Here’s a look Inside Dell’s strategy for Linux PCs

By Agam Shah

In a world of PCs dominated by Windows and Macs, Dell’s line of “Project Sputnik” laptops with Ubuntu Linux have secured a cult following.

The latest Project Sputnik laptop is the XPS 13 Developer Edition, which shipped last week. With its sleek design, the XPS 13 brings a new, sexy look to otherwise dull Linux laptop designs.

The XPS 13 DE is also significant because it brings new technologies from the Mac OS and Windows to Linux laptops. The XPS 13 DE models have 4K screens, Intel Skylake chips and the Thunderbolt 3 interconnect, which are new to Linux laptops.

The Linux laptop is a cousin of the XPS 13 with Windows 10, which was announced earlier this year. The Linux version has Ubuntu 14.04, but it couldn’t be launched at the same time because the Linux drivers weren’t ready. Support for Skylake chips in Ubuntu was announced on Feb. 18, which also held back the laptop’s release.

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From: Network World

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VMware fixes XSS flaws in vRealize for Linux

By Fahmida Y. Rashid

VMware patched two cross-site scripting issues in several editions of its vRealize cloud software. These flaws could be exploited in stored XSS attacks and could result in the user’s workstation being compromised.

The input validation error exists in Linux versions of VMware vRealize Automation 6.x prior to 6.2.4 and vRealize Business Advanced and Enterprise 8.x prior to 8.2.5, VMware said in the advisory (VMSA-2016-0003). Linux users running affected versions should update to vRealize Automation 6.2.4 and vRealize Business Advanced and Enterprise 8.2.5 to address the problems. The issues do not affect vRealize Automation 7.x on Linux and 5.x on Windows, and vRealize Business 7.x and 6.x on Linux (vRealize Business Standard).

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From: Network World

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Microsoft continues Linux lovefest with open source network software SONiC

By Brandon Butler

From: Network World

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Red Hat Linux to run on Qualcomm server chips

By Agam Shah

Qualcomm has been established in mobile devices for some time now, but it’s still trying to jumpstart the market for its chips in servers. So in an effort to exploit advanced features on its server chips and appeal to as many developers as possible, Qualcomm is working with Red Hat to port a version of the Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview.

All Qualcomm server and mobile chips are based on processor architecture from ARM, whose business model is based on licensing out its designs to different manufacturers. Servers based on ARM-architecture, though, are almost nonexistent commercially. A full port of the Red Hat OS will allow developers to write applications for Qualcomm’s server chips.

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From: Network World

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Microsoft is bringing its crown jewel SQL Server to Linux

By Blair Hanley Frank

When Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella extolled his company’s love for Linux — an open source operating system it previously opposed — it would be natural to assume that commitment came with a few caveats. On Monday, the company doubled down on its love for open source in one of the most surprising ways possible.

SQL Server, one of the most popular pieces of database server software, and a crown jewel of Microsoft’s enterprise software empire, is coming to Linux.

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From: Network World

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Microsoft is bringing its crown jewel SQL Server to Linux

By Blair Hanley Frank

When Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella extolled his company’s love for Linux — an open source operating system it previously opposed — it would be natural to assume that commitment came with a few caveats. On Monday, the company doubled down on its love for open source in one of the most surprising ways possible.

SQL Server, one of the most popular pieces of database server software, and a crown jewel of Microsoft’s enterprise software empire, is coming to Linux.

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From: Network World

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FAQ: What the heck happened to Linux Mint?

By Jon Gold

Linux Mint is one of the most popular desktop distributions of Linux in the world, so when the organization suffered a serious security breach late last month, it made waves in the open-source community.

Q: What, exactly, happened?

On Saturday, Feb. 20, somebody noticed that the download link for certain versions of the operating system on Mint’s official website had been changed. The fiddled-with link now pointed to a malicious website, hosted in Bulgaria.

+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Google CSO peers out from the fishbowl to talk security + RSA president slams crypto backdoors as useful only against petty criminals

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From: Network World

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