[$] Redesigning Python’s named tuples

By jake

Deficiencies in the startup time for
Python
, along with the collections.namedtuple()
data structure
being identified as part of the problem, led Guido van Rossum to decree
that named tuples should be optimized. That immediately set off a
mini-storm of thoughts about the data structure and how it might be
redesigned in the original python-dev thread, but Van Rossum directed
participants
over to python-ideas, where a number of alternatives were discussed. They
ranged from straightforward tweaks to address the most pressing performance
problems to elevating named tuples to be a new top-level data
structure—joining regular tuples, lists, sets, dictionaries, and so on.

From: LWN

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[$] The supposed decline of copyleft

By jake

At DebConf17, John Sullivan, the executive director of the FSF,
gave a talk on the supposed decline of the use of
copyleft licenses in free-software projects. In his presentation, Sullivan
questioned the notion that permissive licenses, like the BSD or MIT
licenses, are gaining ground at the expense of the traditionally dominant
copyleft licenses from the FSF. While there does seem to be a rise in
the use of permissive licenses, in general, there are several possible
explanations for
the phenomenon.

From: LWN

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The D-Bus Broker project

By corbet The D-Bus Broker Project is an effort to rethink the D-Bus message bus and
produce an implementation that addresses many of its longstanding problems;
this project has now made its first public release. “Its aim is to
provide high performance and reliability, while keeping compatibility to
the D-Bus reference implementation. It is exclusively written for linux
systems, and makes use of many modern features provided by recent linux
kernel releases.
” See this
post
for an introduction to the project, or the GitHub page for
source. This is a purely user-space implementation.

From: LWN

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[$] Two more approaches to persistent-memory writes

By corbet The persistent-memory arrays we’re told we’ll all be able to get someday
promise high-speed, byte-addressable storage in massive quantities. The
Linux kernel community has been working to support this
technology fully for a few years now, but there is one problem lacking a proper
solution: allowing direct writes to persistent memory that is managed by a
filesystem. None of the proposed solutions have yet made
it into the mainline, but that hasn’t stopped developers from trying; now
two new patch sets addressing this issue are under consideration.

From: LWN

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[$] LuaTeX comes of age

By jake The release of the 2017 version of TeX Live had plenty of incremental
improvements for the TeX
computer typesetting system and the myriad of tools that go with it. One
of the more significant changes, though, was the release of the 1.0.4
version of LuaTeX, which allows users to embed Lua programs into their TeX
documents. That ability allows creating non-standard and unusual
typesetting effects much more easily than it would be with TeX itself.
Guest author Lee Phillips gives an overview of LuaTeX and shows some of the
things that can be accomplished using it.

From: LWN

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