Viewing Linux output in columns

By Sandra Henry-Stocker

The Linux column command makes it easy to display data in a columnar format — often making it easier to view, digest, or incorporate into a report. While column is a command that’s simple to use, it has some very useful options that are worth considering. In the examples in this post, you will get a feel for how the command works and how you can get it to format data in the most useful ways.

By default, the column command will ignore blanks lines in the input data. When displaying data in multiple columns, it will organize the content by filling the left column first and then moving to the right. For example, a file containing numbers 1 to 12 might be displayed in this order:

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From: Network World

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Lenovo’s new workstation is indeed ‘Tiny’ but packs a punch

By Marc Ferranti

Windows users who work in tight spaces and looking for a small form factor workstation with multiple display ports and solid processing power have a new contender to check out: the new ThinkStation P320 Tiny.

The workstation lives up to its name: At 1.4 x 7.1 by 7.2 inches, it’s the smallest workstation on the market that is ISV (independent software vendor) certified, according to Rob Herman, the general manager of Lenovo’s workstation business unit.

The ISV certification is important. “We don’t consider a machine to be a workstation unless it has ISV certification,” according to Lloyd Cohen, an analyst with IDC.

The U.S. government uses the same definition for workstations and for non-government users, software certifications mean that you can run CAD and CAM programs, for example, without worrying about crashing, Cohen noted. That’s important if you’re working on a complex design.

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From: Network World

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How to keep Linux from hanging up on you

By Sandra Henry-Stocker

When you run a command in the background on a Linux system and then log out, the process you were running will stop abruptly. If you elect to run the command with a no-hangup command, on the other hand, it will continue running and will store its output in a file.

Here’s how this works. The nohup command instructs your process to ignore the SIGHUP signal that would normally shut it down. That allows you to leave time-consuming processes to complete on their own without you having to remain logged in. By default, the output of the command you are running will be left in a file named nohup.out so that you can find your data the next time you log in.

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From: Network World

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Improving on history

By Sandra Henry-Stocker

The Linux history command allows users to repeat commands without retyping them and to look over a list of commands that they’ve recently used, but that’s just the obvious stuff. It is also highly configurable, allows you to pick and choose what you reuse (e.g., complete commands or portions of commands), and control what commands are recorded. In today’s post, we’re going to run through the basics and then explore some of the more interesting behaviors of the history command.

The basics

Typing “history” and getting a list of previously entered commands is the command’s most obvious use. Pressing the up arrow until you reach a command that you want to repeat and hitting enter to rerun it is next. And, as you probably know, you can also use the down arrow. In fact, you can scroll up and down your list of previously entered commands to review them or rerun them.

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From: Network World

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The problem with Linux packaging in large organizations

By Bryan Lunduke

One of the challenges of implementing and utilizing Linux across a large organization—an organization where there are many different people with significantly different computing needs—is … packaging.

Seriously. Packaging is a big problem.

Just as an example:

Let’s say you are in charge of IT for a 1,000-person organization. Your server needs dictate that you’ll need (or at least likely want) a server-oriented Linux distribution with some sort of paid support contract. Easy enough. You can choose Red Hat Enterprise or SUSE Linux Enterprise. Server needs met.

But what about the marketing department? Does an enterprise-grade, server-focused distribution make sense for all of them? Probably not. Maybe you can standardize on one of the media production-focused distributions—or perhaps the community-driven sides of the enterprise distribution you already chose for your servers.

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From: Network World

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IDG Contributor Network: 3 benefits you didn’t expect from Linux containers

By Scott McCarty

Linux containers are gaining significant ground in the enterprise, which is not surprising, since they make so much sense in today’s business environment. With that said, container technology as we know it today is relatively new, and companies are still in the process of understanding the different ways in which containers can be leveraged.

In a nutshell, Linux containers enable companies to package up and isolate applications with all of the files necessary for each to run. This makes it easy to move containerized applications among environments while retaining their full functionality.

+ Also on Network World: Adapting the network for the rise of containers +

The recent Bain and Company study “For Traditional Enterprises, the Path to Digital and the Role of Containers” found that “respondents are beginning to benefit from faster innovation as well as improved development and deployment cycles. For example, adopters frequently report 15 to 30 percent reductions in development time. Adopters also report initial cost savings of 5 to 15 percent due to greater hardware and process efficiencies.”

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From: Network World

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The ultimate Linux Trojan horse: Windows Subsystem for Linux

By Bryan Lunduke

I’m a Linux user. And, as the old adage goes, “I don’t do Windows.”

This is not an article about how Linux is superior to Windows. Truth be told, I don’t begrudge any person’s choice of computing environment—be it Windows, Mac, BSD, Amiga. What each person uses is truly up to them. Me? I use open source. I use free software. I use Linux.

So, what then, do I make of Microsoft’s Windows Subsystem for Linux aka WSL?

For those unfamiliar, the WSL is basically a compatibility layer within Windows 10 that allows you to run Linux binaries. The end result is that you can run a full Linux shell, complete with Linux terminal applications, on a Windows PC.

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From: Network World

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