Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Alpha 1 Arrives with MATE 1.14 Built Entirely Against GTK 3.18

By Softpedia News (Marius Nestor)

Today, June 30, 2016, Martin Wimpress informs Softpedia about the immediate availability of the first Alpha release of the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 16.10 operating system, as part of the Yakkety Yak Alpha 1 announcement.

Powered by the same Linux 4.4 LTS kernel as Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), the first Alpha of Ubuntu MATE 16.10 ships with the MATE 1.14 desktop environment, which has been built entirely against the GTK+ 3.18 GUI toolkit to be less resource hungry, much-improved versions of the MATE Tweak, Software Boutique, MATE Dock Applet, MATE Menu, and Ubuntu MATE Welcome in-house built tools.

“Beaut, beauty! We’re stoked to announce Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Alpha 1, the first dist… (read more)

From: Softpedia

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Ubuntu 16.10 Alpha 1 Is Out for Opt-in Flavors, Final Release to Land October 13

By Softpedia News (Marius Nestor)

Believe it or not, the development cycle of the next Ubuntu release has started, and a first Alpha build is now officially released, today, June 30, 2016, as expected based on the release schedule for Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak).

As some of you might very well be aware of, the two Alpha release and the first Beta in the development cycle of a new Ubuntu Linux version are only for the opt-in flavors. Unfortunately, as we reported the other day, only three Ubuntu flavors are participating in the Ubuntu 16.10 Alpha 1 release, namely Ubuntu MATE, Lubuntu, and Ubuntu Kylin.

We’ve been monitoring the development of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) since the first daily builds were made available for download, and until today, we can report that no major changes have been done to the operating system, which ships pretty much with the same core components and applications as Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

Therefore, Ubuntu 16.10 Alpha 1 ships today with Linux kernel 4.4 LTS, s… (read more)

From: Softpedia

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Linux Mint 18 Screenshot Tour

A new project called X-Apps was started and its goal is to produce generic applications for traditional GTK desktop environments. The idea behind this project is to replace applications which no longer integrate properly outside of a particular environment (this is the case for a growing number of GNOME applications) and to give our desktop environments the same set of core applications, so that each change, each new feature being developed, each little improvement made in one of them will benefit not just one environment, but all of them.

From: LXer

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Extracting Qualcomm’s KeyMaster Keys – Breaking Android Full Disk Encryption (Bits Please)

By corbet The “Bits Please” blog has a
detailed description
of how one breaks full-disk encryption on an
Android phone. Included therein is a lot of information on how full-disk
encryption works on Android devices and its inherent limitations.
Instead of creating a scheme which directly uses the hardware key
without ever divulging it to software or firmware, the code above performs
the encryption and validation of the key blobs using keys which are
directly available to the TrustZone software! Note that the keys are also
constant – they are directly derived from the SHK (which is fused into the
hardware) and from two ‘hard-coded’ strings.
Let’s take a moment to explore some of the implications of this
finding.

From: LWN

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etcd 3.0 released

By corbet CoreOS has announced the
availability of version 3.0 of the etcd distributed key-value store.
etcd 3.0 marks the first stable release of the etcd3 API and data
model. Upgrades are simple, because the same etcd2 JSON endpoints and
internal cluster protocol are still provided in etcd3. Nevertheless, etcd3
is a wholesale API redesign based on feedback from etcd2 users and
experience with scaling etcd2 in practice. This post highlights some
notable etcd3 improvements in efficiency, reliability, and concurrency
control.

From: LWN

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Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) on CentOS 7 (Initiator and Target)

This guide explains how you can set up an AoE target and an AoE initiator (client), both running CentOS 7. AoE stands for “ATA over Ethernet” and is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows AoE initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) AoE target using normal ethernet cabling. “Remote” in this case means “inside the same LAN” because AoE is not routable outside a LAN (this is a major difference compared to iSCSI). To the AoE initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.

From: LXer

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