German court addresses GPLv3 section 8 termination provisions (Opensource.com)

By ris Opensource.com takes
a look
at a court case in Germany addressing the GPLv3 termination
provisions. “In the Halle court case, the defendant, a higher education institution in Germany, offered certain software for download to its employees and students. The plaintiff provided a written warning of copyright infringement based on a GPL violation to the defendant, including a cease-and-desist declaration with a penalty clause. The defendant refused to sign the declaration but removed the software from its website. The plaintiff filed for a preliminary injunction.

The court ruled that the plaintiff was entitled to a preliminary injunction. The defendant had made the plaintiff’s copyrighted software publicly available and was in violation of both GPLv2 and GPLv3 as the defendant had not accompanied the software with the license text and the complete corresponding source code.”

From: LWN

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[$] Checksum offloads and protocol ossification

By corbet Given the processing requirements for high-speed networking, it is not
surprising that there is interest in offloading some of that work to
dedicated hardware. Linux has always carefully limited the support
provided for such offloading, though; it has been just over ten years since
support for TCP offload engines was
definitively blocked from entering the
Linux network stack. That rejection was driven by a number of concerns,
with a reluctance to entrust network-protocol processing to closed-source,
unextendable,
unfixable software being near the top of the list. Nearly ten years later,
offload engines are again the topic of fierce discussion. The hardware has
changed, but the concerns have not; indeed, some of the problems being
worked around now show why those concerns were valid in the first place.

From: LWN

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Security updates for Tuesday

By ris

CentOS has updated libxml2 (C6: multiple vulnerabilities).

Debian-LTS has updated bouncycastle (invalid curve attack) and linux-2.6 (multiple vulnerabilities).

Fedora has updated audiofile
(F22: buffer overflow), LibRaw (F23: two
vulnerabilities), and python-django (F23: information disclosure).

openSUSE has updated thunderbird
(Leap42.1: multiple vulnerabilities).

Oracle has updated libxml2 (OL7; OL6: multiple vulnerabilities).

Red Hat has updated git (RHEL7:
code execution) and kernel (RHEL7: denial of service).

SUSE has updated java-1_7_0-ibm
(SLE11SP3: many vulnerabilities).

Ubuntu has updated libsndfile (multiple vulnerabilities).

From: LWN

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NetHack 3.6.0 released

By corbet Version 3.6.0 of the
NetHack dungeon adventure game has been released. This is the first
official release in over ten years. “Unlike previous releases,
which focused on the general game fixes, this release consists of a series
of foundational changes in the team, underlying infrastructure and changes
to the approach to game development. Those of you expecting a huge raft of
new features will probably be disappointed. Although we have included a
number of new features, the focus of this release was to get the foundation
established so that we can build on it going forward.
” There has
been enough change, though, that old save files will not work with this
version.

From: LWN

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It’s actually open source software that’s eating the world (VentureBeat)

By corbet For a far-outside view, it’s hard to beat this
VentureBeat article
, wherein a venture capitalist talks about how
“open-source companies” are taking over. “The OSS companies that
will be pillars of IT in the future are the companies that leverage a
successful OSS project for sales, marketing, and engineering prioritization
but have a product and business strategy that includes some proprietary
enhancements. They’ve figured out that customers are more than happy to pay
for an enterprise-grade version of the complete product, which may have
security, management, or integration enhancements and come with
support. And they also understand that keeping this type of functionality
proprietary won’t alienate the community supporting the project the way
something such as a performance enhancement would.

From: LWN

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Apple releases Swift

By ris Apple has released its Swift programming language under the Apache 2.0 license, and it’s available for Linux. The code can be found on GitHub. “Swift makes it easy to write software that is incredibly fast and safe by design. Now that Swift is open source, you can help make the best general purpose programming language available everywhere.

From: LWN

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