Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) released

By corbet The Ubuntu 17.10 release is out. “Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including
a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more.

Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as
our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there
are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and
Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice.”
See the
release notes
for more information.

From: LWN

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Security updates for Thursday

By corbet Security updates have been issued by CentOS (wpa_supplicant), Debian (db, db4.7, db4.8, graphicsmagick, imagemagick, nss, and yadifa), Fedora (ImageMagick, rubygem-rmagick, and upx), Mageia (flash-player-plugin, libxfont, openvpn, ruby, webmin, and wireshark), openSUSE (cacti, git, and upx), Oracle (wpa_supplicant), Red Hat (kernel-rt, rh-nodejs4-nodejs-tough-cookie, rh-nodejs6-nodejs-tough-cookie, and wpa_supplicant), Scientific Linux (wpa_supplicant), and Slackware (libXres, wpa_supplicant, and xorg).

From: LWN

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[$] KRACK, ROCA, and device insecurity

By jake

Monday October 16 was not a particularly good day for those who are
even remotely security conscious—or, in truth, even for those who aren’t. Two
separate security holes came to light; one probably affects almost all
users of modern technology. The other is more esoteric at some level, but
still serious. In both cases, the code in question is baked into various
devices, which makes it more difficult to fix; in many cases, the devices
in question may not even have a plausible path toward a fix. Encryption
has been a boon for internet security, but both of these vulnerabilities
have highlighted that there is more to security than simply cryptography.

From: LWN

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Tips to Secure Your Network in the Wake of KRACK (Linux.com)

By corbet Konstantin Ryabitsev argues
on Linux.com that WiFi security is only a part of the problem.
Wi-Fi is merely the first link in a long chain of communication
happening over channels that we should not trust. If I were to guess, the
Wi-Fi router you’re using has probably not received a security update since
the day it got put together. Worse, it probably came with default or easily
guessable administrative credentials that were never changed. Unless you
set up and configured that router yourself and you can remember the last
time you updated its firmware, you should assume that it is now controlled
by someone else and cannot be trusted.

From: LWN

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[$] Achieving DisplayPort compliance

By jake

At the X.Org Developers Conference, hosted by Google in Mountain View, CA
September 20-22, Manasi Navare gave a talk about her journey learning
about kernel graphics on the way to achieving DisplayPort (DP)
compliance for Intel graphics devices.
Making that work involved learning about DP, the kernel graphics subsystem,
and how to do
kernel development, as well. There were plenty of details to absorb,
including the relatively new atomic mode
setting support, the design of which was described in a twopart LWN
article.

From: LWN

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Ruiz: Fleet Commander: production ready!

By corbet Alberto Ruiz announces
that Fleet Commander is ready for production use.
Fleet Commander is an integrated solution for large Linux desktop
deployments that provides a configuration management interface that is
controlled centrally and that covers desktop, applications and network
configuration. For people familiar with Group Policy Objects in Active
Directory in Windows, it is very similar.

From: LWN

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