Linux smartphones took a serious step back in 2015

By Bryan Lunduke

2015 was such a hopeful year for Linux on smartphones. At the beginning of the year, there was so much hope for what could be.

The promise of Ubuntu Touch being available on shipping devices was alluring. FirefoxOS phones were already shipping… and the future was looking bright. And Jolla was gearing up for a new iteration of their Linux-powered OS, along with a shiny new tablet to go with it.

Then – at the #mozlando conference on Tuesday, December 8th – Mozilla announced that they would no longer be working with carriers to ship Firefox OS phones. Mozilla issued the following statement, via TechCrunch:

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From: Network World

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Microsoft to offer a Linux-based cert for Azure admins

By Jon Gold

Microsoft’s newfound embrace of open-source software continues with the news today that the company will now offer a Linux on Azure certificate through its Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate program.

Those who pass both Microsoft’s 70-533 exam and the Linux Foundation’s Certified System Administrator exam will receive the Linux on Azure cert from the MCSA program. The cert is available as of today, according to a joint announcement.

+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: 11 top IaaS cloud computing certifications + Are people abandoning Windows 10?

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From: Network World

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Linux holiday gift guide 2015

By Bryan Lunduke

linux holiday gifts 1
Give the gift of Linux

Regardless of which of the various winter holidays you happen to celebrate, one thing remains certain: you’re going to be buying someone a present (possibly even yourself). And you’d really like it to be running Linux. Because you’re awesome. And that’s what awesome people would like. What follows are, what I consider to be, the most fun and/or interesting Linux-powered gadgets that would make awesome gifts this year. In order, from cheapest to… significantly less cheap. Let us begin.

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From: Network World

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Can you keep Linux-based ransomware from attacking your servers?

By David Geer

According to SophosLabs, Linux/Ransm-C ransomware is one example of the new Linux-based ransomware attacks, which in this case is built into a small command line program and designed to help crooks extort money through Linux servers.

“These Linux ransomware attacks are moving away from targeting end users and gravitating toward targeting Linux servers, web servers specifically, with a piece of software that encrypts data and is similar to what we’ve seen in previous years such as CryptoWall, CryptoLocker, and their variants,” explains Bill Swearingen, director of Cyber Defense, CenturyLink.

As long as attackers can leverage the ease of coding strong encryption and the high availability of anonymous currencies and anonymous hosting, ransomware is here to stay, says Swearingen. With security organizations like SophosLabs seeing and tracking new variants of Linux ransomware, enterprises should make themselves aware of its risks and cures, since as server owners, users, or operators they are prime targets.

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From: Network World

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The future of tiny, powerful computers is here

By Bryan Lunduke

When I first started my adventures with Linux – back in the late 1990s with SuSE (the “u” was lowercase back then) version 6.SomethingOrOther – my computer was a large, heavy, loud, metal rectangle.

It was beige. And it was expensive. I probably spent more on that beast of a computer than I probably should have.

Flash forward to today – some 15-odd years later – and my life is filled with reasonably priced, astoundingly portable computers capable of running Linux far better than that old monolith on my desk could ever dream of. Literally. Sub-$10 computers are not only performing better than that old 1990’s relic of mine, they’re also performing better than my laptops from barely more than five years ago.

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From: Network World

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What would the perfect Linux distro look like?

By Bryan Lunduke

As I review one Linux distribution or another, I find myself uttering phrases like “This is pretty good! Almost makes me want to switch my system to this,” over and over again. So many distributions of Linux are truly fantastic – but usually with a caveat. Something that stops me from making them my primary system.

Which begs the question… What does the perfect Linux distribution (or Linux-based operating system) look like for me?

If I throw out all of my preconceptions of various distros, and ignore any sense of brand or community loyalty that I have (let’s be honest… we all have at least a little bit of that) and focus purely on what that makes up that perfect system… what would it look like?

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From: Network World

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Review: Ubuntu GNOME 15.10 is what vanilla Ubuntu should be

By Bryan Lunduke

I reviewed Ubuntu 15.10 (along with openSUSE Leap 42.1 and Fedora 23) a little over a week ago.

And, you know what? It is really solid. I’d go so far as to say it is the most excellent release of Ubuntu since they made the switch to the Unity desktop environment many years back.

But… that’s a bit of a problem. Since Ubuntu is so laser-sight focused on their in-house developed Unity environment, other environments simply don’t work as well. I experienced multiple problems trying to run GNOME on vanilla Ubuntu 15.10 – and had similar issues with KDE Plasma.

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From: Network World

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