Some of tech’s biggest names get their Swagger on for open APIs

By Jon Gold

A new umbrella group dedicated to making sure that different pieces of software can interact with each other smoothly has backing from Google, Microsoft, PayPal and IBM, among others, the Linux Foundation announced today.

The new Open API Initiative will focus on creating a technical community in which members can build on the Swagger specification for APIs, with the idea being to ensure a vendor-neutral standard for apps that are trying to communicate with each other.

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From: Network World

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What’s behind the odd couple Microsoft-Red Hat partnership

By Brandon Butler

No, hell has not frozen over, but yes Microsoft and Red Hat have announced a major partnership today.

In a collaboration that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago, Microsoft – the purveyor of the mainstream and proprietary Windows OS – has partnered with Red Hat, the champion of an enterprise-class iteration of Linux. And analysts say the move is good for both companies.

+MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: You built a cloud and now they want containers? | Microsoft pumps up Azure ahead of Amazon’s big cloud conference +

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From: Network World

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Microsoft finally ties the knot with Red Hat for Linux on Azure

By Katherine Noyes

In a move many consider long overdue, Microsoft and Red Hat on Wednesday announced a new partnership through which Microsoft will offer Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the preferred choice for enterprise Linux workloads on Azure.

Azure will become a Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider sometime in the next few weeks, making it possible at last for Red Hat Cloud Access subscribers to bring their own virtual machine images to run on Microsoft’s cloud platform.

Microsoft has long offered Azure support for other Linux distributions, but Red Hat’s key enterprise offering has been conspicuously absent.

“When I first heard the news, I wanted the title of the announcement to be, ‘Hell has frozen over,'” quipped Gary Chen, a research manager with IDC. “I never thought it would really happen, but it finally did.”

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From: Network World

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The Gaming Paradox: There just aren’t enough Free and Open Source video games

By Bryan Lunduke

I have, of late, become rather inflexible in my demand for Free and Open Source Software in all aspects of my life.

Hell. I’m even at the point where I can’t seem to write the words “Free Software” without capitalizing the first letters of each word. Free. Software. See? Can’t do it. And I just tried REALLY hard.

What’s become of me? I’ve turned into one of those FOSS-thumping goofballs I used to make fun of.

But I do seem to have one weakness. One thing that keeps pulling me back to the warm, yet constrictive, embrace of proprietary software: Games.

I love video games. My childhood memories are wall-to-wall games. I spent a large portion of my past career as a software developer working on games. In my house there are life-size statues of Mario and Fox McCloud. For several years my dining room table consisted of three cocktail arcade tables pushed together (Pac-Man, Arkanoid, and Space Duel).

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From: Network World

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5 dead operating systems, and what their ghosts can tell us

By Ian Paul

Tremble, mortals! Halloween is upon us. Ghosts, ghouls, and other undesirable creatures are prepared to slink out of their domains and into ours—it’s said that even the dead can rise on Halloween.

In that spirit, let us light some candles, cover the mirrors, and conduct a séance of sorts to call forth the souls of operating systems past. Not so we can gaze upon their ghastly interfaces, but to see if we can learn anything from their digital carcasses and signs of a life well-lived—or not. Who knows, perhaps they bring secrets from beyond the grave.

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From: Network World

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Happy Distrovus: 3 big Linux Distros released in 8 days

By Bryan Lunduke

I love autumn.

For so many reasons. The temperature drops just enough to justify wearing a blazer (which I feel naked without) and we, as a people, have a renewed focus on holidays where you do nothing but eat copious quantities of food. Without a doubt, the best time of the year.

Perhaps the most important reason of all to love this glorious season: we call an end to the dry spell of no new major Linux distribution releases – the dark, boring time that most people refer to as “Summer.”

The end of October through the beginning of November is sort of a sacred, holy period for Linux nerds across the globe.

Kicking things off, on Thursday, October 22nd, Ubuntu 15.10 was released. You better believe I upgraded my Ubuntu 15.04 partition to 15.10 the moment it was available.

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From: Network World

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