Supreme Court won’t weigh in on Oracle-Google API copyright battle (Ars Technica)

By ris Ars Technica reports
that the US Supreme Court rejected Google’s appeal of the Google-Oracle API
copyright dispute. “Despite the high court’s inaction on the case, the Google-Oracle legal flap is far from resolved. That’s because the appeals court sent the case back to the lower courts to determine whether Google’s use of the code in Android—which it no longer uses—constitutes a “fair use.” Oracle is seeking $1 billion in damages.

“This is not the end of the road for this case—the Federal Circuit decision
explicitly left open the possibility that the kinds of uses Google made
were permissible under copyright’s fair use doctrine,” said Charles Duan,
the director of Public Knowledge’s patent reform project.” (Thanks
to Martin Michlmayr)

From: LWN

Share

R, Matey: Hoisting the Sails for a Programming Language

By Larry Cafiero Our friends at the Linux Foundation yesterday set sail wit the formation of the R Consortium, which includes such notorious pirates…um, I mean, notable companies as Oracle, Hewlett-Packard, Google and Microsoft, along with the other founders like Alteryx, Mango Solutions, Tibco Software, and we won’t be sailin’ without our mateys at, wait for it, RStudio. Of course, when you read that last one, you read it as Arrrrrr Studio, right? Right?

From: LXer

Share

[$] News and updates from DockerCon 2015

By jake

DockerCon on June 22 and 23 was
a much bigger affair than CoreOSFest or ContainerCamp was. DockerCon rented out
the San Francisco Marriott for the event; the keynote ballroom seats 2000.
That’s a pretty dramatic change from the first
DockerCon
last year, with roughly 500 attendees; it shows the huge
growth of interest in Linux containers. Or maybe, given that it’s Silicon
Valley, what you’re seeing is the magnetic power of $95 million in round-C
funding.

Subscribers can click below for a report from DockerCon by guest author
Josh Berkus.

From: LWN

Share

Supreme Court Won’t Hear Oracle v. Google Case, Leaving APIs Copyrightable And Innovation At Risk

By Mike Masnick This is unfortunate, even if it was somewhat expected: the Supreme Court has now rejected Google’s request to hear its appeal over the appeals court decision that overturned a lower court ruling on the copyrightability of APIs. The lower court decision, by Judge William Alsup (who learned to code Java to understand the issues), noted that APIs were not copyrightable, as they were mere methods, which are not subject to copyright.

From: LXer

Share