4 Best Linux PDF Editors You Can Use in 2017

By Ambarish Kumar

Best software to edit PDF in Linux

Brief: It is not an easy task to find a good PDF editor for Linux but we created a list of PDF editing tools in Linux for you.

Linux systems do not come with a default PDF editor. If you are in need of an application which can do some basic editing, there are many options available. However, when it comes to a software which provides the advanced facilities found in Adobe Acrobat for your Linux system, the choices are limited.

If you ask how to edit PDF files in Linux, LibreOffice Draw could be an answer. However, it is limited when it comes to editing PDF in Linux. And this is why we have included proprietary software like PDF Studio and Master PDF are fully featured commercial PDF editors available for Linux users.

Best PDF editors for Linux

Just a quick note. I have used Ubuntu Linux while writing this article. But it is not just a list of Ubuntu pdf editors. This list is applicable to other Linux distributions equally.

1. LibreOffice Draw [FOSS]

editable PDF files in Ubuntu Linux

LibreOffice draw provides a handy way of editing a PDF file. If your requirements are very limited and mostly text editing in a PDF document, Draw will serve your purpose. It is not a full-fledged PDF editor and comes with some limitations, such as not being able to edit a scanned PDF document.

We have a detailed article on how to edit PDF files using LibreOffice Draw.

LibreOffice is free and comes bundled with most of the distributions.

2. Okular [FOSS]

Okular is a popular free and open source document viewer developed by KDE which includes basic PDF editing features.

Okular PDF Editor for Linux

Once you open a PDF file in Okular, you can copy a part of the text to the clipboard by selecting it, or save it as an image. You can choose Tools > Reviews to get other options like adding pop-ups notes, inline notes, freehand line drawing, highlighter, stamp and other features.

Okular can pretty much handle your basic PDF editing tasks, however, for advanced editing, it may not be that much useful.

Installation

Okular is available in the software repository of almost all major Linux distributions. You can install it from your software center. Source code should be available as well.

3. Qoppa PDF Studio [Not FOSS]

PDF Studio is a commercial PDF editor from Qoppa Software that has all the necessary editing features. You can create, review and edit a PDF file.

PDF Studio

Features

  • Edit text contents and properties, shapes and path objects, move and resize images and optimize PDFs to reduce file size.
  • Add sticky notes, text boxes, freehand annotations, hyperlinks etc.
  • Attach a file to a PDF document
  • Features an interactive form designer, fill in and save interactive PDF forms and flatten any form fields.
  • Scan papers directly to PDF and extract, insert or delete pages.
  • Apply headers, footers, watermarks and custom actions.
  • Add password to a PDF document and digitally sign a PDF document.
  • Supports advanced features, such as text search, comparing two PDFs side by side, rulers and grid views.
  • Supports a touch mode for touch screens laptops.

Installation

Get a .deb package from the official page. and install it using dpkg.

Or download the installer script from the official download page. Navigate to the download folder and type in the below command start the installation.

sh ./PDFStudio_v12_0_3_linux64

The content editing is available only in PDF Studio Pro Edition and costs a one-time $129. You can get a free trial before buying the full version.

4. Master PDF Editor [Not FOSS]

Master PDF Editor is another proprietary application for editing PDF files. With Master PDF Editor, you can do almost everything ranging from editing a PDF file to editing scanned documents and signature handling.

Master PDF Editor

Features

  • Add or edit text in a PDF file, insert images, change the size of objects and copy objects from a PDF file to the clipboard.
  • Provides powerful annotation tools, such as sticky notes, measuring tools and shapes as well as enhance capabilities such as strikethrough, underline and highlights.
  • Support creation, editing and filling of PDF forms.
  • Edit scanned documents and documents containing images.
  • Merge or split a PDF file; create, edit or remove bookmarks.
  • Supports digital signature and much more.

Installation

Both commercial and free version of Master PDF editor are available for Linux. The free version comes with some limitation; digital signatures, encryption and watermarks are not available. If you just need to create or edit a PDF file, you can still opt for the free version and get your work done. The commercial version costs $50.

Both .deb and .rpm package are available to download and you can get them from here.

Final Words

There are many other PDF editors available for basic editing as well as for advanced users. People like me always get the work done from LibreOffice while some need tools like Master PDF Editor and PDF Studio.

While we have not been able to add many, please feel free to suggest any open source pdf editor that you know and we will be happy to include it here.

From: It’s FOSS

GNOME and KDE Join Librem 5 Linux Smartphone Party

By Derick Sullivan M. Lobga

KDE and GNOME support Purism for Librem 5 Linux smartphone

Brief: Purism is making a true Linux smartphone called Librem 5. KDE and GNOME have just lent their support for Librem 5.

You probably already know that Purism has launched a crowdfunding campaign in a bid to create a Linux smartphone. The goal is to raise $1.5 million to bring the world’s first truly free and open source smartphone with enhanced user protection and end-to-end encryption into the market.

Librem 5 wants you to be able to run any major Linux distributions such as Debian, Arch, Ubuntu etc on your smartphone. And to support this ‘dream’, two big Linux desktop projects, GNOME and KDE are joining hands with Purism so that Librem 5 would be able to run KDE and GNOME desktop environments on it.

These announcements came at an interval of a few days and we have covered both news in this one article.

Librem 5 and KDE

The partnership with KDE is for KDE to adapt Plasma Mobile for Librem 5 smartphone. Plasma Mobile is a full-featured graphical environment developed by KDE for mobile devices. It has been tested on some devices but since it is free and open, it clashes with most smartphones as their hardware needs proprietary software to work.

Purism and KDE have a shared vision of “freedom, openness and personal control for end users”. This common goal has brought them together, as announced by KDE.

Building a Free Software and privacy-focused smartphone has been a dream of the KDE community for a long time….Partnering with Purism will allow us to ready Plasma Mobile for the real world and integrate it seamlessly with a commercial device for the first time,” Lydia Pintscher, president of KDE said.

Librem 5 and GNOME

GNOME Foundation has announced that it will create emulators, tools as well as build awareness in moving GNOME/GTK onto the Purism Librem 5 smartphone. If everything goes on well, the GNOME Foundation will enhance GNOME shell and its system performance with Purism that will enable features on the Librem 5.

It should be noted that GNOME technologies have been used in embedded devices like Nokia 770, N800 and N900 even though the developers had some challenging experience with the devices.

According to Neil McGovern, the executive director or GNOME Foundation, “Having a Free/Libre and Open Source software stack on a mobile device is a dream-come-true for so many people, and Purism has the proven team to make this happen”.

What it means for Librem 5

For Purism, getting an endorsement from such communities means the world is getting closer to a phone that “avoids the handcuffs of Android and iOS”. “Purism is excited to work with many communities and organizations to advance the digital rights of people,” Founder & CEO of Purism, Todd Weaver said.

At the time of writing this, the crowdfunding campaign had raised 47.70% ($625,464) of the required $1,500,000 with 31 days to go.

The initial plan was to ship the smartphone with a GNOME desktop environment and GTK toolkit-based custom user interface. Now they are partnering with both the GNOME and KDE teams in order to “test, support, and develop with KDE and the KDE community” as well as using the Qt toolkit and GTK to develop apps.

Purism had already used GNOME for its PureOS software which is used in its tablets and laptop computers. They say they will continue to test both GNOME or KDE-based software and will decide after the project is funded which of them to use to ship the phone with.

If you want to make Librem 5 a reality, please contribute to the project:

Support Librem 5

From: It’s FOSS

GNOME and KDE Join Librem 5 Linux Smartphone Party

By Derick Sullivan M. Lobga

KDE and GNOME support Purism for Librem 5 Linux smartphone

Brief: Purism is making a true Linux smartphone called Librem 5. KDE and GNOME have just lent their support for Librem 5.

You probably already know that Purism has launched a crowdfunding campaign in a bid to create a Linux smartphone. The goal is to raise $1.5 million to bring the world’s first truly free and open source smartphone with enhanced user protection and end-to-end encryption into the market.

Librem 5 wants you to be able to run any major Linux distributions such as Debian, Arch, Ubuntu etc on your smartphone. And to support this ‘dream’, two big Linux desktop projects, GNOME and KDE are joining hands with Purism so that Librem 5 would be able to run KDE and GNOME desktop environments on it.

These announcements came at an interval of a few days and we have covered both news in this one article.

Librem 5 and KDE

The partnership with KDE is for KDE to adapt Plasma Mobile for Librem 5 smartphone. Plasma Mobile is a full-featured graphical environment developed by KDE for mobile devices. It has been tested on some devices but since it is free and open, it clashes with most smartphones as their hardware needs proprietary software to work.

Purism and KDE have a shared vision of “freedom, openness and personal control for end users”. This common goal has brought them together, as announced by KDE.

Building a Free Software and privacy-focused smartphone has been a dream of the KDE community for a long time….Partnering with Purism will allow us to ready Plasma Mobile for the real world and integrate it seamlessly with a commercial device for the first time,” Lydia Pintscher, president of KDE said.

Librem 5 and GNOME

GNOME Foundation has announced that it will create emulators, tools as well as build awareness in moving GNOME/GTK onto the Purism Librem 5 smartphone. If everything goes on well, the GNOME Foundation will enhance GNOME shell and its system performance with Purism that will enable features on the Librem 5.

It should be noted that GNOME technologies have been used in embedded devices like Nokia 770, N800 and N900 even though the developers had some challenging experience with the devices.

According to Neil McGovern, the executive director or GNOME Foundation, “Having a Free/Libre and Open Source software stack on a mobile device is a dream-come-true for so many people, and Purism has the proven team to make this happen”.

What it means for Librem 5

For Purism, getting an endorsement from such communities means the world is getting closer to a phone that “avoids the handcuffs of Android and iOS”. “Purism is excited to work with many communities and organizations to advance the digital rights of people,” Founder & CEO of Purism, Todd Weaver said.

At the time of writing this, the crowdfunding campaign had raised 47.70% ($625,464) of the required $1,500,000 with 31 days to go.

The initial plan was to ship the smartphone with a GNOME desktop environment and GTK toolkit-based custom user interface. Now they are partnering with both the GNOME and KDE teams in order to “test, support, and develop with KDE and the KDE community” as well as using the Qt toolkit and GTK to develop apps.

Purism had already used GNOME for its PureOS software which is used in its tablets and laptop computers. They say they will continue to test both GNOME or KDE-based software and will decide after the project is funded which of them to use to ship the phone with.

If you want to make Librem 5 a reality, please contribute to the project:

Support Librem 5

From: It’s FOSS

WallpaperDownloader: Automate Your Wallpaper Management in Linux

By Aquil Roshan

WallpaperDownloader Menu

One of the main reasons why I use Linux on my computers is customizability. And I’m sure I’m not the only one. Having an imagination for your desktop and realizing it, well, I’m pretty sure no other OS will beat Linux here. On other operating systems too, there are tools which are capable of altering the desktop to some extent, but they are nothing compared to Linux tools.

To begin with, there is a wide variety of desktop environments you can use on your Linux desktop. And if you are not completely satisfied with any of them, you can go ahead and use extensions for fine-tuning. And how can we forget about wallpapers when we are talking desktop customization?

WallpaperDownloader

WallpaperDownloader is a nifty application by Eloy García Almadén which has got you covered as far as wallpapers are concerned. WallpaperDownloader is a Java-based application which not only downloads wallpapers but is also a full-fledged wallpaper manager.

It is simple to use. It has got every functionality of a wallpaper manager. Right from downloading, storing, changing to space management. It works on Mate, GNOME Shell, Unity, XFCE and KDE Plasma (5.0 and above).

Basically, all you have to do is fill in your screen resolution, select the wallpaper providers and enter the keywords for wallpapers and rest is taken care of by WallpaperDownloader. Images are downloaded and changed automatically at your specified time interval.

You can also customize the time interval for the wallpapers to change.

WallpaperDownloader Menu

I input “Game of Thrones” as keywords and it was definitely impressive. BTW did you check out the Game of Thrones parody by SUSE Linux? A major Linux distro got dissed. So check it out. It’s war.

WallpaperDownloader in action

Nuff said. The installation instructions of WallpaperDownloader for different distros are given below.

Arch Linux/ Manjaro/ Antergos:

Run the below command in the terminal

yaourt wallpaperdownloader

Ubuntu/ Linux Mint/ Elementary OS and other derivatives:

Run the below commands in the terminal

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:eloy-garcia-pca/wallpaperdownloader
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt install wallpaperdownloader

Launch WallpaperDownloader from the Dash or the menu. And put in the parameters. Just be sure not to close the application but click on the ‘minimize’ button. That’s it. Give it a minute or two to see the changes.

Wrapping up

WallpaperDownloader is the best wallpaper tool for Linux. And it is a must-have in your arsenal if you’re serious about desktop appearance customization. Do give it a try. Use the comments below and let us know what applications and extensions you use to make your desktop more aesthetic. We’d love to hear. Don’t forget to share this article. Cheers.

From: It’s FOSS

WallpaperDownloader: Automate Your Wallpaper Management in Linux

By Aquil Roshan

WallpaperDownloader Menu

One of the main reasons why I use Linux on my computers is customizability. And I’m sure I’m not the only one. Having an imagination for your desktop and realizing it, well, I’m pretty sure no other OS will beat Linux here. On other operating systems too, there are tools which are capable of altering the desktop to some extent, but they are nothing compared to Linux tools.

To begin with, there is a wide variety of desktop environments you can use on your Linux desktop. And if you are not completely satisfied with any of them, you can go ahead and use extensions for fine-tuning. And how can we forget about wallpapers when we are talking desktop customization?

WallpaperDownloader

WallpaperDownloader is a nifty application by Eloy García Almadén which has got you covered as far as wallpapers are concerned. WallpaperDownloader is a Java-based application which not only downloads wallpapers but is also a full-fledged wallpaper manager.

It is simple to use. It has got every functionality of a wallpaper manager. Right from downloading, storing, changing to space management. It works on Mate, GNOME Shell, Unity, XFCE and KDE Plasma (5.0 and above).

Basically, all you have to do is fill in your screen resolution, select the wallpaper providers and enter the keywords for wallpapers and rest is taken care of by WallpaperDownloader. Images are downloaded and changed automatically at your specified time interval.

You can also customize the time interval for the wallpapers to change.

WallpaperDownloader Menu

I input “Game of Thrones” as keywords and it was definitely impressive. BTW did you check out the Game of Thrones parody by SUSE Linux? A major Linux distro got dissed. So check it out. It’s war.

WallpaperDownloader in action

Nuff said. The installation instructions of WallpaperDownloader for different distros are given below.

Arch Linux/ Manjaro/ Antergos:

Run the below command in the terminal

yaourt wallpaperdownloader

Ubuntu/ Linux Mint/ Elementary OS and other derivatives:

Run the below commands in the terminal

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:eloy-garcia-pca/wallpaperdownloader
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt install wallpaperdownloader

Launch WallpaperDownloader from the Dash or the menu. And put in the parameters. Just be sure not to close the application but click on the ‘minimize’ button. That’s it. Give it a minute or two to see the changes.

Wrapping up

WallpaperDownloader is the best wallpaper tool for Linux. And it is a must-have in your arsenal if you’re serious about desktop appearance customization. Do give it a try. Use the comments below and let us know what applications and extensions you use to make your desktop more aesthetic. We’d love to hear. Don’t forget to share this article. Cheers.

From: It’s FOSS

Manjaro Linux Discontinues 32-bit Support

By John Paul

Free HD Linux Wallpapers to download

Brief: Manjaro has joined the long list of Linux distributions dropping support for older hardware.

You might already know that I love Manjaro Linux. And as an ardent Manjaro Linux fan, I have a bad news for you.

Recently, Philip, the lead developer of Manjaro Linux, announced that the project would be dropping support for the 32-bit architecture. He said that the reason for the move was “due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community”.

While Manjaro 17.0.3 is the last release to have a 32-bit ISO, current 32-bit installs will receive a short window of continued support. During September and October, 32-bit package will continue to be updated. However, starting in November, packages will be limited to 64-bit. After that period, 32-bit installs of Manjaro will essentially be unsupported.

Note: if you are currently using an application that depends on a 32-bit package, it will continue to be supported through the mulilib repo.

Alternatives

If you currently have an older device that can’t run 64-bit, don’t worry, you have several alternatives to choose. Debian 9 dropped support for 32-bit, but if you install Debian 8 you’ll get 32-bit support until 2020. Canonical has been hinting that Ubuntu 18.10 will be the last release to support 32-bit, but if you install the 16.04 LTS release, you’ll have support until 2021.

Another possible alternative is Void Linux. This rolling release distribution is built completely from scratch with its own package manager.

If you want to stay in the Arch family, check out. ArchLinux32. There isn’t much information available on this distro, but it appears to be a community effort to keep Arch available for older systems.

If you are looking for a small distro that can run on anything, I suggest trying out the Puppy Linux family of distros. There is also Damn Small Linux. In fact, the lightweight Linux distributions should support 32-bit systems for several years.

Final Thoughts

This announcement isn’t really that big of a shock. After all, Arch Linux, the distro that Manjaro is based on, dropped support for 32-bit in February. Other distros like Debian, Ubuntu, Tails, Bodhi, Fedora, and others have either talked about doing the same or have already done it.

Change is inevitable. At one time, all computers were 8-bit and were replaced by 16-bit. And the cycle continues to this day and far past it. Thankfully, I only have a couple computers that I manage that need 32-bit support. Not much of a worry here.

What do you think? Are we looking at the end of 32-bit Linux?

From: It’s FOSS

Manjaro Linux Discontinues 32-bit Support

By John Paul

Free HD Linux Wallpapers to download

Brief: Manjaro has joined the long list of Linux distributions dropping support for older hardware.

You might already know that I love Manjaro Linux. And as an ardent Manjaro Linux fan, I have a bad news for you.

Recently, Philip, the lead developer of Manjaro Linux, announced that the project would be dropping support for the 32-bit architecture. He said that the reason for the move was “due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community”.

While Manjaro 17.0.3 is the last release to have a 32-bit ISO, current 32-bit installs will receive a short window of continued support. During September and October, 32-bit package will continue to be updated. However, starting in November, packages will be limited to 64-bit. After that period, 32-bit installs of Manjaro will essentially be unsupported.

Note: if you are currently using an application that depends on a 32-bit package, it will continue to be supported through the mulilib repo.

Alternatives

If you currently have an older device that can’t run 64-bit, don’t worry, you have several alternatives to choose. Debian 9 dropped support for 32-bit, but if you install Debian 8 you’ll get 32-bit support until 2020. Canonical has been hinting that Ubuntu 18.10 will be the last release to support 32-bit, but if you install the 16.04 LTS release, you’ll have support until 2021.

Another possible alternative is Void Linux. This rolling release distribution is built completely from scratch with its own package manager.

If you want to stay in the Arch family, check out. ArchLinux32. There isn’t much information available on this distro, but it appears to be a community effort to keep Arch available for older systems.

If you are looking for a small distro that can run on anything, I suggest trying out the Puppy Linux family of distros. There is also Damn Small Linux. In fact, the lightweight Linux distributions should support 32-bit systems for several years.

Final Thoughts

This announcement isn’t really that big of a shock. After all, Arch Linux, the distro that Manjaro is based on, dropped support for 32-bit in February. Other distros like Debian, Ubuntu, Tails, Bodhi, Fedora, and others have either talked about doing the same or have already done it.

Change is inevitable. At one time, all computers were 8-bit and were replaced by 16-bit. And the cycle continues to this day and far past it. Thankfully, I only have a couple computers that I manage that need 32-bit support. Not much of a worry here.

What do you think? Are we looking at the end of 32-bit Linux?

From: It’s FOSS

Get Certified in Linux, AWS and More with Linux Academy [57% Off for Limited Time]

By Abhishek Prakash

Linux Academy deal

You might have already heard of Linux Academy. In the last couple of years, it has become a prominent name in Linux training at an affordable cost.

They offer high-quality, self-paced cloud training courses on Amazon Web Services, OpenStack, Linux, Azure, Containers, DevOps, and more! They are official training partners of Linux Professional Institute (LPI), Chef, CompTIA Linux+ and AWS.

These training courses are scenario-based and include hands-on labs to practice common tasks in live servers. This way you gain the skills required to pass certification exams and excel at your job.

Linux Academy has a monthly subscription plan that costs $29 per month but in a limited time deal on It’s FOSS Shop, you can get 12 months subscription for $149 instead of $348, saving you 57% on the purchase.

You’ll:

  • Get unlimited access to over 1,200 hours of in-depth video content, labs, study groups, flashcards
  • Gain real-world skills through hands-on lab training
  • Utilize full-time instructors for advice & to answer your questions
  • Follow curated learning plans to keep yourself on track
  • Earn certificates as proof of your hard-earned skill and knowledge
  • Join the community to learn from other students
  • Learn from an Official Linux Professional Institute Training partner, Official Chef Training partner, Official Quality Content Approved CompTIA Linux+ provider, & an Official AWS Technology Partner

I don’t always cover such deals but since this could help you build a career in Linux, I have dedicated an entire article for this.

If you think that $149 is a bit out of your pocket, I suggest that you pool a group of friends and take the yearly subscription. This way you and your friend(s) can follow various courses of your choice.

Get Linux Academy: 1 Year Subscription [57% Off]

From: It’s FOSS

Get Certified in Linux, AWS and More with Linux Academy [57% Off for Limited Time]

By Abhishek Prakash

Linux Academy deal

You might have already heard of Linux Academy. In the last couple of years, it has become a prominent name in Linux training at an affordable cost.

They offer high-quality, self-paced cloud training courses on Amazon Web Services, OpenStack, Linux, Azure, Containers, DevOps, and more! They are official training partners of Linux Professional Institute (LPI), Chef, CompTIA Linux+ and AWS.

These training courses are scenario-based and include hands-on labs to practice common tasks in live servers. This way you gain the skills required to pass certification exams and excel at your job.

Linux Academy has a monthly subscription plan that costs $29 per month but in a limited time deal on It’s FOSS Shop, you can get 12 months subscription for $149 instead of $348, saving you 57% on the purchase.

You’ll:

  • Get unlimited access to over 1,200 hours of in-depth video content, labs, study groups, flashcards
  • Gain real-world skills through hands-on lab training
  • Utilize full-time instructors for advice & to answer your questions
  • Follow curated learning plans to keep yourself on track
  • Earn certificates as proof of your hard-earned skill and knowledge
  • Join the community to learn from other students
  • Learn from an Official Linux Professional Institute Training partner, Official Chef Training partner, Official Quality Content Approved CompTIA Linux+ provider, & an Official AWS Technology Partner

I don’t always cover such deals but since this could help you build a career in Linux, I have dedicated an entire article for this.

If you think that $149 is a bit out of your pocket, I suggest that you pool a group of friends and take the yearly subscription. This way you and your friend(s) can follow various courses of your choice.

Get Linux Academy: 1 Year Subscription [57% Off]

From: It’s FOSS

How to Create a Bootable Windows 10 USB in Linux

By Abhishek Prakash

How to create bootable Windows 10 USB in Linux

Brief: This tutorial shows you how to create a bootable Windows 10 USB in Linux with a GUI tool called WoeUSB.

I have talked a lot about creating bootable USB of Linux in Windows. How about the other way round? How about creating a bootable Windows 10 USB in Linux?

If you are uninstalling Linux from dual boot or if you want to reinstall Windows completely or you simply want to have a Windows installation disk ready, you’ll need a bootable Windows 10 USB or DVD.

In this tutorial, I am going to show you how to create a Windows 10 bootable USB in Linux. I am using Ubuntu for this tutorial but the steps should be valid for other Linux distributions as well.

How to Create a Bootable Windows 10 USB in Linux

Here’s what you need:

  • Windows 10 ISO
  • WoeUSB application
  • A USB key (pen drive) with at least 6 Gb of space

If you have an active internet connection, you can follow the instructions below. If not, you’ll have to get Windows 10 ISO and WoeUSB installer from some other means.

You can also watch a video of creating Windows 10 bootable USB. Do subscribe to our YouTube channel for more Linux videos:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8KNg6e3aKc?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent&w=640&h=390]

Let’s see how to create a bootable Windows 10 USB in Ubuntu and other Linux distribution.

Step 1: Download Windows 10 ISO

Go to Microsoft website and download Windows 10 ISO:

Download Windows 10 ISO

Step 2: Install WoeUSB application

WoeUSB is a free and open source application for creating Windows 10 bootable USB. It is actually a fork of WinUSB tool that has been discontinued now.

Ubuntu and other Ubuntu-based Linux distributions such as Linux Mint, elementary OS etc have a PPA available. You can use the command below to install WoeUSB:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

For other Linux distributions, you can check out the source code from the GitHub repository:

WoeUSB

Step 3: Format USB drive

Now, plug in your USB key. You’ll have to format it first. I presume you know how to format a USB key in your Linux distribution.

Ubuntu users can simply right click on the USB and click format.

Format before creating Windows 10 USB in Linux

The important part here is that you should format it in NTFS:

Format in NTF mode to create bootable WIndows 10 USB in Linux

Note: If you use Fat 32 file system for formatting, you may see encounter the error below later on:

Creating Windows 10 bootable USB in Ubuntu Linux

Step 4: Using WoeUSB to create bootable Windows 10

We have everything ready for us now. Start WoeUSB program.

Browse to the downloaded Windows 10 ISO file and select the USB drive on which you want to install it. Just click on Install to begin the process.

Create bootable Windows 10 USB in Ubuntu Linux

Note that it may take up to 15 minutes in creating the Windows 10 USB. Don’t get fooled by the ‘done’ on the screen.

Create bootable Windows 10 USB in Ubuntu Linux

That’s it. You should see a success message.

Create bootable Windows 10 USB in Ubuntu Linux

Step 5: Using Windows 10 bootable USB

Once the bootable USB is ready, restart your system. At boot time, press F2 or F10 or F12 repeatedly to go to the boot settings. In here, select to boot from USB.

Booting Windows 10 USB

You’ll see that Windows 10 is being booted and it gives you the option to install or repair your system. You know what to do now from here.

Booting Windows 10 USB

I hope you find this tutorial useful for creating bootable USB of Windows 10 in Linux. If you have questions or suggestions, please feel free leave a comment.

From: It’s FOSS