Linux Foundation Introduces Open Source License Agreement for Data Sharing

By Abhishek Prakash

Community Data License Agreement

Brief: In open source philosophy, you share source code. Why not share data along the same line? That’s what Linux Foundation’s Community Data License Agreement tries to address.

I am here at the first day of Open Source Summit 2017 Europe edition, in Prague. Things have just started. Mostly I hear the buzz around containers but among all these, one of the major new announcement that came today is the Community Data License Agreement.

In his keynote this morning, Jim Zemlin, head of the Linux Foundation, introduced this new open source license for sharing data for mass collaboration. The idea is similar to the open source philosophy of sharing source code.

Jim states that these “CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing “open” data”.

You probably have heard about Big Data. It plays an important role in machine learning, artificial intelligence etc. Now imagine that the vast amount of data available for the community to analyze and use them to create new machine learning and AI projects.

For example, self-driving cars rely heavily on AI systems and they need massive volumes of data to function properly. They could actually generate nearly a gigabyte of data every second on the road. For the average car, that means two petabytes of sensor, audio, video and other data each year. If automakers can share data, they may be able to improve safety and overall experience, thanks to community projects utilizing those data in their AI projects.

The CDLA licenses will help individuals and organizations to share data as easily as they share open source software code at present. Carefully drafted licensing models can help “people form communities to assemble, curate and maintain vast amounts of data, measured in petabytes and exabytes, to bring new value to communities of all types, to build new business opportunities and to power new applications that promise to enhance safety and services”.

Community Data License Agreement

From: It’s FOSS

Linux Foundation Introduces Open Source License Agreement for Data Sharing

By Abhishek Prakash

Community Data License Agreement

Brief: In open source philosophy, you share source code. Why not share data along the same line? That’s what Linux Foundation’s Community Data License Agreement tries to address.

I am here at the first day of Open Source Summit 2017 Europe edition, in Prague. Things have just started. Mostly I hear the buzz around containers but among all these, one of the major new announcement that came today is the Community Data License Agreement.

In his keynote this morning, Jim Zemlin, head of the Linux Foundation, introduced this new open source license for sharing data for mass collaboration. The idea is similar to the open source philosophy of sharing source code.

Jim states that these “CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing “open” data”.

You probably have heard about Big Data. It plays an important role in machine learning, artificial intelligence etc. Now imagine that the vast amount of data available for the community to analyze and use them to create new machine learning and AI projects.

For example, self-driving cars rely heavily on AI systems and they need massive volumes of data to function properly. They could actually generate nearly a gigabyte of data every second on the road. For the average car, that means two petabytes of sensor, audio, video and other data each year. If automakers can share data, they may be able to improve safety and overall experience, thanks to community projects utilizing those data in their AI projects.

The CDLA licenses will help individuals and organizations to share data as easily as they share open source software code at present. Carefully drafted licensing models can help “people form communities to assemble, curate and maintain vast amounts of data, measured in petabytes and exabytes, to bring new value to communities of all types, to build new business opportunities and to power new applications that promise to enhance safety and services”.

Community Data License Agreement

From: It’s FOSS

Let’s Bring FDM to Linux

By It’s FOSS Team

Free Download Manager for Linux

Brief: Free Download Manager is a popular open source application but unfortunately it is not available for Linux yet. But your vote can help bring it to Linux.

Isn’t it a shame that the list of best download managers for Linux doesn’t include Free Download Manager?

Free Download Manager (popularly known as FDM) is a download accelerator and a bit torrent client. The first version was released in 2004 as a proprietary software but it has been released as an open source software under the GPL license since 2010.

Despite being open source, FDM is only available for Windows and macOS, and not for Linux.

If you are wondering what makes FDM so special, let me tell that FDM has over 30 different awards for being a clean freeware, and it’s available in many languages (27 to be exact), and many consider it to be a drop-dead alternative for IDM (Internet Download Manager)—a commercial download manager —if not better.

Some of the other features of FDM are:

  • Supports download from HTTP and FTP sites.
  • Splits a large file into parts and downloads simultaneously.
  • Can choose three modes of traffic: Light, medium and heavy.
  • Schedule downloads and perform a set of actions once done.
  • Resume broken links if the server allows it.
  • Download videos from Youtube.
  • Import a list of URLs from the clipboard
  • Integrates well with most browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.
  • Bittorrent support based on libtorrent.
  • Drop box for file drag and drop.

Vote for FDM Linux version

The FDM developers posted a ‘features you want to see’ vote on Google forms asking the users to vote for features they would like to see next. One of those features is the long-awaited support for Linux. And despite it being a popular demand through the years, the feature is not even among the top 3.

It’s a golden opportunity to port FDM to the Linux ecosystem, many people converting to Linux from Windows miss it, and it doesn’t function 100% on Wine as many users reported.

So let’s put our effort and bring a popular software made available for Linux. Please vote for it on the Google Form link below. The option for Linux version is mentioned at number three at present.

Vote for FDM version for Linux

What’s the need of another download manager?

It’s a fundamental issue that goes far beyond FDM. Linux doesn’t have that many commercial software support and so people won’t use it, and when there is a chance for a popular software to be ported to Linux, the community should show support by voting for it. It’s all about making the Linux ecosystem user-friendly and to provide options for users who wish to adopt Linux as a main operating system.

Author detail: This article has been written by Muaad Elsharif, a teaching assistant, blogger and radio host from Tripoli, Libya. He is interested in Linux and open source solutions in general and likes to promote and help open source in his capacity.

From: It’s FOSS

Let’s Bring FDM to Linux

By It’s FOSS Team

Free Download Manager for Linux

Brief: Free Download Manager is a popular open source application but unfortunately it is not available for Linux yet. But your vote can help bring it to Linux.

Isn’t it a shame that the list of best download managers for Linux doesn’t include Free Download Manager?

Free Download Manager (popularly known as FDM) is a download accelerator and a bit torrent client. The first version was released in 2004 as a proprietary software but it has been released as an open source software under the GPL license since 2010.

Despite being open source, FDM is only available for Windows and macOS, and not for Linux.

If you are wondering what makes FDM so special, let me tell that FDM has over 30 different awards for being a clean freeware, and it’s available in many languages (27 to be exact), and many consider it to be a drop-dead alternative for IDM (Internet Download Manager)—a commercial download manager —if not better.

Some of the other features of FDM are:

  • Supports download from HTTP and FTP sites.
  • Splits a large file into parts and downloads simultaneously.
  • Can choose three modes of traffic: Light, medium and heavy.
  • Schedule downloads and perform a set of actions once done.
  • Resume broken links if the server allows it.
  • Download videos from Youtube.
  • Import a list of URLs from the clipboard
  • Integrates well with most browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.
  • Bittorrent support based on libtorrent.
  • Drop box for file drag and drop.

Vote for FDM Linux version

The FDM developers posted a ‘features you want to see’ vote on Google forms asking the users to vote for features they would like to see next. One of those features is the long-awaited support for Linux. And despite it being a popular demand through the years, the feature is not even among the top 3.

It’s a golden opportunity to port FDM to the Linux ecosystem, many people converting to Linux from Windows miss it, and it doesn’t function 100% on Wine as many users reported.

So let’s put our effort and bring a popular software made available for Linux. Please vote for it on the Google Form link below. The option for Linux version is mentioned at number three at present.

Vote for FDM version for Linux

What’s the need of another download manager?

It’s a fundamental issue that goes far beyond FDM. Linux doesn’t have that many commercial software support and so people won’t use it, and when there is a chance for a popular software to be ported to Linux, the community should show support by voting for it. It’s all about making the Linux ecosystem user-friendly and to provide options for users who wish to adopt Linux as a main operating system.

Author detail: This article has been written by Muaad Elsharif, a teaching assistant, blogger and radio host from Tripoli, Libya. He is interested in Linux and open source solutions in general and likes to promote and help open source in his capacity.

From: It’s FOSS

How to Switch from GNOME to Unity in Ubuntu 17.10 [Quick Tip]

By Abhishek Prakash

How to switch to Unity from GNOME in Ubuntu 17.10

Brief: If you are feeling nostalgic, you can easily install Unity in Ubuntu 17.10. Here’s how to do it.

The most talked about feature of Ubuntu 17.10 is the switch to GNOME. Ubuntu has done quite a good job in making Unity users feel at home with the customized GNOME desktop.

But it is not necessary that you will like GNOME. Unity has been part of Ubuntu for last 6 years and over the time, it did gain its fair share of fan following.

If you are among the ones who have upgraded to Ubuntu 17.10 but want to use Unity instead of GNOME, you can easily do that.

However, I must warn you that I am not sure of the kind of support it has got in Ubuntu 17.10. If you face weird issues while using Unity 7, you can switch back to GNOME.

Install Unity 7 in Ubuntu 17.10

Open a terminal and use the command below to install Unity in Ubuntu 17.10:

sudo apt install unity

It will download files in size around 150 MB. Nothing else needs to be done.

Switch from GNOME to Unity in Ubuntu 17.10

Restart your system. Now, at the login screen, you’ll see a gear symbol. Click on it and you’ll see various options to switch to Xorg from Wayland. You’ll also see the option to switch to Unity. Just select Unity here.

Switch to Unity in Ubuntu 17.10

Log in and you’ll see the familiar Unity desktop environment. The Unity version thus installed is Unity 7.5.

Using Unity in Ubuntu 17.10

If you want to switch back to GNOME desktop, just select the option Ubuntu or Ubuntu on Xorg.

Remove Unity from Ubuntu 17.10

If you decided to stick with GNOME, you may perhaps want to remove Unity. Before you remove Unity, switch to GNOME.

And after that, use the following command to uninstall Unity:

sudo apt remove unity

sudo apt autoremove

I hope this quick tip helped you to use Unity in Ubuntu 17.10. Personally, I see no reasons for going back to Unity. It’s certainly not one of the things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10. What reasons do you have in mind?

From: It’s FOSS

How to Switch from GNOME to Unity in Ubuntu 17.10 [Quick Tip]

By Abhishek Prakash

How to switch to Unity from GNOME in Ubuntu 17.10

Brief: If you are feeling nostalgic, you can easily install Unity in Ubuntu 17.10. Here’s how to do it.

The most talked about feature of Ubuntu 17.10 is the switch to GNOME. Ubuntu has done quite a good job in making Unity users feel at home with the customized GNOME desktop.

But it is not necessary that you will like GNOME. Unity has been part of Ubuntu for last 6 years and over the time, it did gain its fair share of fan following.

If you are among the ones who have upgraded to Ubuntu 17.10 but want to use Unity instead of GNOME, you can easily do that.

However, I must warn you that I am not sure of the kind of support it has got in Ubuntu 17.10. If you face weird issues while using Unity 7, you can switch back to GNOME.

Install Unity 7 in Ubuntu 17.10

Open a terminal and use the command below to install Unity in Ubuntu 17.10:

sudo apt install unity

It will download files in size around 150 MB. Nothing else needs to be done.

Switch from GNOME to Unity in Ubuntu 17.10

Restart your system. Now, at the login screen, you’ll see a gear symbol. Click on it and you’ll see various options to switch to Xorg from Wayland. You’ll also see the option to switch to Unity. Just select Unity here.

Switch to Unity in Ubuntu 17.10

Log in and you’ll see the familiar Unity desktop environment. The Unity version thus installed is Unity 7.5.

Using Unity in Ubuntu 17.10

If you want to switch back to GNOME desktop, just select the option Ubuntu or Ubuntu on Xorg.

Remove Unity from Ubuntu 17.10

If you decided to stick with GNOME, you may perhaps want to remove Unity. Before you remove Unity, switch to GNOME.

And after that, use the following command to uninstall Unity:

sudo apt remove unity

sudo apt autoremove

I hope this quick tip helped you to use Unity in Ubuntu 17.10. Personally, I see no reasons for going back to Unity. It’s certainly not one of the things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10. What reasons do you have in mind?

From: It’s FOSS

Linux Foundation is Offering a Whopping 40% Discount on Cloud Certification Courses

By Abhishek Prakash

Linux Foundation Cloud deals

Brief: The Linux Foundation is offering a whopping 40% discount on its cloud training courses on Kubernetes, OpenStack and Cloud Foundry.

Open Source jobs are in demand. Cloud technologies are in demand.

Put two and two together and you can guess that having an open source cloud skills will easily land you a job in DevOps or help your career as a developer and system administrator.

If you have been thinking of learning some cloud technologies such as OpenStack, Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry, you are in luck.

The Linux Foundation, a non-profit organization that employs Linux creator Linus Torvalds, has several courses to train you on Linux related technologies that could help you build a career.

You can follow these online courses in your free time. When you purchase a course, you can access the course material for one year. You can also opt for a certification exam that is more valuable in job hunts.

Huge discount on cloud trainings from The Linux Foundation

Linux Foundation has three courses on Cloud related technologies. And the good news is that you can get 40% off for a limited time. Which means you can save up to $300.

All you have to do is to use the code CLOUD40 at the checkout time. The offer ends on 27th October so hurry up!!

Cloud Foundry for Developers

This course provides an introduction to foundational concepts, principles and best practices in Cloud Foundry and cloud-native architecture.

You should be an active developer, have basic knowledge of Linux command line and have familiarity with basic cloud computing concepts. Java/Spring, Node.js and/or Ruby is a plus.

You can opt just for the online course or you can add a certification exam as well. Pricing details can be found on the link below:

Cloud Foundry for Developers (LFS232)

Kubernetes

This online course is designed to help you start designing application orchestration solutions and know how they will work with Docker images.

It is suitable for both developers and sysadmins willing to learn how to deploy and administrate Kubernetes.

You can choose only the course, only certification exam or both of them. More details on the link below. If you are getting it, don’t forget to use the code CLOUD40.

Kubernetes Fundamentals (LFS258)

Open Stack administrator

This course intends to build the skills and knowledge necessary to effectively administer an OpenStack instance.

It is primarily focused on system admins but even developers responsible for deploying applications and infrastructure on OpenStack will benefit from it.

You can either get the course or double it up with the certification exam. More details on the link below:

Essentials of OpenStack Administration (LFS252)

Remember to use the coupon code CLOUD40 at the checkout time. And don’t forget that this offer expires on 27th October. So better hurry up!

From: It’s FOSS

Linux Foundation is Offering a Whopping 40% Discount on Cloud Certification Courses

By Abhishek Prakash

Linux Foundation Cloud deals

Brief: The Linux Foundation is offering a whopping 40% discount on its cloud training courses on Kubernetes, OpenStack and Cloud Foundry.

Open Source jobs are in demand. Cloud technologies are in demand.

Put two and two together and you can guess that having an open source cloud skills will easily land you a job in DevOps or help your career as a developer and system administrator.

If you have been thinking of learning some cloud technologies such as OpenStack, Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry, you are in luck.

The Linux Foundation, a non-profit organization that employs Linux creator Linus Torvalds, has several courses to train you on Linux related technologies that could help you build a career.

You can follow these online courses in your free time. When you purchase a course, you can access the course material for one year. You can also opt for a certification exam that is more valuable in job hunts.

Huge discount on cloud trainings from The Linux Foundation

Linux Foundation has three courses on Cloud related technologies. And the good news is that you can get 40% off for a limited time. Which means you can save up to $300.

All you have to do is to use the code CLOUD40 at the checkout time. The offer ends on 27th October so hurry up!!

Cloud Foundry for Developers

This course provides an introduction to foundational concepts, principles and best practices in Cloud Foundry and cloud-native architecture.

You should be an active developer, have basic knowledge of Linux command line and have familiarity with basic cloud computing concepts. Java/Spring, Node.js and/or Ruby is a plus.

You can opt just for the online course or you can add a certification exam as well. Pricing details can be found on the link below:

Cloud Foundry for Developers (LFS232)

Kubernetes

This online course is designed to help you start designing application orchestration solutions and know how they will work with Docker images.

It is suitable for both developers and sysadmins willing to learn how to deploy and administrate Kubernetes.

You can choose only the course, only certification exam or both of them. More details on the link below. If you are getting it, don’t forget to use the code CLOUD40.

Kubernetes Fundamentals (LFS258)

Open Stack administrator

This course intends to build the skills and knowledge necessary to effectively administer an OpenStack instance.

It is primarily focused on system admins but even developers responsible for deploying applications and infrastructure on OpenStack will benefit from it.

You can either get the course or double it up with the certification exam. More details on the link below:

Essentials of OpenStack Administration (LFS252)

Remember to use the coupon code CLOUD40 at the checkout time. And don’t forget that this offer expires on 27th October. So better hurry up!

From: It’s FOSS

9 Things to do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10

By Abhishek Prakash

Things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10

Brief: Here are the essential things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10 in order to give you a better and smooth experience after the fresh install of Ubuntu 17.10.

Ubuntu 17.10 is released. By now, you might have seen the new features in Ubuntu 17.10 and I recommend you should also start looking at Ubuntu 18.04 release date. If you are giving 17.10 a try with a fresh install, here I am listing a few things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10 that will make your experience with Ubuntu better.

If you are a new Ubuntu user, I also recommend reading this getting started guide with Ubuntu that will help you to understand Ubuntu and use it easily.

Things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10

Just to be clear, what to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10 depends upon you, the user. If you are into graphics design, you’ll like to install plenty of Linux graphics tools. If you are into Linux gaming, you might look for installing more Linux games and configuring your graphics card for that. If you are into programming, you would want to install programming tools, editors, IDEs etc.

This list here is mostly generic to put down things that should be useful for almost everyone, if not all. These steps mentioned here are surely helpful to most new Ubuntu users.

I have created a video so that it will be easier for you to see these steps in action. Do subscribe to our YouTube channel for more Ubuntu and Linux videos.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdi_dCfTluw?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent&w=640&h=390]

So, let’s begin with the written list of things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10:

1. Update your system

Whenever you do a fresh install of Ubuntu, update the system. It may sound strange because you just installed a fresh OS but still, you must run the updater.

I have experienced that if you don’t update the system right after installing Ubuntu, you might face issues while trying to install a new program. You may even see fewer applications to install.

To update your system, press Super Key (Windows Key) to launch the Activity Overview and look for Software Updater. Run this program. It will look for available updates. Install them.

Software Updater in Ubuntu 17.10

Alternatively, you can use the following command in the terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T):

sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade

2. Enable Canonical Partner repositories

Another must do thing is to enable Canonical Partner repositories. Ubuntu has a number of software available from its repositories. You can find them in the Software Center.

But you get even more software in the Software Center if you enable the Canonical Partner repositories. This additional repository consists of third-party software, often proprietary stuff, that have been tested by Ubuntu.

Go to Activity Overview by pressing Super Key (Windows key), and look for Software & Updates:

Software and Updates in Ubuntu 17.10

Open it and under the Other Software tab, check the option of Canonical Partners.

Enable Canonical Partners repository in Ubuntu 17.10

It will ask for your password and update the software sources. Once it completes, you’ll find more applications to install in the Software Center.

3. Install media codecs

By default, Ubuntu doesn’t provide a number of media codecs because of copyright issues. But it does provide an easy way to install these media codecs so that you could play MP3, MPEG4, AVI and a number of other media files.

You can install these media codecs thanks to Ubuntu Restricted Extra package. Click on the link below to install it from the Software Center.

Install Ubuntu Restricted Extras

Or alternatively, use the command below to install it:

sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras

4. Install software from the Software Center

Once you have upgraded the system and installed the codecs, it’s time to install some software. If you are rather new to Ubuntu, I suggest reading this detailed beginner’s guide to installing software in Ubuntu.

Basically, there are various ways to install software in Ubuntu. The easiest, most convenient and most reliable way is to use the Software Center to find and install new software.

You can open the Software Center to look for software to install in this graphical tool.

Software Center in Ubuntu 17.10

Alternatively, if you know what you are going to install just type the sudo apt install command to install it. Read the beginners guide to using apt commands in Ubuntu for more details on this command.

It is up to you but I can surely suggest a few applications that are on my list of things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10.

  • VLC media player for videos
  • GIMP – Photoshop alternative for Linux
  • Shutter – Screenshot application
  • Calibre – eBook management tool
  • Chromium – Open Source web browser
  • Kazam – Screen Recorder Tool
  • Gdebi – Lightweight package installer for .deb packages.

You can also refer to this list of must-have Linux applications for more software recommendations.

5. Install software from the web

You’ll find plenty of applications in the Software Center. But you’ll also find that many applications are not included in the Software Center despite the fact that they support Linux.

Actually, a number of software vendors package their software in .deb format that can be easily installed in Ubuntu. You can download the .deb files from their official websites and install them by double-clicking on it.

Some of the main software that I download and install from the web are:

  • Chrome web browser
  • Slack communication tool
  • Dropbox cloud storage service
  • Skype (the new beta version)
  • Viber instant messenger

6. Tweak the look and feel of Ubuntu 17.10

Ubuntu 17.10 uses GNOME desktop environment. While the default setup looks good, it doesn’t mean you cannot change it.

You can do some visual changes from the System Settings. Just search for System Settings in the Activity Overview and start it.

In the System Settings, you can change the wallpaper of the desktop and the lock screen, you can change the position of the dock (launcher on the left side), change power settings, Bluetooth etc. In short, you can find many settings that you can change as per your need.

Remember that there is no “set to default” button here so try to keep a track of changes you make to your system.

Ubuntu 17.10 System Settings

Let’s go further with tweaking the Ubuntu 17.10 system. You can install new icons and themes. But to change the themes and icons, you need to use GNOME Tweaks tool.

As some readers suggested, it is installed by default now. But if you cannoy find it, you can install it via the Software Center or you can use the command below to install it:

sudo apt install gnome-tweak-tool

Once installed, you can install new themes and icons.

Change theme is one of the must to do things after installing Ubuntu 17.10

7. Prolong your battery and prevent overheating

One of the best ways to prevent overheating in Linux laptops is to use TLP. Just install TLP and forget it. It works wonder in controlling CPU temperature and thus prolonging your laptops’ battery life in long run.

You can install it using the command below in a terminal:

sudo apt install tlp tlp-rdw

Once installed, run the command below to start it:

sudo tlp start

No need for any configuration changes (you can do that if you know what you are doing). It will be automatically started with each boot and tweak your system’s power consumption.

8. Save your eyes with Nightlight

Another one of favorite things. Keeping your eyes safe at night from the computer screen is very important. Reducing blue light helps to reduce eye strain.

flux effect

GNOME provides a built-in Night Light option and you can activate it in the System Settings.

Just go to System Settings-> Devices-> Displays and turn on the Night Light option.

Enabling night light is a must to do in Ubuntu 17.10

9. Moving back to Xorg from Wayland (if needed)

I have separately discussed moving back to Xorg from Wayland in Ubuntu 17.10. As Ubuntu 17.10 moves away from the legacy Xorg display server, not all desktop applications are compatible with the new Wayland display server.

I faced issues with screen recording tool and apps that depend on geolocation such as RedShift. And for this reason, I switched to Xorg from Wayland. It won’t change anything from the end user’s point of view, so you can be sure that switching to Xorg won’t harm your system.

To switch to Xorg from Wayland, log out of your system, at the login screen, click the gear icon and select Ubuntu on Xorg option:

Switch to xorg display server from Wayland

You can switch to Wayland in the same way,

What do you do after installing Ubuntu?

That was my suggestions for getting started with Ubuntu. Now it’s your turn. What steps do you recommend as things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10? The comment section is all yours.

From: It’s FOSS

9 Recommended Things to do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10

By Abhishek Prakash

Things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10

Brief: Here are the essential things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10 in order to give yourself a better and smoother experience after the fresh installation of Ubuntu 17.10.

Ubuntu 17.10 has been released. By now, you might have seen the new features in Ubuntu 17.10 and I recommend you should also start looking at Ubuntu 18.04 release date. If you are giving 17.10 a try with a fresh installation, here are a few things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10 that will make your experience with Ubuntu better.

If you are a new Ubuntu user, I also recommend reading this getting started with Ubuntu guide that will help you to understand Ubuntu and use it easily.

Things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10

Just to be clear, what to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10 depends upon you, the user. If you are into graphic design, you’ll want to install plenty of Linux graphics tools. If you are into Linux gaming, you might look for more Linux games and configure your graphics card for that. If you are into programming, you would want to install programming tools, editors, IDEs etc.

This list is a generic list of things that should be useful for most users if not all. The steps mentioned here are surely helpful to most new Ubuntu users.

I have created a video so that it will be easier for you to see these steps in action. Do subscribe to our YouTube channel for more Ubuntu and Linux videos.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdi_dCfTluw?enablejsapi=1&autoplay=0&cc_load_policy=0&iv_load_policy=1&loop=0&modestbranding=1&rel=0&showinfo=0&fs=1&theme=dark&color=red&autohide=2&controls=2&playsinline=0&&w=800&h=450]

So, let’s begin with the written list of things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10:

1. Update your system

Whenever you do a fresh installation of Ubuntu, update the system. It may sound strange because you just installed a fresh OS but still, you must run the updater.

It has been my experience that if you don’t update the system right after installing Ubuntu, you might face issues while trying to install a new program. You may even see fewer applications to install.

To update your system, press Super Key (Windows Key) to launch the Activity Overview and look for Software Updater. Run this program. It will look for available updates. Install them.

Software Updater in Ubuntu 17.10

Alternatively, you can use the following command in the terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T):

sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade

2. Enable Canonical Partner repositories

Another must do thing is to enable Canonical Partner repositories. Ubuntu has a variety of software available from its repositories. You can find it in the Software Center.

But you get even more software in the Software Center if you enable the Canonical Partner repositories. This additional repository consists of third-party software, often proprietary stuff, that have been tested by Ubuntu.

Go to Activity Overview by pressing Super Key (Windows key), and look for Software & Updates:

Software and Updates in Ubuntu 17.10

Open it and under the Other Software tab, check the option of Canonical Partners.

Enable Canonical Partners repository in Ubuntu 17.10

It will ask for your password and update the software sources. Once it completes, you’ll find more applications to install in the Software Center.

3. Install media codecs

By default, Ubuntu doesn’t provide a number of media codecs because of copyright issues. But it does provide an easy way to install these media codecs so that you could play MP3, MPEG4, AVI and a number of other media files.

You can install these media codecs thanks to Ubuntu Restricted Extra package. Click on the link below to install it from the Software Center.

Install Ubuntu Restricted Extras

Or alternatively, use the command below to install it:

sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras

4. Install software from the Software Center

Once you have upgraded the system and installed the codecs, it’s time to install some software. If you are rather new to Ubuntu, I suggest reading this detailed beginner’s guide to installing software in Ubuntu.

Basically, there are various ways to install software in Ubuntu. The easiest, most convenient and most reliable way is to use the Software Center to find and install new software.

You can open the Software Center to look for software to install in this graphical tool.

Software Center in Ubuntu 17.10

Alternatively, if you know what you are going to install just type the sudo apt install command to install it. Read the beginners guide to using apt commands in Ubuntu for more details on this command.

It is up to you but I can surely suggest a few applications that are on my list of things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10.

  • VLC media player for videos
  • GIMP – Photoshop alternative for Linux
  • Shutter – Screenshot application
  • Calibre – eBook management tool
  • Chromium – Open Source web browser
  • Kazam – Screen recorder tool
  • Gdebi – Lightweight package installer for .deb packages.

You can also refer to this list of must-have Linux applications for more software recommendations.

5. Install software from the Web

You’ll find plenty of applications in the Software Center. But you’ll also find that many applications are not included in the Software Center despite the fact that they support Linux.

Actually, a number of software vendors package their software in .deb format that can be easily installed in Ubuntu. You can download the .deb files from their official websites and install them by double-clicking on it.

Some of the main software that I download and install from the web is:

  • Chrome Web browser
  • Slack communication tool
  • Dropbox cloud storage service
  • Skype (the new beta version)
  • Viber instant messenger

6. Tweak the look and feel of Ubuntu 17.10

Ubuntu 17.10 uses GNOME desktop environment. While the default setup looks good, it doesn’t mean you cannot change it.

You can do some visual changes from the System Settings. Just search for System Settings in the Activity Overview and start it.

In the System Settings, you can change the wallpaper of the desktop and the lock screen, you can change the position of the dock (launcher on the left side), change power settings, Bluetooth etc. In short, you can find many settings that you can change as per your need.

Remember that there is no “set to default” button here so try to keep a track of changes you make to your system.

Ubuntu 17.10 System Settings

Let’s go further with tweaking the Ubuntu 17.10 system. You can install new icons and themes. But to change the themes and icons, you need to use GNOME Tweaks tool.

As some readers suggested, it is installed by default now. But if you cannot find it, you can install it via the Software Center or you can use the command below to install it:

sudo apt install gnome-tweak-tool

Once installed, you can install new themes and icons.

Change theme is one of the must to do things after installing Ubuntu 17.10

7. Prolong your battery and prevent overheating

One of the best ways to prevent overheating in Linux laptops is to use TLP. Just install TLP and forget it. It works wonder in controlling CPU temperature and thus prolonging your laptops’ battery life in the long run.

You can install it using the command below in a terminal:

sudo apt install tlp tlp-rdw

Once installed, run the command below to start it:

sudo tlp start

No need for any configuration changes (you can do that if you know what you are doing). It will be automatically started with each boot and tweak your system’s power consumption.

8. Save your eyes with Nightlight

Nightlight is another of my favorite things. Keeping your eyes safe at night from the computer screen is very important. Reducing blue light helps to reduce eye strain.

flux effect

GNOME provides a built-in Night Light option, which you can activate in the System Settings.

Just go to System Settings-> Devices-> Displays and turn on the Night Light option.

Enabling night light is a must to do in Ubuntu 17.10

9. Moving back to Xorg from Wayland (if needed)

I have separately discussed moving back to Xorg from Wayland in Ubuntu 17.10. As Ubuntu 17.10 moves away from the legacy Xorg display server, not all desktop applications are compatible with the new Wayland display server.

I faced issues with screen recording tools and with apps that depend on geolocation such as RedShift. For this reason, I switched to Xorg from Wayland. It won’t change anything from the end user’s point of view, so you can be sure that switching to Xorg won’t harm your system.

To switch to Xorg from Wayland, log out of your system, then, at the login screen, click the gear icon and select Ubuntu on Xorg option:

Switch to xorg display server from Wayland

You can switch to Wayland in the same way,

What do you do after installing Ubuntu?

Those were my suggestions for getting started with Ubuntu. Now it’s your turn. What steps do you recommend as things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10? The comment section is all yours.

From: It’s FOSS