Tiny Core: Small Footprint, Big Potential

By Jack M. Germain

Tiny Core Linux 8.0, released last week, is a minimalist Linux OS built from scratch with a focus on being as small as possible. That means you should be able to run this Linux distro on a wide range of legacy machines. The tradeoff for ultra smallness, however, often is a not-so-powerful OS that can leave you longing for better options. The Core Project is based on a highly modular system with community build extensions or applications. This is more a set of building blocks than a finely tuned distro.

From: Linux Insider

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Anbox Could Be the Android-to-Linux Tool Devs Have Been Waiting For

By David Jones

The ability to run Android apps natively in a Linux desktop environment is a step closer to realization, thanks to Anbox, a new open source project. Simon Fels, who is the lead software engineer at Canonical, last week debuted a pre-alpha release of the Anbox platform, which he has been working on independently since 2015. “It was born out of the idea of putting Android into a simple container based on LXC and bridging relevant parts over to the host operating system while not allowing any access to real hardware or user data,” Fels said.

From: Linux Insider

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Kingsoft Adds Cloud Support to WPS Office

By Jack M. Germain

Kingsoft on Tuesday announced that it has expanded its WPS Office suite to include WPS Cloud. The upgrade enables users to work in a cross-platform office suite environment with added storage, file roaming and sharing capabilities. The cloud-enhanced version is available for PCs and mobile as a fully functional free release and with premium subscriptions. It runs on Linux, Windows, Mac and Android devices. The free version is ad-supported. Today’s mobile users are accustomed to ad-supported apps and other software, according to Kingsoft.

From: Linux Insider

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Shuttleworth Gives Up Hope for Convergence Breakthrough

By David Jones

Canonical’s long and winding quest for a unified user experience came to a sudden halt on Wednesday, as founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the firm’s decision to stop investing in its struggling Unity8 shell and revert to Gnome for its Ubuntu 18.04 LTS desktop OS release. The Unity plan was to create a user interface that could work on various types of devices, ranging from a mobile phone to a personal computer or tablet. The project had been the subject of rampant speculation over the past couple of years, as public updates were scarce.

From: Linux Insider

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Fatdog64: More Bark Than Bite

By Jack M. Germain

Fatdog64 has the potential to serve as an alternative lightweight OS to Linux distros such as Puppy Linux, Knoppix and Zephyr. However, it has some critical usability issues that need to be fixed first. Fatdog64 seems to have lost its performance edge over earlier versions that made it more appealing as an alternative “frugal” Linux candidate. The numerous Puppy Linux derivatives and Knoppix have solid reputations for fast and efficient performance on older, less powerful desktop and portable computers.

From: Linux Insider

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Take Command of Your Linux System’s Processes

By Jonathan Terrasi

Who’s afraid of the Linux terminal? Not you, if you’ve learned the basics of navigating your system. But how will these newly acquired skills help improve your computing life? To give you a sense of the terminal’s everyday usefulness, here are some examples of tasks the terminal is well-disposed to handle. To start with, system administration is much more straightforward on the terminal. The operating system manages silent background services, or “daemons,” in order to keep your computer’s many programs running seamlessly.

From: Linux Insider

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Samsung’s Tizen OS Riddled With Security Holes

By John P. Mello Jr.

There are more than three dozen previously unknown flaws that pose a potential threat to consumers using some Samsung TVs, watches and phones, a security researcher has reported. Hackers could exploit the vulnerabilities found in Samsung’s Tizen OS to gain remote access and control of a variety of the company’s products, according to Amihai Neiderman, head of research at Equus Software. Neiderman presented his findings at a security conference sponsored by Kapersky Lab. Tizen is running on some 30 million smart TVs and other devices.

From: Linux Insider

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