AWS Lambda and the Spectrum of Compute

By RedMonk

Amazon fully understand the reality of the compute spectrum, but they are also completely focused on making it easier and easier to begin new development projects on Lambda for a wide variety of scenarios. This makes perfect sense, as we noted previously Serverless is volume compute for a new generation of applications, with significant upside for the providers in usage of adjacent services, and also an efficient disruptor of established processes.

From: Linux.com

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General Data Protection Regulation: A Checklist to Compliance

By HPE

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is perhaps the most sweeping data privacy law in history. Within its nearly 100 articles, it outlines new requirements for organizations that have access to the personal information of European Union (EU) citizens, giving average consumers far more power over how their data is used.

Failure to comply will mean heavy fines of approximately $24 million (€20 million), or 4% of a company’s global annual revenue — whichever is greater.

From: Linux.com

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Meltdown and Spectre Fallout Leads to First RC9 of a Linux Kernel Since 2011

By The Inquirer

In an almost unprecedented move, Linus Torvalds has delayed the release of a final build of the Linux Kernel 4.15, instead announcing an unusual ninth release candidate, the first time he had felt he has to do so since 2011.

And you can be fairly sure that Torvalds is not happy with the release because everyone has been busy dealing with the fallout from Meltdown and Spectre, even though the impact on Linux is minimal.

From: Linux.com

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The Meaning of Open

By HackerNoon

There are a lot of misconceptions about what open means, when it is the right strategy to apply, and the fundamental tradeoffs that go along with it. It’s very easy to cargo-cult the notion of open — using it in an imprecise or half-baked way that can obscure the real dynamics of an ecosystem, or even lead you in the wrong strategic direction. Here are a few important things to know about openness in the context of ecosystems.

From: Linux.com

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Unix: Dealing with Signals

By Network World

On Unix systems, there are several ways to send signals to processes—with a kill command, with a keyboard sequence (like control-C), or through your own program (e.g., using a kill command in C). Signals are also generated by hardware exceptions such as segmentation faults and illegal instructions, timers and child process termination.

But how do you know what signals a process will react to? After all, what a process is programmed to do and able to ignore is another issue.

From: Linux.com

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