GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

By Bryan Lunduke

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment.

But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers.

With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.)

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From: Network World

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Desktop Linux the best it’s ever been—and keeps getting better

By Bryan Lunduke

I can be a pretty pessimistic guy. I’m fairly convinced that the Internet of Things spells certain doom for mankind, and I’ve made a habit of standing in front of large rooms full of people simply to tell them how much I think “Linux sucks.”

If you were to call me a Negative Nancy, you wouldn’t be far off.

To make matters worse, I’m about to publish three new articles—each of them extremely pessimistic and gloomy—over the next week. otal “sky is falling, we’re all gonna die” sort of stuff.

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From: Network World

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Discover the power of Bash on Windows

By Adam Bertram

Microsoft Windows may be the dominant player on the desktop, but the rapidly increasing open source software market—especially for admin and dev tools—clearly favors Linux. Not to mention the mobile market, where Android uses Linux variants. If you’re a developer on Windows, the drumbeat to get hip to Linux capabilities keeps getting louder.

Over the years, Microsoft has introduced various workarounds for using Linux capabilities on Windows, such as PowerShell with SSH and Cygwin and MSYS. Running Linux inside a virtual machine is another option. But VMs consume a significant amount of resources and don’t provide a first-class Linux experience, as you can’t edit local files or get full access to local drives, for example.

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From: Network World

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Pivotal, Google team up for Kubernetes cloud management

By Paul Krill

Pivotal and Google have launched Project Kubo to apply Pivotal’s Bosh tool for deploying and managing cloud software to Google’s Kubernetes container orchestration platform.

Currently in an alpha release stage, Kubo instantiates, deploys, and manages Kubernetes clusters on any cloud. Pivotal has been working on the project with members of the Google Cloud platform team.

Kubo can be used with existing production applications written in specific languages, and it can access platform primitives. Bosh, featured as part of Cloud Foundry, provides an open source tool chain for managing large-scale distributed services. It offers a combination of a virtual machine build tool, configuration and health management, and logging. Bosh has been used to build consistent, self-healing environments with zero downtime, Seroter said.

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From: Network World

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Raspberry Pi roundup: Happy 5th birthday, baby! Also, new software, a tough piano, and, well, Windows 98

By Jon Gold

I am a shameful forgetter of important dates, as family and ex-girlfriends will be happy to tell you. They can detail the brainless “duh?” expression, with tinges of dawning comprehension, that I make when I am reminded that, yes, it’s today, and yes, I have forgotten.

It’s a different story, professionally – I did remember that the Raspberry Pi’s fifth birthday took place this weekend, but I was traveling to cover a wireless company’s annual conference for work, and I simply couldn’t fit it in. So, to the little tiny computer that was one of the very first stories I covered for Network World, I’m sorry. I really did have other stuff to do.

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From: Network World

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How to format an SD card in Linux

By Swapnil Bhartiya

As I was working on a tutorial about installing Raspbian on Raspberry Pi 3, I realized that I had to format the Micro SD card with fat32 partition. Another tutorial was in order!

Since different desktop environments use different tools to perform the same task, I resorted to one method that can be consistent across desktop environments: command line.

So here is how you format an SD card, USB drive or Micro SD card with fat32 file system from the command line in Linux.

1. Plug in your removable flash drive and run the ‘lsblk’ command to identify the device.

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From: Network World

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Get started podcasting and producing video on Linux

By Bryan Lunduke

Interested in producing your own podcast or video series entirely from a free software-fueled, Linux-powered computer? Here’s how I accomplish that task.

Feel free to copy my exact setup for your own use. Or take some of my recommendations. Or ignore everything I say here and do things better than I do. Either way, hopefully this proves useful in your Linux-fueled media production endeavors.

Podcasting and video hardware

The hardware setup for my daily recording is fairly simple. More often than not, I utilize a Blue USB Yeti microphone. It has exceptionally good sound (especially for the roughly $100 price tag) and functions as a sound device on every modern Linux distribution I’ve encountered.

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From: Network World

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