Cyanogen Taps Truecaller in Effort to Build a Better Mobile OS

By Richard Adhikari

Cyanogen, best known for its FOSS Android-based OS, CyanogenMod, soon will provide caller ID screening and spam blocking directly from the native dialer on Cyanogen OS, the commercial version of its operating system. These capabilities will be provided through the company’s global partnership with Truecaller. They will be baked into future smartphone devices preloaded with Cyanogen OS. “I’m wondering whether Truecaller is addressing an actual need of smartphone users,” mused Werner Goertz, a research director with Gartner.

From: Linux Insider

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Voyager-X Will Take You on a New Xfce Journey

By Jack M. Germain

Voyager-X 10.14.4, released in March, is based on Xubuntu/Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. This new Voyager-X is one of the first distros to use the new Xfce 4.12 desktop. Ubuntu has yet to implement it, and few other Linux distros have put the new update into play. Thus, the latest Xfce desktop is considered “experimental.” However, it is a fully functional upgrade. Voyager-X adds to this the Linux kernel 3.16, for a faster and more responsive OS that is optimized for better performance and offers much improved hardware support.

From: Linux Insider

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EMC’s ViPR Slithers Into Open Source

By Jack M. Germain

EMC on Wednesday announced it will release its commercial ViPR software storage controller technology as an open source project called “CoprHD.” The ViPR software controller puts the control functionality and the data services into separate operational planes, allowing different data services to be layered onto a set of storage hardware products and cloud storage. Project CoprHD is EMC’s first foray into the open source marketing model. Any success it has will boost EMC’s commercial development as well.

From: Linux Insider

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Mumblehard Malware Mugs Linux Servers

By Richard Adhikari

A family of Linux malware targeting Linux and BSD servers has been lurking around for five years, Eset has reported. Dubbed “Linux/Mumblehard,” the malware contains a backdoor and a spamming daemon, both written in Perl. The components are mainly Perl scripts encrypted and packed inside an executable and linkable format, or ELF, said Eset. In some cases, one ELF executable with a packer nests inside another. An Eset sinkhole saw more than 8,800 unique IP addresses over seven months. Web servers are the most susceptible to the attack.

From: Linux Insider

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FOSSers Puzzle Over Significance of Open Source .Net Core

By Richard Adhikari

Microsoft last week released a preview of the next version of its .Net Core runtime distribution, fulfilling last fall’s pledge to open source .Net and take it cross-platform for Mac and Linux. “Windows 10 is and will be a standard .Net platform, and improving the interoperability of .Net builds bridges from those platforms to Windows 10, effectively augmenting the developer community available to Microsoft and exposing the portfolio of apps they create to Microsoft platforms,” said Black Duck Software’s Bill Weinberg.

From: Linux Insider

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Vivid Vervet Doesn’t Have Much Meat on Its Bones

By Jack M. Germain

You will not see much new in Ubuntu 15.04, aka “Vivid Vervet” — as in East African monkey — unless you peer under the hood. The release of Ubuntu 15.04 for the desktop includes mostly maintenance and bug fixes, along with new integrated menus and dashboard usability improvements. Perhaps the most significant technical change in this desktop release is the adoption of Systemd to replace the default init manager system. A significant number of continuing Linux distros are joining the SystemD party line.

From: Linux Insider

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VMware Draws on Open Source to Manage Cloud Micro Services

By Jack M. Germain

VMware last week released details about two new open source projects that aim to bridge the divide between the company’s virtualization software and other vendors’ containers. Both projects integrate into VMware’s unified platform for the hybrid cloud. Project Lightwave and Project Photon could tip sides in the ongoing debate within cloud computing and virtualization markets over running containers on standalone hardware or in virtual machines with virtualization software.

From: Linux Insider

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