Building Linux-powered devices, part 1: Making my Linux-only world a reality

By Bryan Lunduke

Sometimes, if you want something badly enough, you need to get off your lazy tuchus and make it happen yourself.

For years now, I’ve been hoping and pining (and often complaining and whining) about how much I want Linux-powered… everything. Not Android. Not ChromeOS. Real Linux. The kind of Linux you have full control over—the sort you’d install on your desktop PC.

And when I say “everything,” I mean everything. The set-top box connected to my TV. My game consoles (including handheld game consoles). Tablets. PDAs. Home server. The works.

All of it. Running Linux and free software.

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From: Network World

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HPE offers an escape from the aging HP-UX OS via containers

By Agam Shah

Hewlett Packard Enterprises’ HP-UX OS has been around for more than 30 years, and users may be looking to move on from the Unix-based OS.

Now HPE is offering a way out of the ancient OS using containers, which are small buckets running instances of applications. The containers will be offered with the Linux OS.

HPE will provide containers to transition from conventional mainframe-style OSes to new hardware like x86-based Xeon servers. In this case, HPE is trying to get users to transition from Itanium chips.

Intel started shipping its last Itanium 9700 chips — codenamed Kittson — on Thursday. Correspondingly, HPE announced new Integrity i6 servers with the new chips. But the future of HP-UX servers is uncertain because Intel has no new Itanium chips beyond Kittson.

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From: Network World

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18 things you should know about using Linux tools in Windows 10

By Mary Branscombe

Last year Microsoft added an unusual new feature to Windows 10: Linux support. The Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) — sometimes called Bash on Windows — is “Microsoft’s implementation of a Linux-compatible infrastructure that runs atop and within the Windows kernel,” senior program manager Rich Turner tells CIO.com. That means running Linux binaries without leaving Windows.

“Bash on Windows offers a toolset for developers, IT administrators and other tech professionals that want or need to run Linux command-line tools alongside their Windows tools and applications,” Turner explains. Developed with the help of Canonical (and a large community of Linux users), it’s not there to turn Linux into Windows, or Windows into Linux. It’s just that some Linux tools are so ubiquitous for development and deployment that it’s useful to be able to use them without spinning up a virtual machine (VM). That’s one of the reasons Macs are so popular with developers: MacOS is based on BSD, which is UNIX, so it can run Linux tools like Bash. And now, so can Windows 10.

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From: Network World

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Linux Foundation to develop tool for building blockchain business networks

By Lucas Mearian

The Linux Foundation announced a new software project under its Hyperledger open consortium aimed at creating a collaboration tool for building blockchain business networks — or smart contracts — and their deployment across a distributed ledger.

The new project, called Hyperleder Composer, is a modeling language based on JavaScript and with REST API support, that allows non-developers and developers to model their business network. The language also supports modeling of relationships and data validation rules.

For example, all blockchain business networks share certain elements, such as assets, participants, identities, transactions, and registries. With existing blockchain or distributed ledger technologies, it can be difficult for organizations to take a blockchain business use case and map the concepts into running code.

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From: Network World

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Red Hat nicely positioned for the turn to cloud

By John Dix

Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst kicked off the company’s Summit meeting in Boston this week, which attracted more than 6,000 people, up 20% from last year. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with Whitehurst at the show for an update on the company’s position and prospects.

One of your keynote speakers said 84% of Red Hat customers have cloud deployment strategies. Is the shift to cloud accelerating your business?

I do think the shift to cloud is helping. We have data that shows our customers who use cloud actually grow faster in total with us than ones who don’t. The promise of cloud accelerates the Unix-to-Linux migration as people modernize applications to be able to move to cloud — whether they move immediately or not — because clouds primarily run Linux. In general, anything that makes people move to a new architecture is good for us because we have a high share of new architecture relative to old. I think that’s a big, big driver.

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From: Network World

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10 Unix commands every Mac and Linux user should know

By Steven Nunez

GUIs are great—we wouldn’t want to live without them. But if you’re a Mac or Linux user and you want to get the most out of your operating system (and your keystrokes), you owe it to yourself to get acquainted with the Unix command line. Point-and-click is wonderful whenever you need to do something once or twice. But if you need to repeat that task many times, the command line is your savior.

The command line is a window into the full, awesome power of your computer. If you long to break free of the constraints of the GUI or think that programming or administering remote machines is in your future, then learning the Unix command line is definitely for you.

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From: Network World

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I’m excited for a new Ubuntu release—for the first time in a long time

By Bryan Lunduke

It’s been many years since I regularly used Ubuntu. Back in “ye olden times” I would consider myself one of the most outspoken advocates for Canonical’s Linux distribution—often proclaiming the (near) perfection of Ubuntu—but those times have long since faded into the mist.

Nowadays, I use Ubuntu only when there is a good reason to review a new release—which has happened less and less. And even in those cases, I tend to use it sparingly.

There were many reasons for that change. Mostly it boiled down to a general disagreement with the direction Ubuntu was taking.

+ Also on Network World: Lessons learned from the failure of Ubuntu Touch +

I wasn’t a fan of their in-house developed desktop environment (Unity). I didn’t like how slow it was. I didn’t like how buggy it was. I didn’t like how un-customizable it was. I guess it would be fair to say, “I didn’t like it.”

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From: Network World

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