and much more. This is also a great chance to hear directly from — and engage directly with — operators such as AT&T, China Mobile, China Telecom, China Telecom, and Reliance Jio.

There is no cost to attend and I invite you to register today. If you have any questions, or would like to host an event in the future, please email osndays@linuxfoundation.org.

Whether at ONS Europe, OSN Days, or the other industry events and meetups on our calendar, we hope to get the chance to meet with you soon and build upon the great work we’ve started. It’s a good time to be in networking.

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Source: Linux Foundation

Linux Foundation’s OpenDaylight Fluorine Release Brings Streamlined Support for Cloud, Edge and WAN Solutions

Most pervasive open source SDN controller issues ninth platform release as more users and open source platforms leverage OpenDaylight Project to achieve promise of SDN/NFV

SAN FRANCISCO, September 13, 2018–The OpenDaylight Project, the leading open source platform for programmable, software-defined networks, today announced its ninth release, OpenDaylight Fluorine. The latest version brings major advancements for solution providers through key enhancements to the platform, including simplified packaging to speed solution development and enhanced capabilities for key use cases.

“Fluorine is one of the most streamlined releases to date for OpenDaylight, delivering a core set of mature components needed for most major use cases in a ‘managed release’ for easy consumption by commercial and in-house solution providers, as well as by downstream projects such as ONAP and OpenStack,” said Phil Robb, vice president, Operations, Networking, and Orchestration, The Linux Foundation. In addition, the release includes critical updates to clustering and service assurance to improve scalability, security and reliability to support our large end user deployments – including solutions from Cornell University, Globo.com, Orange,  Tencent, and others using all OpenDaylight to further their open networking initiatives.”

OpenDaylight is also seeing ongoing industry momentum as more users deploy the platform to realize the power of open SDN/NFV.  For example, Globo.com, a leading internet-related services and platforms company based in Brazil, is using OpenDaylight as their primary SDN controller platform. A new case study details the benefits the company is seeing from using OpenDaylight to deploy ACLs on virtual switches. FRINX has demonstrated customer success stories with its OpenDaylight Distribution together with SoftBank and China Telecom BRI while Red Hat’s new functional release in Red Hat OpenStack Platform (OSP) version 13 also features OpenDaylight.

OpenDaylight’s latest release includes new features important for cloud and edge environments, service function chaining, WAN connectivity, and optical transport. More details on what’s new in OpenDaylight Fluorine are outlined below.

Enhanced Functionality for Key SDN  Use Cases

 

  • WAN Connectivity. Fluorine includes an extremely mature and robust BGP stack, with improvements in BGPCEP and BGP/MPLS multicast support, making OpenDaylight a clear leader in SD-WAN innovation.
  • Optical Transport. Work on optical transport, including the TransportPCE project, has been nurtured within OpenDaylight for some time. Fluorine formally releases Transport PCE for the first time, as a component of the managed release. In addition, Fluorine  provides a new reference implementation for OpenROADM-based optical infrastructures control.
  • Cloud/edge Computing. Several new features were added to further enhance support for network virtualization within cloud and edge computing environments. This includes improved IPv6 support, support for both stateful and stateless security groups, and SR-IOV hardware offload for OVS. Much of this work has been developed for OpenStack environments, and is now being leveraged to integrate ODL with the Container Orchestration Engine for Kubernetes environments.  
  • Service Function Chaining (SFC). Updates to SFC accelerate delivery of services like network slicing, now supported by OpenvSwitch (OVS), allowing for improved adoption of SFC in the marketplace.

 

Increased Stability and Reliability

The OpenDaylight Fluorine release brings improvements in stability and scale, including complex bug fixes and enhancements to OpenDaylight infrastructure clustering capability. In addition, the new managed release process facilitates more thorough integration testing of the mature components, ensuring that release as a whole operates seamlessly.

Continued Cross-Community Integration

OpenDaylight continued its deep engagement with other open source projects and standards bodies such as OpenStack, OPNFV, Kubernetes, and ONAP. Notably, ODL code is integrated into OPNFV’s CI/CD toolchain, which slashes the time it takes the OPNFV community to provide feedback to ODL contributors from months to days.

Looking Ahead

The OpenDaylight project is hosting a Developer Forum in Amsterdam from September 23-24, in advance of the next platform release, Neon. The Neon release is expected in early 2019. Additional information and registration details can be found here.

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Additional Resources

 

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Source: Linux Foundation

Top 10 Reasons to Join the Premier European Open Source Event of the Year | Register Now to Save $150

open source event

Don’t miss Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, October 22 – 24 in Edinburgh.

See why you need to be at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe next month! Hurry — space is going quickly. Secure your spot and register by September 22 to save $150.

Here are the Top 10 Reasons you’ll want to be at this event:

  1. Timely Cutting-edge Content: 300+ sessions on Linux development, embedded Linux systems, IoT, cloud native development, cloud infrastructure, AI, blockchain and open source program management & community leadership.
  2. Deep Dive Labs & Tutorials: An Introduction to Linux Control Groups (cgroups),  Building Kubernetes Native Apps with the Operator Framework, Resilient and Fast Persistent Container Storage Leveraging Linux’s Storage Functionalities,  and 10 Years of Linux Containers, are just some of the labs and tutorials included in one low registration price.
  3. 12 Co-located Events*: Come for OSS & ELC + OpenIoT Summit and stay for LF Energy Summit, Linux Security Summit, Cloud & Container Embedded Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, IoT Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, Hyperledger Scotland Meetup, Linux in Safety-Critical Systems Summit, and many more co-located events.  (*Some co-located events may require an additional registration fee.)
  4. Discover New Projects & Technologies: Over 30 sponsors will be showcasing new projects and technologies in the Sponsor Showcase throughout the event, joined by our Technical Showcase at the Onsite Attendee reception showcasing Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects from system developers and hardware makers.
  5. Social Activities & Evening Events: Take a break and go on a sightseeing bus tour, join the 5K fun run or morning meditation, and meet with fellow attendees through the networking app. Collaborate with fellow attendees at the attendee reception at the National Museum of Scotland and at the Onsite Attendee Reception & Sponsor + Technical Showcase.
  6. Diversity Empowerment Summit: Explore ways to advance diversity and inclusion in the community and across the technology industry.
  7. Women in Open Source Lunch &  Better Together Diversity Social: Women and non-binary members of the open source community are invited to network with each other at the lunch sponsored by Adobe, while all underrepresented minorities are welcome to attend the at the Better Together Diversity Social.
  8. Developer & Hallway Track Lounge: The highlight for many at this event is the ability to collaborate with the open source community. This dedicated lounge offers a space for developers to hack and collaborate throughout the event as well as plenty of seating for hallway track discussions.
  9. Networking Opportunities: Attend the Speed Networking & Mentoring event, OS Career Mixer, or use the networking app to expand your open source community connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests.
  10. Hear from the Leading Technologists in Open Source: Keynote talks include a Linux Kernel update, a fireside chat with Linus Torvalds & Dirk Hohndel, a look at the future of AI and Deep Learning, a panel discussion on the future of energy with open source, a discussion on diversity & inclusion, a talk on the parallels between open source & video games, and insightful talks on how open source is changing banking, human rights and scientific collaboration

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit Europe: 

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Source: Linux Foundation

A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes

hyperledger

Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar showing how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric.

Deploying a multi-component system like Hyperledger Fabric to production is challenging. Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar, presented by Alejandro (Sasha) Vicente Grabovetsky and Nicola Paoli of AID:Tech.

Why should you care?

Hyperledger Fabric is rather awesome, but deploying a distributed network has been known to give headaches and even migraines. In this talk, we will not be providing you with a guillotine that forever gets rid of these headaches, but instead we will talk you through some tools that can help you deploy a functioning, production-ready Hyperledger Fabric network on a Kubernetes cluster.

Who should attend?

Ideally, you are a Dev, an Ops or a DevOps interested in learning more about how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric to Kubernetes.

You might know a little bit about Hyperledger Fabric and about Docker containers and Kubernetes. We assume limited knowledge and will do our best to as possible and explain and demystify all the components along the way.

What we will talk about?

In this webinar, we will lower the threshold so that you can deploy your very own Hyperledger Fabric network onto Kubernetes. So what is each of these?

Hyperledger Fabric is a permissioned (unlike the permissionless Ethereum network) framework, allowing you to create consortium Blockchain networks, where one or more organisations share an immutable ledger of records and smart contracts (called “chaincode” in Hyperledger Fabric).

Kubernetes is a platform for deploying microservices (i.e. containerised applications, typically using Docker) applications on a cluster, such that the applications:

  • use fewer resources than when using dedicated (bare metal or virtual) machines for each component,
  • are self-healing, such that failed containers are restarted
  • and are configured in a declarative rather than procedural way, making them robust

We do this by using a set of Helm Charts. Rather than using a monolithic Helm Chart for the whole deployment, we use separate charts for each Hyperledger Fabric component, namely the Certificate Authority, Peer, CouchDB and Orderer. We demonstrate how to get these charts working together to provide a unified blockchain system.

Along the way, we will explain the different concepts you need to understand your Hyperledger Fabric network:

  • What is a Certificate Authority?
  • Why is the network split across Orderers and Peers?
  • And what are CouchDB and Apache Kafka doing in all of this?

We’ll also guide you in the right direction to other resources you can look at to expand your understanding on how Hyperledger Fabric works, including:

  • the official EdX course and our upcoming chapter on Composer,
  • Sasha’s own course on Hyperledger Fabric and Composer, and
  • we will be using the Helm Charts (Kubernetes packages) we created to make our own lives easier.

When and where?

The webinar will be running on Wednesday, September the 26th, 9-10am PDT.

What are you waiting for? Register here!

About the presenters

Sasha and Nicola work at AID:Tech, developing blockchain solutions leveraging a microservice architecture and Hyperledger Fabric and Composer frameworks to provide digital identities to transparently trace charitable donations and remittances as digital assets are exchanged.

The post A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Source: Linux Foundation

WeBank and DataPipeline Join OpenMessaging to Build an Open Standard for Distributed Messaging

We are excited to announce two new members to the OpenMessaging Project: WeBank,  China’s first privately-owned bank and the first digital-only bank that focuses on microloan borrowers, and DataPipeline, a company that focuses on helping organizations increase data mobility by connecting data, application and device. WeBank and DataPipeline join Alibaba, Streamlio, Didi and Yahoo! in creating a vendor-neutral and open standard for distributed messaging that can be deployed in the cloud, on-premise, and with hybrid use cases.

The acceleration of microservice-based and cloud-based applications has put a growing focus on how data is connected to services, applications and users. This focus has led to a number of new innovations and new products that support messaging and queueing needs. It has also contributed to increased demands on messaging and queuing solutions, making performance and scalability critical to success.

The OpenMessaging community looks to eliminate these challenges through:

  • Creating a global, cloud-oriented, vendor-neutral industry standard for distributed messaging
  • Facilitating a standard benchmark for testing applications
  • Enabling platform independence
  • Targeting cloud data streaming and messaging requirements with scalability, flexibility, isolation, and security built-in
  • Fostering a growing community of contributing developers

Headquartered in Shenzhen, China, WeBank is China’s first privately-owned bank and first digital-only bank focusing on microloan borrowers and initiated by Linux Foundation Platinum member, Tencent. The company uses different banking architectures, from distributed architecture to open source technologies, and fully utilizes the benefits of messaging by implementing various messaging techniques in different scenarios, such as message exchanges, pub/sub and request/reply models.

“We’ve built a messaging bus calledWeMQ, which is also compatible with other messaging services. These are critical to our business. However, after adding different messaging services, we realized there is a need for a universal, scalable and reliable standard for distributed messaging, in order for us to scale,” said Eason Chen, WeBank Tech Specialist. “We believe OpenMessaging can address our current challenges, and we look forward to contributing to its efforts.”

As a next-generation integration PaaS technology provider, DataPipeline serves many Fortune 500 customers from financial, retail and manufacture sectors, solving the problem of integrating thousands of data sources and billions of messages in real time with zero effort.

The team at DataPipeline has experience in building large scale data mobility applications based on open source MQs. When the microservice framework started to gain traction, doing high concurrency service calls, bulk data streaming and joining became huge problems.

“As we started to adopt a variety of open source MQ solutions (Apache RocketMQ, Apache Kafka, etc.), we began to notice that these solutions were not cloud native and language agnostics, creating major problems for those that are looking to implement digital transformation,” said Cheng Chen, CEO of DataPipeline. “The industry needs a standard to unify the abstraction of messaging systems. We look forward to collaborating with the OpenMessaging project to create an open standard for distributed messaging systems that will not be impacted by the underlying MQ implementation.”

If you are interested in staying informed on news and updates of this project, join the discussion.  

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Source: Linux Foundation

Find Out How to Leverage AI, Blockchain, Kubernetes & Cloud Native Technologies at Open FinTech Forum, NYC, Oct. 10 & 11

Don’t miss Open FinTech Forum, October 10 and 11 in New York.

Join Open FinTech Forum: AI, Blockchain & Kubernetes on Wall Street next month to learn:

  • How to build internal open source programs
  • How to leverage cutting-edge open source technologies to drive efficiencies and flexibility

Blockchain Track:

Hear about the latest distributed ledger deployments, use cases, trends, and predictions of blockchain adoption. Session highlights include:

  • Panel Discussion: Distributed Ledger Technology Deployments & Use Cases in Financial Services – Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo; Umar Farooq, JP Morgan; Julio Faura, Santander Bank; Hanna Zubko, IntellectEU; Robert Hackett, Fortune Magazine
  • Enterprise Blockchain Adoption – Trends and Predictions – Saurabh Gupta, HfS Research
  • Blockchain Based Compliance Management System – Ashish Jadhav, Reliance Jio Infocomm Limited

Artificial Intelligence Track:

See how financial institutions are increasingly using AI and machine learning in a range of applications across the financial system including fraud detection, DDoS mitigation, marketing and usage pattern analysis. Session highlights include:  

  • Build Intelligent Applications with Azure Cognitive Service and CNTK – Bhakthi Liyanage, Bank of America
  • Will HAL Open the Pod Bay Doors? An (Enterprise FI) Decisioning Platform Leveraging Machine Learning – Sumit Daryani & Niraj Tank, Capital One
  • Using Text Mining and Machine Learning to Enhance the Credit Risk Assessment Process – Bruce Brenkus, Spotcap

Cloud Native & Kubernetes Track:

Learn how Kubernetes and other cloud native applications help provide integration and automation between development and deployment for platform or infrastructure as code. Session highlights include:

  • Panel Discussion: Real-World Kubernetes Use Cases in Financial Services: Lessons Learned from Capital One, BlackRock and Bloomberg – Steven Bower, Bloomberg; Michael Francis, BlackRock; Jeffrey Odom, Capital One; Paris Pittman, Google; Ron Miller, TechCrunch
  • Multi-tenancy and Tenant Isolation on Kubernetes – Michael Knapp & Andrew Gao, Capital One
  • Building a Banking Platform on Open Source & Containers to Achieve a Cloud Native Platform – Jason Poley, Barclays

Open FinTech Forum also offers deep dive sessions on building internal open source programs (governance, compliance, establishing an open source program office, contributing and more) as well as tutorials on blockchain, containers and cloud native.

Whether you are already using open source, or just getting started, Open FinTech Forum offers learnings, insights and connections that can help inform IT decision makers about the open technologies driving digital transformation and how to best utilize them.

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The post Find Out How to Leverage AI, Blockchain, Kubernetes & Cloud Native Technologies at Open FinTech Forum, NYC, Oct. 10 & 11 appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Source: Linux Foundation

APIStrat 2018 Focuses on the API Economy for API Beginners and Experts

Top minds in API development and strategy, social justice in tech, and conscious coding bring a robust set of ideas to the keynote stage

 SAN FRANCISCO, September 6, 2018The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and the OpenAPI Initiative, a Linux Foundation project created to advance API technology, today announced the full schedule for APIStrat 2018, taking place September 24-26 in Nashville, Tennessee.

The API Strategy & Practice Conference, known as APIStrat, is a conference focused on the future of the API economy. The ninth edition of the conference will bring together everyone – from the API curious to today’s leaders – to discuss opportunities and challenges in the API space. The event covers 13 different topic areas in the API economy, including microservices, API as products, API portals, API design, GraphQL and friends, API usability and, more.

Keynotes for the event include leading API voices from across the space as well as conversations that are important to the wider tech sector. Keynotes include:

  • Cristiano Betta, Senior Developer Advocate at Box, discussing A Live API
  • Virginia Eubanks, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany, SUNY discussing Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police and Punish the Poor
  • James Higginbotham, Executive API Consultant at LaunchAny discussing Lessons in Transforming the Enterprise to an API Platform
  • Kate O’Neill, author of Pixels and Place and lead at KO Insights, discussing Tech Humanism: Integration, Automation, and the Future of the Human Experience
  • Jenn Schiffer, Community Engineer at Glitch discussing Putting Your Best “Hello World” Forward
  • Steven Willmott, Senior Director and head of API Infrastructure at Red Hat discussing APIs meet Enterprise: Surfing the wave between Chaos and Innovation

Along with panels, sessions and keynotes, APIStrat hosts hands-on workshops, including:

  • Taming Your API from Sachin Agarwal, Principal Product Manager at LaunchDarkly
  • Usable APIs at Scale with Protocol Buffers and gRPCfrom Tim Burks, Staff Software Engineer at Google
  • A Tour of Mobile API Projection from Skip Hovsmith, VP of Growth at CriticalBlue
  • Practical SecDevOps for APIs from Isabelle Mauny, CTO at 42Crunch
  • Turning External Services to Internal APIs from Chris Phillips, SWAT Integration Architect at IBM
  • Secure API Development from Krishan Veer, Technical Leader and Security evangelist at Cisco DevNet

The full lineup of sessions can be viewed here. The event also offers a nursing room, complimentary childcare onsite (pre-registration is requested by September 7), a quiet room and non-binary restrooms.

Registration is discounted to $599 through September 14. Additional academic discounts are available as well; details are available on the event registration page. If you have an interest in becoming a diversity partner for this event, please email apistratevents@linuxfoundation.org.

Members of the media interested in attending can email Dan Brown at dbrown@linuxfoundation.orgto request a complimentary press pass.

APIStrat is made possible by Platinum Sponsors Red Hat and WS02; Bronze Sponsors 42Crunch, API Fortress, Authlete, Postman, SmartBear and Stoplight; and Break Sponsor, Capital One DevExchange.

Sponsorship opportunities are still available. More information here.

 Additional Resources

The post APIStrat 2018 Focuses on the API Economy for API Beginners and Experts appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Source: Linux Foundation

Real-Time Linux Continues Its Way to Mainline Development and Beyond

The Real-Time Linux project team continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline kernel.

Long ago in 2009, a small team of kernel developers had finished consolidating previous  prototypic developments to make Linux real-time capable into a single out-of-tree patch set, called the PREEMPT_RT patch set. This patch set can be applied to turn a vanilla mainline Linux kernel without real-time capabilities into a real-time capable Linux kernel. Many companies use this patch set to build various industrial systems that required to implement hard real-time properties at comparatively relaxed time bounds of about one millisecond precision.

BMW Car IT also used to this patch set to build real-time capable prototypes for complex functions in the area of autonomous driving. However, from the beginning with the development of those prototypes, it was clear that any product with high-quality demands requires to get the PREEMPT_RT patch set in the main-line development for increased compatibility of features, stronger quality assurance and reduced maintenance. Hence, BMW Car IT started driving efforts to make Linux real-time capable in 2014.

First, BMW Car IT joined OSADL, the Open Source Automation Development Lab, as a Gold member to support real-time Linux development activities, which was collaboratively funded by the OSADL member at that time.

Second, our former colleague Daniel Wagner started to get acquainted with the existing PREEMPT_RT patch in 2014 and made a number of contributions to the Linux kernel related to real-time capabilities from 2015 until end of 2016. Due to his experience with the PREEMPT_RT patch, he is now the maintainer of the Linux 4.4 real-time stable branch, and one of the three maintainers for the real-time stable patch branches.

Since 2016, the Real-time Linux project has been a collaborative project under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. The project’s goal is to make the mainline Linux real-time capable. The project ensures that the Linux kernel developers have the ability to continue development work, long-term support and future research for a real-time-capable Linux.

Rewriting and Refactoring

In the last two years, 2016 and 2017, the Real-time Linux development team rewrote the CPU hotplug infrastructure and refactored the timer wheel and high-resolution timers. This already reduced the out-of-tree PREEMPT_RT patch set significantly.

Due to a funding decrease that became apparent at the beginning of 2018, the development in the Real-time Linux project would have reduced its workforce. Fortunately, Intel and BMW Car IT could close this funding gap. Intel increased their membership from Gold to Platinum and BMW Car IT joined Linux Foundation and the collaborative project as Gold member in the Real-time Linux Project. So now after those project adjustments, the Real-time Linux Project team is back on track and continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline development with full speed.

In 2018, the Real-time Linux kernel team will be refactoring, rewriting and generally improving the printk and soft interrupt infrastructure and other smaller other parts. This work will prepare the Linux kernel source code so that all further real-time specific changes can smoothly be merged into the mainline kernel.

The real-time functionality touches the core kernel parts (i.e., it requires significant changes in timers, schedulers, locking mechanisms, interrupt handling and more), and it also is a cross-cutting concern for all drivers (i.e., every driver has to follow a certain discipline to make the overall kernel real-time capable). Hence, it is difficult to predict the exact date when the Real-time Linux Project will finally have all its patches merged into the main-line development. However, there is no doubt that the Linux kernel will eventually become real-time capable.

“The Linux kernel is a software development project of huge invest to us. Obviously, BMW Car IT has a high interest of making best possible use of this software asset. The automotive industry has particular requirements, such as higher real-time requirements and the need for longer maintenance periods, than the general IT and consumer electronics industry. With our investments in initiatives addressing these requirements, we can ensure that Linux fits to our needs,” says Kai-Uwe Balszuweit, CEO of BMW Car IT.

Reviewing and Testing

Once the real-time capabilities have been integrated in the main-line development, the project work is of course not just finished and the Real-time Linux project cannot just be abandoned. After the final integration into the main-line development, the development activities will slowly shift its focus:

The core system will not require further changes for the real-time capability, but the Real-Time Linux development team will need to review, test and adjust new incoming features from other kernel development teams to keep the kernel real-time capable when these new features are included.

Furthermore, the already existing real-time stable trees must be further continued to be maintained until the end of life of the corresponding kernel LTS version, so commonly two years for most LTS versions, but possibly even longer. Slowly over the years, the real-time stable trees for older kernel versions will reach their end of life, while for younger LTS kernel versions, which have the real-time capabilities fully included, have no need to maintain a separate real-time stable branch. This will decrease the working effort on the current real-time stable maintainers and they can focus their work to assist in the quality assurance of the continuous main-line development.

Of course, all users and stakeholders of the real-time capability must continue to support all these activities over the next years.

This is well understood at BMW Car IT, and we expect that other companies that require the real-time capability in Linux will also follow and express this general common understanding. Beyond software development until start of production, operations and maintenance is an important software development activity that is not underestimated at BMW Car IT.

Christian Salzmann, the CEO of BMW Car IT, states it clearly: “Providing good software solutions to BMW for many years, BMW Car IT knows that continuous operations and maintenance is one of the major cornerstones for providing a great experience to our customers. The continuous activity of development and operations of software going hand-in-hand, in short DevOps, is part of BMW Car IT’s company mindset. BMW Car IT’s support for further development and operations in the Real-time Linux Project is no exception to this rule.”

The post Real-Time Linux Continues Its Way to Mainline Development and Beyond appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Source: Linux Foundation

New Hyperledger Training Course and Certification Exams Expand Accessibility of Enterprise Blockchain Education

Continued growth in adoption of blockchain technology spurs creation of new opportunities to gain and demonstrate skills

SAN FRANCISCO, September 5, 2018The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced enrollment is now open for the new LFD271 – Hyperledger Fabric Fundamentals training course. Additionally, Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator and Certified Hyperledger Sawtooth Administrator exams will be released later in the year. A Professional Certificate Program – Blockchain for Business – was launched earlier this year on edX along with a free course entitled Blockchain: Understanding Its Uses and Implications.

“Blockchain technology adoption is increasing at a rapid pace – with TechCrunch reporting blockchain jobs as the second-fastest growing in today’s labor market – leading to a shortage of professionals who are qualified to implement and manage it on an enterprise scale,” said Linux Foundation General Manager, Training & Certification Clyde Seepersad. “After seeing more than 100,000 students take our free introductory Hyperledger course, we knew it was time for more advanced training options, and certification exams to demonstrate the extent of professionals’ knowledge.”

LFD271 – Hyperledger Fabric Fundamentals

The Hyperledger Fabric Fundamentals course introduces the fundamental concepts of blockchain and distributed ledger technologies, as well as the core architecture and components that make up typical decentralized Hyperledger Fabric applications. Students will work with Hyperledger Fabric, Hyperledger Fabric Certificate Authority and the Hyperledger Fabric SDK. In addition to the reading material, the two day, self-paced course includes a set of hands-on lab exercises that guide students towards setting up a Hyperledger Fabric business network and through the various stages in the lifecycle of a decentralized Hyperledger Fabric-based application.

LFD271 is designed for developers and application developers. Developers will learn how business logic is implemented in Hyperledger Fabric through chaincode (Hyperledger Fabric’s smart contracts) and review the various transaction types used to read from and write to the distributed ledger. Application developers will be shown how their applications can invoke transactions using the Hyperledger Fabric JavaScript SDK.

The course instructor, Jonathan Levi, is a hands-on computer scientist, applied cryptographer and mathematician, as well as the founder of HACERA, the blockchain technology company. He is one of the early contributors to Hyperledger Fabric, helped shape the Membership Services (the permissioning layer of Hyperledger Fabric) and was the official release manager of Hyperledger Fabric 1.0. He has built several large-scale mission critical systems that had to be highly available, secure and fault-tolerant. Over the last five years, Jonathan has worked with several blockchain technology stacks – from Bitcoin to building the first Ethereum class with Professor Dan Boneh at Stanford University.

The course is available to take now at a limited time, introductory cost of $199 (regularly $299).

Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator Exam

The Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator (CHFA) will be able to effectively build a secure Hyperledger Fabric network for commercial deployment. To pass the exam, professionals must demonstrate the ability to install, configure, operate, manage, and troubleshoot the nodes on that network. Although completion of LFD271 is not required to take the CHFA exam, it is recommended as it helps serves as preparation for the exam.

Exam topics will include:

  • Application Lifecycle Management
  • Installing and Configuring the Network
  • Diagnostics and Troubleshooting
  • Membership Service Provision
  • Network Maintenance and Operations

The full list of Domains and Competencies for CHFA can be found here.

Certified Hyperledger Sawtooth Administrator Exam

The Certified Hyperledger Sawtooth Administrator (CHSA) will be able to effectively build a secure Hyperledger Sawtooth network for commercial deployment. To pass the exam, professionals must demonstrate the ability to install, configure, operate, manage, and troubleshoot the nodes on that network.

Exam topics will include:

  • Installation
  • Configuration
  • Permissioning, Identity Management & Security
  • Lifecycle
  • Troubleshooting

The full list of Domains and Competencies for CHSA can be found here.

Both the CHFA and CHSA exams will be available to take before the end of the year. As with all Linux Foundation certification exams, the exams will be available remotely from virtually any location with a stable internet connection and webcam. Those who fail to pass the exam on their first attempt will be able to retake the exam one additional time at no cost.

You can read more about the CHFA and CHSA certification exams and the community members that contributed on the Hyperledger blog.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Source: Linux Foundation