Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux!

By Rand Morimoto

A couple years ago Microsoft embarked on a “Microsoft Loves Linux” initiative to bring Linux into the fold of everything Microsoft. For a company that has traditionally been known for Windows and Office that has not historically been seen as particularly too Linux friendly, there was a bit of a stretch of the imagination how Microsoft and Linux would end up playing well together.

Roll forward a couple years, with the world very much a cloud-based environment, and 1 out of every 3 virtual machines running in Microsoft’s Azure Cloud being a Linux system (and growing), along with more and more Linux growth in the Microsoft ecosystem, the vision of a couple years ago is now very much a reality.

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From: Network World

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Lessons learned from the failure of Ubuntu Touch

By Bryan Lunduke

With the death of yet another open source/free software/Linux-based mobile platform, Ubuntu Touch, clearly it is time for us to sit down and have a frank discussion about what we in the free software world can reasonably accomplish in a mobile platform.

One of the biggest issues—if not THE biggest issue—with Ubuntu Touch was that it simply had goals that were far too aggressive to reasonably achieve. It suffered from the all-too-common malady known in software development as feature creep.

Ubuntu Touch was not simply a project to bring the existing Ubuntu system to mobile hardware and add functionality specific to that hardware (such as phone dialing, cell data, etc.). The project also contained:

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From: Network World

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IDG Contributor Network: The big news at DockerCon 2017 was no big news

By James Thomason

The biggest news from DockerCon 2017, the semi-annual conference on Linux containerization, was the lack of big news. After the last two years of feverish development, there are signs one of the hottest trends in tech might be slowing down.

“I’m not sure,” said one software developer loitering just outside of the Austin Convention Center. That was the most common response to my question, “What was the biggest news at DockerCon this year?” I must have asked 30 people that question over my two days at the event. An informal, unscientific polling of my Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook connections has been similar.

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From: Network World

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Ubuntu Phone security updates end in June, app store closing

By Bryan Lunduke

From: Network World

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39% off Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux, Paperback – Deal Alert

By DealPost Team

The Raspberry Pi’s most famous feature is its adaptability. It can be used for thousands of electronic applications, and using the Linux OS expands the functionality even more. This book, Exploring Raspberry Pi, is the innovators guide to bringing Raspberry Pi to life. The book favors engineering principles over a ‘recipe’ approach to give you the skills you need to design and build your own projects. You’ll understand the fundamental principles in a way that transfers to any type of electronics, electronic modules, or external peripherals, using a “learning by doing” approach that caters to both beginners and experts. The book begins with basic Linux and programming skills, and helps you stock your inventory with common parts and supplies. Next, you’ll learn how to make parts work together to achieve the goals of your project, no matter what type of components you use. The companion website provides a full repository that structures all of the code and scripts, along with links to video tutorials and supplementary content that takes you deeper into your project. The list price has been reduced 39% on Amazon, from $35 to $21.40. See this deal now on Amazon. A complete Raspberry Pi starter kit can be purchased here for $89.99.

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From: Network World

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Linux Mint 18.1: Mostly smooth, but some sharp edges

By Tom Henderson

We’ve been fond of Linux Mint for its ability to present a friendly interface to the average end user, while having a stable foundation of Debian and Ubuntu underneath. In this review, we looked at LinuxMint 18.1, dubbed Serena. We found a solid operating system that can run into problems in edge case scenarios.

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(Insider Story)

From: Network World

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Unity out at Canonical amid big shakeups

By Jon Gold

Canonical, the company behind the best-known Linux distribution in the world and one of the biggest players in commercial open source software, has announced several large-scale changes of direction that have created big ripples in the open source world.

The biggest news is that the company will no longer focus development resources on its Unity desktop front-end for Linux – a long-standing project designed to make Ubuntu a viable operating system for a wide array of endpoints, including phones and tablets. Instead, Ubuntu will move back to the venerable GNOME desktop environment, which it split from in 2010.

+ALSO ON NETWORK WORLD: Samsung’s profit soars after recovery from Note7 debacle + Microsoft Surface beats Apple iPad in JD Power tests

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From: Network World

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