10 Unix commands every Mac and Linux user should know

By Steven Nunez

GUIs are great—we wouldn’t want to live without them. But if you’re a Mac or Linux user and you want to get the most out of your operating system (and your keystrokes), you owe it to yourself to get acquainted with the Unix command line. Point-and-click is wonderful whenever you need to do something once or twice. But if you need to repeat that task many times, the command line is your savior.

The command line is a window into the full, awesome power of your computer. If you long to break free of the constraints of the GUI or think that programming or administering remote machines is in your future, then learning the Unix command line is definitely for you.

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From: Network World

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I’m excited for a new Ubuntu release—for the first time in a long time

By Bryan Lunduke

It’s been many years since I regularly used Ubuntu. Back in “ye olden times” I would consider myself one of the most outspoken advocates for Canonical’s Linux distribution—often proclaiming the (near) perfection of Ubuntu—but those times have long since faded into the mist.

Nowadays, I use Ubuntu only when there is a good reason to review a new release—which has happened less and less. And even in those cases, I tend to use it sparingly.

There were many reasons for that change. Mostly it boiled down to a general disagreement with the direction Ubuntu was taking.

+ Also on Network World: Lessons learned from the failure of Ubuntu Touch +

I wasn’t a fan of their in-house developed desktop environment (Unity). I didn’t like how slow it was. I didn’t like how buggy it was. I didn’t like how un-customizable it was. I guess it would be fair to say, “I didn’t like it.”

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From: Network World

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Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux!

By Rand Morimoto

A couple years ago Microsoft embarked on a “Microsoft Loves Linux” initiative to bring Linux into the fold of everything Microsoft. For a company that has traditionally been known for Windows and Office that has not historically been seen as particularly too Linux friendly, there was a bit of a stretch of the imagination how Microsoft and Linux would end up playing well together.

Roll forward a couple years, with the world very much a cloud-based environment, and 1 out of every 3 virtual machines running in Microsoft’s Azure Cloud being a Linux system (and growing), along with more and more Linux growth in the Microsoft ecosystem, the vision of a couple years ago is now very much a reality.

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From: Network World

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Lessons learned from the failure of Ubuntu Touch

By Bryan Lunduke

With the death of yet another open source/free software/Linux-based mobile platform, Ubuntu Touch, clearly it is time for us to sit down and have a frank discussion about what we in the free software world can reasonably accomplish in a mobile platform.

One of the biggest issues—if not THE biggest issue—with Ubuntu Touch was that it simply had goals that were far too aggressive to reasonably achieve. It suffered from the all-too-common malady known in software development as feature creep.

Ubuntu Touch was not simply a project to bring the existing Ubuntu system to mobile hardware and add functionality specific to that hardware (such as phone dialing, cell data, etc.). The project also contained:

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From: Network World

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IDG Contributor Network: The big news at DockerCon 2017 was no big news

By James Thomason

The biggest news from DockerCon 2017, the semi-annual conference on Linux containerization, was the lack of big news. After the last two years of feverish development, there are signs one of the hottest trends in tech might be slowing down.

“I’m not sure,” said one software developer loitering just outside of the Austin Convention Center. That was the most common response to my question, “What was the biggest news at DockerCon this year?” I must have asked 30 people that question over my two days at the event. An informal, unscientific polling of my Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook connections has been similar.

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From: Network World

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Ubuntu Phone security updates end in June, app store closing

By Bryan Lunduke

From: Network World

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39% off Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux, Paperback – Deal Alert

By DealPost Team

The Raspberry Pi’s most famous feature is its adaptability. It can be used for thousands of electronic applications, and using the Linux OS expands the functionality even more. This book, Exploring Raspberry Pi, is the innovators guide to bringing Raspberry Pi to life. The book favors engineering principles over a ‘recipe’ approach to give you the skills you need to design and build your own projects. You’ll understand the fundamental principles in a way that transfers to any type of electronics, electronic modules, or external peripherals, using a “learning by doing” approach that caters to both beginners and experts. The book begins with basic Linux and programming skills, and helps you stock your inventory with common parts and supplies. Next, you’ll learn how to make parts work together to achieve the goals of your project, no matter what type of components you use. The companion website provides a full repository that structures all of the code and scripts, along with links to video tutorials and supplementary content that takes you deeper into your project. The list price has been reduced 39% on Amazon, from $35 to $21.40. See this deal now on Amazon. A complete Raspberry Pi starter kit can be purchased here for $89.99.

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From: Network World

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