Get started podcasting and producing video on Linux

By Bryan Lunduke

Interested in producing your own podcast or video series entirely from a free software-fueled, Linux-powered computer? Here’s how I accomplish that task.

Feel free to copy my exact setup for your own use. Or take some of my recommendations. Or ignore everything I say here and do things better than I do. Either way, hopefully this proves useful in your Linux-fueled media production endeavors.

Podcasting and video hardware

The hardware setup for my daily recording is fairly simple. More often than not, I utilize a Blue USB Yeti microphone. It has exceptionally good sound (especially for the roughly $100 price tag) and functions as a sound device on every modern Linux distribution I’ve encountered.

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From: Network World

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Linux Foundation smushes two smaller projects together to form Open Networking Automation Platform

By Jon Gold

The Linux Foundation announced yesterday that it had combined open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project into ONAP, the Open Networking Automation Platform, with the aim of helping users automate network service delivery, design, and service through a unified standard.

Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, said that ONAP should be a boon to enterprise IT departments, thanks to improved speed and flexibility.

+MORE ON NETWORK WORLD: FCC rolls back net neutrality ISP transparency rules + Brocade’s Ruckus Wi-Fi business finds a buyer

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From: Network World

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Eleven-year-old root flaw found and patched in the Linux kernel

By Lucian Constantin

Linux system administrators should be on the watch for kernel updates because they fix a local privilege escalation flaw that could lead to a full system compromise.

The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2017-6074, is over 11 years old and was likely introduced in 2005 when the Linux kernel gained support for the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). It was discovered last week and was patched by the kernel developers on Friday.

The flaw can be exploited locally by using heap spraying techniques to execute arbitrary code inside the kernel, the most privileged part of the OS. Andrey Konovalov, the Google researcher who found the vulnerability, plans to publish an exploit for it a few days.

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From: Network World

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How to communicate from a Linux shell: Email, instant messaging

By Bryan Lunduke

I get a lot of questions on how to perform various tasks from a Linux shell/terminal. In the interest of making a simple cheat sheet—something I can point people to that will help them get rolling with terminal powers—what follows are my recommendations for how to perform various types of communication from your shell.

I’m talking about the normal sort of communication most people perform via a web browser (or a handful of graphical applications) nowadays: Email, instant messaging, that sort of thing. Except, you know, running them entirely in a terminal—which you can run just about anywhere: in an SSH session on a remote server, on a handheld device, or even on your Android phone/tablet.

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From: Network World

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7 features Linux could borrow from other systems

By Bryan Lunduke

1 intro slide Linux features
7 features Linux distros should add

Image by Linux

Linux (or, GNU/Linux, if you prefer) distributions are absolutely amazing—stable, fast, flexible. Your average Linux-based system is a veritable powerhouse of functionality—a tour de force of what computers can accomplish. But from time to time, other operating systems have some pretty great ideas. Here are seven of my personal favorites that Linux distributions might want to consider “borrowing.” Hint, hint. Nudge, nudge.

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From: Network World

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Munich’s great Linux desktop initiative may end

By Andy Patrizio

A decade ago, there was much hoopla over the city of Munich discarding Windows desktops in favor of Linux, which were thought to be more secure and cheaper to deploy and maintain.

Well, that experiment is coming to an end. TechRepublic reports the city is prepared to shift gears and allow users once again to choose Windows for their work PC instead of Linux after complaints of poorer productivity and compatibility issues. But it’s not going to happen overnight; the Windows option won’t come until 2021.

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From: Network World

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Open source users: It’s time for extreme vetting

By Paul Krill

Open source software is the norm these days rather than the exception. The code is being written in high volumes and turning up in critical applications. While having this code available can offer big benefits, users also must be wary of issues the code can present and implement proper vetting.

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From: Network World

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