10 more pointless (but awesome) Linux terminal tricks

By Bryan Lunduke

linux terminal tricks
10 more pointless (but awesome) Linux terminal tricks

One year ago, I put together a list of my favorite “pointless but awesome” Linux terminal tricks—filled with such classics as making a cow talk with “cowsay” and rainbow-coloring your terminal with “lolcat.” As was correctly pointed out to me at the time, there are a lot of ridiculous (but cool) things you can do in the terminal that didn’t make that list. So, here’s round two. You’re welcome. (Note: Some of these you will need to install using apt-get, zypper or whatever package manager your Linux distribution uses.)

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From: Network World

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IDG Contributor Network: The shift in open source: A new kind of platform war

By Neela Jacques

For many years, open source software seemingly lay at the fringe of the tech industry. A subculture that many didn’t understand and that seemingly threatened the broader industry. It is amazing how much has changed.

Today, open source software, especially Linux, is so pervasive that you probably interact with it every day. From supercomputers to GoPros and nearly every data center in the world, open source software is the default platform.

+ More on Network World: Open source: Career-maker, or wipeout? +

Not only does almost every company (and government agency) leverage open source software in some capacity, but even vendors who fought it tooth and nail have finally turned around. Microsoft’s embrace of open source software under Satya Nadella is a great example of the massive change in perception that has been slowly creeping over the industry over the past 20 years.

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From: Network World

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Open Data Platform Initiative looks to ease fears

By Thor Olavsrud

VANCOUVER, BC — Last year’s foundation of the Open Data Platform Initiative (ODPi), a collaborative project of The Linux Foundation that aims to reduce complexity surrounding the Hadoop ecosystem, made waves in certain parts of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) concerned by the creation of an external organization that could exert influence over Apache projects.

At the Apache: Big Data North America conference in Vancouver, BC this week, the ODPi moved to ease those concerns through dialog and sponsorship of the ASF.

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From: Network World

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What does the future of the Apache Software Foundation hold?

By Thor Olavsrud

The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) will hold its second annual Apache: Big Data North America conference in Vancouver, BC, starting Monday next week. Alongside keynotes from companies like Netflix and IBM, and panels on a huge range of topics — from security and storage to managing distributed systems and machine learning — the foundation will also host a forum that looks to cut to the heart of its community model and how private companies should be involved in its work.

On Wednesday afternoon, Jim Jagielski, senior director in the Tech Fellows program at Capital One and one of the developers and founders of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF), and John Mertic director of Program Management for ODPi and Open Mainframe Project at The Linux Foundation, will host a panel dubbed ODPi and ASF Collaboration: Ask Us Anything!.

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From: Network World

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Open-source really could help get you a job, study finds

By Jon Gold

Experience in the open-source world is a valuable asset for technology job-seekers, and it’s getting more so over time, according to the latest Open-Source Jobs Report, which was published today by Dice and the Linux Foundation.

The report, which surveyed tech hiring managers, found that nearly two-thirds were planning to increase open-source hiring more than other areas of their business in the near future, and that 59% had definite plans to add open-source workers.

+ ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: A look at Apple’s rise in the enterprise with IBM’s help | Former insider’s book explores morality of offshore outsourcing +

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From: Network World

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Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

By Bryan Lunduke

Back in 2007, I went to O’Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON). That particular year Canonical had a mini-summit, which happened in the two days before OSCON, called Ubuntu Live.

I honestly don’t remember much about any of the sessions I attended all those years ago. But one memory stands out like a spotlight pointed straight at my face: almost every single laptop I saw in use at Ubuntu Live was a MacBook.

Nearly every single one. Row after row of little glowing Apple logos filling every conference room. And this was at Ubuntu’s first big conference—a conference filled to the brim with Linux (and Ubuntu) developers and power users.

We’re not talking Apple hardware running Linux, either. I made a point of asking people what they were running (or just glancing at the screens as I walked by). Were a few running Linux? Yes. A few. But the majority were running Mac OS X. The vast majority.

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From: Network World

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Highly social Linux nerds worth following

By Bryan Lunduke

linux social media
Social Linux butterflies

When most people think of “Linux nerds,” the first phrase that comes to mind typically isn’t “super-duper social.” But it should be. If you’ve ever been to a Linux convention, you’ve seen these social Linux butterflies firsthand. And that social nature extends to social media as well.

What follows is a carefully crafted cross section of some incredibly interesting Linux nerds from the various social networks. These are not companies or projects; we’re talking about actual people, speaking for themselves, who are uniquely relevant in the Linux world.

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From: Network World

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