Nvidia’s Shield Takes On Crysis With Confidence

By Quinten Plummer

Nvidia on Tuesday unveiled Shield, an Android TV console that in addition to playing content locally, can stream video games, movies, music, apps and more. Yes, it can play Crysis. That claim, a measure of a gaming PC’s power a few years ago, is how Nvidia is marketing the Shield console. Nvidia’s Shield Tablet led the way with its Tegra K1 processor and its ability to play Android ports of AAA games natively. The Shield console continues that progress by serving up some of some of the year’s biggest games either locally or through Nvidia’s cloud gaming service, Grid.

From: Linux Insider

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Android Pay: Mobile Payment Systems, Unite

By Richard Adhikari

Google this week confirmed that it’s preparing to launch a mobile payments framework called “Android Pay.” Google SVP of Product Sundar Pichai discussed the project at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. Android Pay will be an API layer of Android. Google will incorporate standard features for mobile payments, such as tokenized card numbers, into an Android Pay software development kit. Developers and device manufacturers will be able to use the framework to build payments into their own apps.

From: Linux Insider

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The Open Source Squad at the GSA

By Jack M. Germain

A team of open source evangelists is working within the General Services Administration as part of a federal initiative for more transparent government use of technology. 18F, a development unit within the GSA, was established a year ago to tap into the success of the United Kingdom’s Government Digital Services unit by pursuing a similar strategy. The unit is tasked with getting developers from Silicon Valley and the ranks of civic developers all over the country to change how federal technology gets done.

From: Linux Insider

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Pearl OS Could Be a Gem in the Making

By Jack M. Germain

If you favor the OS X environment, Pearl OS might be a Linux distro to feed your fancy.
Pearl OS is a revival of the discontinued Pear OS distro. It picks up where Pear left off in early 2014. Pearl OS has two desktop versions: XFCE and MATE. Both are based on Ubuntu Linux distro version 14.04 Mini release. The two flavors of Pearl OS are customized to look and act like the OS X operating system. But Pearl is Linux and not OS X. This distro runs Debian-based Linux applications. It does not run OS X software or have actual OS X functions.

From: Linux Insider

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Open Source vs. Proprietary Firms on the IoT Battleground

By Jack M. Germain

Technology wars are predictable. Every new wave of gadgetry brings a fight over who will be the next king of the software hill. The next big battle is brewing over control of the Internet of Things marketplace. Consumers see only convenience and extensions to their always-on mobile devices. Product makers see a pathway to streaming data that can be monetized from buyers’ connections. Will history repeat itself, as open source begins to take on the current, yet unsustainable, walled-garden core of the IoT?

From: Linux Insider

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HP’s Marten Mickos: Open Source Is Not a Business Model

By Jack M. Germain

Marten Mickos, SVP and general manager of HP’s cloud unit, preaches what at first glance may appear to be two opposing business models. One is the notion that developing open source software entails meeting a reciprocity requirement. The other is the idea that using open source software does not require any reciprocity. Mickos is a seasoned open source executive with a passion for infrastructure software. In learning to adapt his business strategies to make open source profitable, Mickos succeeded where many others have failed.

From: Linux Insider

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Pivotal Punts Big Data Platform to Open Source

By Jack M. Germain

Pivotal on Wednesday announced its decision to open source all of the core components of its big data platform, becoming the first big data industry player to do so. The company also announced its participation in the Open Data Platform, which seeks to encourage more enterprise collaboration, along with the adoption of modern, scalable data architectures. The opening of the Pivotal Big Data Suite follows Pivotal’s success last year with open sourcing its Cloud Foundry.

From: Linux Insider

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