Infected Android Apps From Google Play Affect Millions

By Richard Adhikari

Millions of Android users have been hit by malware posing as games on Google Play, according to Avast security researcher Flip Chytry. The malware harbors fake ads that pop up when users unlock their devices, to warn them about nonexistent infections, or that their devices are out of date or have porn. Victims are then asked to take action. If they agree, they are redirected to poisoned Web pages that contain a variety of hazards. Google spokesperson Elizabeth Markman did not confirm how many devices had been hit.

From: Linux Insider

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Good and Samsung Partner to Harden Android Security

By Jack M. Germain

Good Technology on Tuesday announced a merger of its app container and app ecosystem with the Samsung KNOX enterprise security platform for Android. The product merger is the next step in the partnership aimed at eliminating virus and malware concerns that come with Android adoption in the enterprise. The hardened security for Android targets the OS’s deployment with U.S. government and Department of Defense agencies. Good Technology’s solution creates a secured domain within Samsung’s KNOX security-enhanced Android operating system.

From: Linux Insider

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Docker-Rocket Conflict is a Good Sign

By Jay Lyman

2014 saw the rise of Docker, and ended with appropriately inflated hype and hysteria around a related container technology: Rocket. Immediately, discussions of uncertainty and doubt, and the familiar fear of forking unfolded. Would this be the end of Docker and a new beginning for container technology? Was it only a matter of time before some developers or organizations splintered off from the Docker community with their own container technology?

From: Linux Insider

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Balancing Diversity and Creativity in the World of FOSS

By Jack M. Germain

The Linux community is filled with friction and diversity. One of the advantages of open source software is the diversity that leads to innovative approaches to improve the computing environment. But can the diversity go too far? Is it a defining characteristic that kills programming creativity? LinuxInsider spoke with a panel of open source developers about the creative versus destructive nature of the seemingly fractured world of open source.

From: Linux Insider

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Open Source at the Front of the Class

By Jack M. Germain

Open source is sitting at the head of the class in a growing number of schools with all levels of education. Its no-cost starting point and use-it-your-way flexibility gives open source technology an advantage over proprietary solutions with its no-license and no-fee lesson plan. For many education outlets looking to bring a fresh approach to technology, open source is an easy selling point. Don’t think so? LinuxInsider spoke with several technology administrators around the country who gave their open source experiences a solid A+.

From: Linux Insider

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Google Gives WebView the Cold Shoulder

By Richard Adhikari

Google has decided not to fix vulnerabilities in WebView for Android 4.3 and older, sparking heated discussions among developers. Those versions of WebView run on the WebKit browser. Fixing them “required changes to significant portions of the code and was no longer practical to do so safely,” explained Adrian Ludwig, lead engineer for Android security. Ludwig recommended steps users and developers can take to mitigate the potential exploitation of WebView vulnerabilities without updating to Lollipop, or Android 5.0.

From: Linux Insider

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There’s a GHOST in Linux’s Library

By Jack M. Germain

Patches for GHOST, a critical vulnerability in glibc, the Linux GNU C Library, now are available through vendor communities for a variety of Linux server and desktop distributions. Qualys earlier this week reported its discovery of GHOST, a vulnerability that allows attackers to remotely take control of an entire system without having any prior knowledge of system credentials. Qualys security researchers found the GHOST flaw and worked closely with Linux distribution vendors in a coordinated effort to develop a patch for all affected systems.

From: Linux Insider

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Debian Forked: All for Devuan and Devuan for All?

By Jack M. Germain

A group of developers made good on their threats to fork Debian Linux late last year, after the community’s leadership voted to replace sysvinit with systemd, making systemd the default init boot process. The Debian Technical Committee’s decision spurred several key Debian developers and project maintainers to resign. Some of them formed a new community dedicated to developing a forked Debian Linux distro called “Devuan,” pronounced “DevOne.” The split is largely philosophical.

From: Linux Insider

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Zenwalk Linux – A Walk on the Quirky Side

By Jack M. Germain

The developmental path and sketchy developer website may cast an unfavorable impression about Zenwalk’s trustworthiness as a serious computing platform. The ho-hum impression when first running the live edition does little to encourage users to take this Linux OS for a stroll. Zenwalk Linux becomes a bit more impressive once you get beyond the awkward first-time experience, but it comes with a number of problems that might be prohibitive for a new user looking for an all-purpose Linux OS.

From: Linux Insider

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Acer Designs Chromebooks for Students’ Rough Handling

By Jack M. Germain

Acer on Wednesday announced two new ruggedized Chromebooks geared for classroom use. Both will go on sale in February. The Acer Chromebook C910 and C740 have a durable design built around reinforced covers and hinges. The new models support multiple user sign-ons and offline file access. Security features include a Kensington lock to secure the laptop to a wireless cart or lab station. A Web-based management console allows remote management of apps and policies across all Chromebooks in a school network.

From: Linux Insider

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