[$] Point releases for the GNU C Library

By corbet The GNU C Library (glibc) project produces regular releases on an
approximately six-month cadence. The current release is 2.26
from early August; the 2.27 release is expected at the beginning of
February 2018. Unlike many other projects, though, glibc does not normally
create point releases for important fixes between the major releases.
The last point release from glibc was 2.14.1, which came out in 2011.
A discussion on the need for a 2.26 point release led to questions about
whether such releases have a useful place in the current
software-development environment.

From: LWN

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DragonFly BSD 5.0

By ris DragonFly BSD 5.0 has been released. “Preliminary HAMMER2 support has been released into the wild as-of the 5.0 release. This support is considered EXPERIMENTAL and should generally not yet be used for production machines and important data. The boot loader will support both UFS and HAMMER2 /boot. The installer will still use a UFS /boot even for a HAMMER2 installation because the /boot partition is typically very small and HAMMER2, like HAMMER1, does not instantly free space when files are deleted or replaced.

DragonFly 5.0 has single-image HAMMER2 support, with live dedup (for cp’s), compression, fast recovery, snapshot, and boot support. HAMMER2 does not yet support multi-volume or clustering, though commands for it exist. Please use non-clustered single images for now.”

From: LWN

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Millions of high-security crypto keys crippled by newly discovered flaw (Ars Technica)

By jake Ars Technica is reporting on a flaw in the RSA library developed by Infineon that drastically reduces the amount of work needed to discover a private key from its corresponding public key. This flaw, dubbed “ROCA”, mainly affects key pairs that have been generated on keycards. “While all keys generated with the library are much weaker than they should be, it’s not currently practical to factorize all of them. For example, 3072-bit and 4096-bit keys aren’t practically factorable. But oddly enough, the theoretically stronger, longer 4096-bit key is much weaker than the 3072-bit key and may fall within the reach of a practical (although costly) factorization if the researchers’ method improves.

To spare time and cost, attackers can first test a public key to see if it’s vulnerable to the attack. The test is inexpensive, requires less than 1 millisecond, and its creators believe it produces practically zero false positives and zero false negatives. The fingerprinting allows attackers to expend effort only on keys that are practically factorizable. The researchers have already used the method successfully to identify weak keys, and they have provided a tool here to test if a given key was generated using the faulty library. A blog post with more details is here.”

From: LWN

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Security updates for Monday

By ris Security updates have been issued by Debian (wpa), Fedora (perl, recode, and tor), Gentoo (elfutils, gnutls, graphite2, libtasn1, puppet-agent, shadow, and webkit-gtk), Mageia (pjproject, thunderbird, and weechat), and SUSE (kernel).

From: LWN

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An enforcement clarification from the kernel community

By corbet The Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns
about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together
this patch adding a document to the kernel
describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed
or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers.
In particular, it seeks to
reduce the effect of the “GPLv2 death penalty” by stating that a violator’s
license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to
compliance. “We view legal action as a last resort, to be initiated
only when other community efforts have failed to resolve the problem.

Finally, once a non-compliance issue is resolved, we hope the user will feel
welcome to join us in our efforts on this project. Working together, we will
be stronger.”

See this
blog post from Greg Kroah-Hartman
for more information.

From: LWN

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“KRACK”: a severe WiFi protocol flaw

By corbet The “krackattacks” web site
discloses a set of WiFi protocol flaws that defeat most of the protection
that WPA2 encryption is supposed to provide. “In a key
reinstallation attack, the adversary tricks a victim into reinstalling an
already-in-use key. This is achieved by manipulating and replaying
cryptographic handshake messages. When the victim reinstalls the key,
associated parameters such as the incremental transmit packet number
(i.e. nonce) and receive packet number (i.e. replay counter) are reset to
their initial value. Essentially, to guarantee security, a key should only
be installed and used once. Unfortunately, we found this is not guaranteed
by the WPA2 protocol
“.

From: LWN

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Kernel prepatch 4.14-rc5

By corbet The 4.14-rc5 kernel prepatch is out.
We’ve certainly had smaller rc5’s, but we’ve had bigger ones too, and
this week finally felt fairly normal in a release that has up until
now felt a bit messier than it perhaps should have been.

So assuming this trend holds, we’re all good. Knock wood.”

From: LWN

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