How to communicate from a Linux shell: Email, instant messaging

By Bryan Lunduke

I get a lot of questions on how to perform various tasks from a Linux shell/terminal. In the interest of making a simple cheat sheet—something I can point people to that will help them get rolling with terminal powers—what follows are my recommendations for how to perform various types of communication from your shell.

I’m talking about the normal sort of communication most people perform via a web browser (or a handful of graphical applications) nowadays: Email, instant messaging, that sort of thing. Except, you know, running them entirely in a terminal—which you can run just about anywhere: in an SSH session on a remote server, on a handheld device, or even on your Android phone/tablet.

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From: Network World

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7 features Linux could borrow from other systems

By Bryan Lunduke

1 intro slide Linux features
7 features Linux distros should add

Image by Linux

Linux (or, GNU/Linux, if you prefer) distributions are absolutely amazing—stable, fast, flexible. Your average Linux-based system is a veritable powerhouse of functionality—a tour de force of what computers can accomplish. But from time to time, other operating systems have some pretty great ideas. Here are seven of my personal favorites that Linux distributions might want to consider “borrowing.” Hint, hint. Nudge, nudge.

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From: Network World

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Munich’s great Linux desktop initiative may end

By Andy Patrizio

A decade ago, there was much hoopla over the city of Munich discarding Windows desktops in favor of Linux, which were thought to be more secure and cheaper to deploy and maintain.

Well, that experiment is coming to an end. TechRepublic reports the city is prepared to shift gears and allow users once again to choose Windows for their work PC instead of Linux after complaints of poorer productivity and compatibility issues. But it’s not going to happen overnight; the Windows option won’t come until 2021.

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From: Network World

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Open source users: It’s time for extreme vetting

By Paul Krill

Open source software is the norm these days rather than the exception. The code is being written in high volumes and turning up in critical applications. While having this code available can offer big benefits, users also must be wary of issues the code can present and implement proper vetting.

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(Insider Story)

From: Network World

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Wine 2.0 brings MS Office 2013 compatibility to Linux

By Bryan Lunduke

This week, Wine—the project that allows you to run many Microsoft Windows applications on non-Windows platforms—hit a rather huge milestone: version 2.0.

From the Wine 2.0 release notes:

“This release represents over a year of development effort and around 6,600 individual changes. The main highlights are the support for Microsoft Office 2013 and the 64-bit support on macOS.”

I’ll be honest. The Mac OS tidbit isn’t all that interesting to me. But the support for Microsoft Office 2013 is, almost certainly, of interest to a number of people. (I don’t use it personally, but I know plenty of organizations that do.)

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From: Network World

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Self-protection is key to Linux kernel security

By Fahmida Y. Rashid

Linux has quietly taken over the world. The operating system now powers the large datacenters that make all our cloud applications and services possible, along with billions of Android devices and internet-connected gadgets that comprise the internet of things (IoT). Even the systems that handle the day-to-day operations on the International Space Station run Linux.

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(Insider Story)

From: Network World

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IDG Contributor Network: Resin.IO puts Linux and containers to work for IoT

By Dan Kusnetzky

Resin.IO is working to make the use of containers and microservices useful tools to developers of Linux-based Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

CEO Alexandros Marinos said the company has been working for three years to make mainstream containers attractive to developers of embedded workloads, such as those found in IoT applications. The company calls this the “Industrial Internet.”

What Resin.IO offers

Resin.IO offers a development and deployment framework based upon Linux and containers (Docker) that is designed to facilitate control of the on-device environment, provision devices on the network, and manage of what the company calls a “fleet” of systems. These tools also make it possible to automate operations of “the fleet” and keep it secure through the use of encrypted communications to/from devices in “the fleet” that deploys two-factor authentication.

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From: Network World

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