Q4OS Is a Bare-Bones Business Tool

By Jack M. Germain

Q4OS has the potential to become a new attention-getter among up and coming Linux distros. But this distro has a way to go before its development reaches full functionality. Right now it is working its way to a non-beta version 1.0 release. New beta versions are frequently released, often a few weeks to a month apart. The latest release was version 0.5.25 on February 4. This new distro is fast and runs extremely well on low-powered aging computers.

From: Linux Insider

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The Linux Kernel’s New ‘Play Nice’ Patch

By Jack M. Germain

Some 60 Linux kernel developers last week adopted a small “patch,” called the “Code of Conflict,” that attempts to set guidelines for discourse in the kernel community and outlines a path for mediation if someone feels abused or threatened. Linux creator Linus Torvalds posted the appeal for good behavior on his personal git.kernel.org page. Torvalds’ call for improved internal developer relations could be little more than wishful thinking, considering his own reputation for fueling heated community exchanges with brash comments.

From: Linux Insider

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Evolve OS Is a Clean and Light Work in Progress

By Jack M. Germain

I am always interested in new desktop approaches. That’s what drew my attention to Evolve OS. Normally, infant releases are too undeveloped to be the focus of a bona fide software review. This is not a criticism, but a reality of the work-in-progress nature of developing an OS. Evolve OS Beta has two innovations that distinguish it from the crowd of Linux distro newcomers. This new arrival is built around a home-made desktop called “Budgie” and a custom package manager forked from Pardus Linux.

From: Linux Insider

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RHEL 7 Atomic Host Bolsters Container Security

By Richard Adhikari

Red Hat last week made Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Atomic Host generally available, following a four-month live beta test. “The beta release was very successful,” said Lars Herrmann, senior director of product strategy at Red Hat. Feedback from customers and partners “helped us refine several features and tools” for the GA version. Atomic Host is a lean OS designed to run Docker containers, providing all the benefits of upstream distribution and the ability to perform atomic upgrades and rollbacks.

From: Linux Insider

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ChaletOS Is a Design Tweak in the Linux House

By Jack M. Germain

ChaletOS began as a personal project of developer Dejan Petrovic. Its name comes from the style of the mountain houses in Switzerland. Just as the Swiss Chalet is a distinctive design, so too is the look and feel of ChaletOS. This operating system has a familiar Windows-like style, with appealing simplicity and impressive speed. Much of that performance credit goes to the use of the Xfce desktop. Its system controls are tweaked to bring unique style-changing capabilities to a classic Linux desktop environment.

From: Linux Insider

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The Great War’s Untapped Video Game Opportunities

By Peter Suciu

Last year marked the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War. Known as “The Great War,” it claimed the lives of more than 10 million soldiers and about seven million civilians, ranking it among the deadliest conflicts in human history. With these numbers in mind, it’s understandable that WWI might be a taboo subject for entertainment purposes. Yet, it is fair to say that game developers have missed an opportunity with World War I.

From: Linux Insider

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Nvidia’s Shield Takes On Crysis With Confidence

By Quinten Plummer

Nvidia on Tuesday unveiled Shield, an Android TV console that in addition to playing content locally, can stream video games, movies, music, apps and more. Yes, it can play Crysis. That claim, a measure of a gaming PC’s power a few years ago, is how Nvidia is marketing the Shield console. Nvidia’s Shield Tablet led the way with its Tegra K1 processor and its ability to play Android ports of AAA games natively. The Shield console continues that progress by serving up some of some of the year’s biggest games either locally or through Nvidia’s cloud gaming service, Grid.

From: Linux Insider

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